Tag Archives: Loewe

Loewe presents ‘Minor White: metaphors’ at its oldest store in Gran Via, Madrid

Fashion powerhouse LOEWE takes a step towards another art form: photography. On June 1, the LOEWE Foundation unveiled the first solo exhibition in Spain devoted to legendary American photographer — Minor White. Titled ‘Minor White: metaphors’, the exhibition is taking place at the LOEWE gallery in Gran Via, Madrid.

Known for his ability to manipulate and angle light sources, White’s photography medium focused entirely on black and white prints. His distinctive style enabled a spectrum of black, white and grey hues to bring his portraits to life. Dabbling in subjects from cityscapes to nature shots and portraits, White regularly placed the symbolism of his art form above the reality that it showcased, creating a world of his own. The show is set to feature 40 of White’s original black and white prints, on special loan from the Howard Greenberg gallery and private collections.

LOEWE creative director Jonathan Anderson explains ‘Minor White’s modernity is a natural fit for the house because his photographs function on various levels. At LOEWE, we believe in multivalence.’

Born in 1908, White only became a professional photographer in the late 1930s. He moved to New York in 1945 and worked as a photographer at the Museum of Modern Art, becoming friends with eminent photographers of that time. White also cemented his mark in the photography industry, co-founding the iconic photography magazine Aperture in 1952 and serving as its editor for two decades.

This is LOEWE Foundation’s seventh annual participation in Photo España, and the fourth festival entry organised by curator María Millán. ‘Minor White: metaphors’ will be open from June 1 to August 25 at the LOEWE gallery in Gran Via.

For more information, do visit LOEWE.

Creating Fashion that Sells Isn’t a Sin

What is the point of high fashion these days? Is there a reason that designers still get to sit on their high horses when the most talked about brand these days is Vetements, with all its nonstop talk about “clothing people actually wear”? It’s really an issue of the industry failing to catch up with the times, which is strangely ironic considering that fashion is supposed to represent and extol the times it lives in.

In the aughts of haute couture, and really since before the time of Charles Frederick Worth (considered the progenitor of high fashion) and Marie Antoinette, what fashion represented in the zeitgeist and times was desire. Plain and simple, it was about elevating and making clothing so beautiful, flattering, and jealousy-inducing that it was a means to a social end. Fashion is so strikingly bourgeois and hierarchical today precisely because it has, for so many years, represented a certain degree of sophistication and, indeed, wealth.

Selling isn't a sin: Chanel

Chanel

So what is high fashion for today, if Chanel is no longer haughtily pronouncing items of clothing démodé and instead, planting emojis onto accessories and clothing? If a brand as vaunted and intellectual as Prada is selling bags straight off the runway, can it still maintain a cachet of luxury and intelligence without the stink of shilling products (perhaps by making customers wait for the rest of its seasonal fashion direction)?

Selling isn't a sin: Balenciaga

Balenciaga

I posit that high fashion today is returning to its core, plain and simple, all over again. It is about beautiful clothing, wonderful things people feel an urge to wear, and representing the cultural values of the times. It is why Balenciaga under Demna Gvasalia feels so… right. With its post-modern melding of old-world techniques and new-age street-wise tricks, it has been vaulted right back into the fashion consciousness – and it is worth paying attention to again. With the advertising and PR money of fashion, it sometimes becomes difficult to differentiate what’s worth the time and what’s paid for. The purest reaction, then, is clothing that can convince customers to part with money to put on their back.

Selling isn't a sin: Vetements

Vetements

The ’90s were all at once the best and worst time for intellectual fashion, but that’s gone down the drain now. Conglomeration of brands and companies meant that fashion as an art and a means to an end was becoming monetized. Think of LVMH, Kering and Prada group’s expansions at the time.

Today, LVMH’s brands are represented in a good half of all fashion magazines’ front bumper of ads. Louis Vuitton, Dior, Céline, Loewe, Kenzo, Marc Jacobs, Givenchy, Fendi – even jewelry and watch brands such as Bulgari, Chaumet, Hublot, TAG Heuer, etc. Kering rounds it up with Gucci, Saint Laurent, Bottega Veneta, Alexander McQueen, Balenciaga, Stella McCartney, etc. Where did the mavericks like Helmut Lang and Martin Margiela go?

In an environment where people simply demanded more and more clothing, it became hard for such intellectually-driven and conceptual designers to continue – never mind that the clothes they designed and created were eminently wearable and beautiful. But it was tricky, because the old shows from Prada, for instance, were such subtle exercises in decryption. Meaning was layered and veiled, and it took a trained eye and mind to pick apart what exactly Mrs Prada was saying each season. Today, a collection like its FW16 vagabond girls-on-the-run one is, while beautiful, almost obvious to interpret. In recent seasons too: fast cars and sweaty glamour, stiff Stepford wives’ tailoring, duney desert travellers. They make big political and cultural statements, but they’re plain to see.

Selling isn't a sin: Saint Laurent

Saint Laurent

Therein lies the problem. When fashion becomes grounds for intellectual concepts, customers get frustrated. It was famously hard for people to grasp Craig Green’s debut SS15 collection with flowing judoka quilts and banners bound to the models. But it struck a chord with the industry collective viewing the show – inspiring some tears, even. Here was a collection set against an Enya soundtrack, resplendent in creative liberty and in the luxury of time it took to craft. It was beautiful and it sold. Next season, he did a similar thing – line and silhouette were only slightly different, but there was a complete reversal in the reaction of the press. Lambasts of similarity and repetition abounded, and it became clear that the industry was on the same page as its readers’ attention spans. Never mind giving designers time to develop an idea and letting it stew, mutate, evolve and be felt out. We wanted more and more of the new.

Selling isn't a sin: Prada

Prada

So where is intellectual fashion’s place in today’s fast-paced commercial churning environment? It is a conundrum that is hard to solve. Perhaps that is why Vetements is so successful – because it makes you feel like you’re thinking and being smart about things while contributing no effort at all. Perhaps it is why Hedi Slimane’s Saint Laurent was such a runaway commercial success – because you didn’t have to think while wearing his clothes, you just had to partake in his vacuous vein of L.A. grungy cool. Perhaps it is why Phoebe Philo’s Céline is so influential – women don’t have to think about what they’re representing to the world because Philo’s clothing whispers refinement for them. Perhaps it is why Alessandro Michele’s Gucci is so refreshing – they’re simply fun to wear (the same, season after season) and don’t offer much by way of a political or cultural message.

I am not against any of this.

Selling isn't a sin: Jacquemus

Jacquemus

On the contrary, it is the way fashion is today, and to whine about time gone by is to be astoundingly near-sighted – rather, rear-sighted. Karl Lagerfeld has been so good for Chanel exactly because he takes to the times he lives in like a cultural sponge. There’s a respect to the historical foundations of the brand, but even more surely a perspective of today.

Selling isn't a sin: Gucci

Gucci

What I’m saying is that “commercial” isn’t necessarily a bad word. We’ve been wary of the financial beast for long enough; it’s time to be smart about it and synthesize what we know with what we want. There’s a reason designers such as Christian Lacroix went out of business despite his reign in the ’80s and ’90s in Paris: extravagance and bonanza dresses stopped becoming relevant. After sobering financial crashes, actual plane crashes and a global worldview of uncertainty, the dream was over.

Selling isn't a sin: Dries Van Nolen

Dries Van Nolen

Today, the new dream is perhaps clothes that slide right into daily life. A note: I’m not saying poorly designed and poorly made clothes with nary a thought or smarts should get a pass for being easy to buy and wear. I’m talking about fashion that has a contextual place in contemporary culture and represents a designer’s point of view. Ultimately, that’s the place of fashion: on our backs.

This article was first published in L’Officiel Singapore.

Game Changers: 5 Bags For All Seasons

This season’s most memorable bags are all about reform (nothing destructive, though). Whether it is newly introduced styles or impeccable updates of icons, our picks aren’t only attractive, they’ll also shift your perspective.

Holographic City Trunk PM by Louis Vuittonlouis-vuitton

We never thought Nicolas Ghesquière could be so… Zen. This little piece of hardware proves that. Yes, there’s a dent in it, and that’s the beautiful reason why we’re rethinking the entire sphere of Ghesquière’s spirituality. Despite its overtly contemporary form, the City trunk emanates wabi-sabi (the Japanese art of finding beauty in imperfection), which is enlightening, considering how every other brand strives, instead, for perfection.

Tweed Amazona by Loeweloewe

As far as tweed bags go, most of them have been chichi. Thank god for Jonathan Anderson, the holy mastermind of the Amazona reinvention. Now he’s bringing a chic, fringy update that masks the bag’s actual silhouette. With plenty of texture, it’s the one-of-a-kind bag you’ll sport to death. Every inch of it will end up frayed and we reckon that’s the look Anderson wants you to achieve.

MIUlady by Miu Miumiu-miu

Miuccia Prada knows how to spoil her girls: this is the bag for 2k16 aristocracy. Coming from a designer who consistently plays with ostentation in an ironic fashion, you have the license to have every kind of fun with it. Even if you’re not born a Jenner or a Hadid (who are both atypical of a Miu Miu runway), make sure your purchases convince everyone of your royal lineage.

Runway by Diordior

For Fall/Winter 2016, the Runway proved that studio heads Lucie Meier and Serge Ruffieux are going strong, even without a creative director. Pictured here is a version embroidered entirely with sequinned flowers and fringes – it’s intense. The bag comes in such delicate versions, you’re likely to be engulfed with the fear of getting tangled in everything – but fret not, the workmanship is fantastic.

La Pionnière by Pradaprada

We understand the thrill and prestige of being the first (hence the name) in any field — who wouldn’t want to be associated with innovators and groundbreakers? In today’s world of chaos, we rely on what’s inventive to move us forward. The hunting-inspired cross-body was the first bag Prada offered at the dawn of the “see now, buy now” game, which begs the question: if our lady Miuccia is doing it, will the rest of the industry follow suit?

This article was first published in L’Officiel Singapore.

6 Home Styles for Successful Gentlemen

As fashion and furniture continue to merge their ideals of beauty and form, homes can now dress to express their individual personalities – shaped and driven of course by the personalities and decisions of their owners. Basically, if you can sort of guess which brand is responsible for the look pictured top, you have the style chops to draw something useful from this story. So, leaving aside the admirable projects of refreshing your wardrobe or tricking out your vehicle, you might care for a bigger challenge this season. Our friends at Men’s Folio selected six different brand names to match six different personal styles. This is just the sort of thing magazine folks love to do and we thought we’d share it with you.

For an added sense of character (and better UX!), each of the suggestions is modeled on specific personalities.

The extravagant hedonistversace_home_les_etoiles_de_lamer_dining

Versace Home stays religiously true to its iconic over-style even as the lifestyle arm is brought in-house to complete the brand universe. Under the artistic direction of Donatella Versace, the ritzy collection fetes four brand new lines: Inspired by the Rosenthal-meets-Versace porcelain collection, Les Etoiles de la Mer commits to absolute opulence through precious materials such as Fiore di pesco marble, printed velvets and mercury wood, with prints awash in marine motifs; Vasmara evokes wildlife exoticism with leopard and zebra print decors; futuristic Gvardian is defined by clean lines and a neutral palette, with a carbon fibre table top conveying spacey visual and tactile effect; finally, the established Via Gesù Palazzo Empire range is expanded with a one-of-a-kind sky blue nubuck sofa shaped in the defining “V” of the brand. Standing out from the christened collections is the new climate-proof aluminum chair Mesedia. Crafted in the image of Versace’s unmistakable Medusa head, Mesedia is emblematic of the new Home collection and is available in five colours that remind of shifting skies: Haze, storm, cloud, purple sunset and sunrise.

Versace Home

The sensitive homebody_bcd5174-tissus-et-papiers-peints

They say home is where your heart is set in stone; is where you go when you’re alone (that there’s some catchy lyrics from Gabrielle Aplin’s 2013 hit single, “Home”). In any case, if home is truly where your heart lies, then no doubt you’ll be a fan of Hermès’ latest home collection inspired by the ideal of the home as shelter for body and mind. Under the aegis of artistic directors Charlotte Perelman and Alexis Fabry, the home is transformed into a refuge of relaxation with simple yet elegant touches. Different threads of the collection — ranging from the re-edited Oria chairs by Spanish architect Rafael Moneo to the showpiece Sellier sofa demonstrating the equestrian heritage of the Maison — collectively address the theme of balance, which Hermès believes thrives and reigns in enclosed spaces. This balancing act is also cleverly propagated in the Équilibre d’Hermès assembly of desk and decorative accessories, consisting of a harmonious blend of functional and whimsical pieces: A magazine rack in the form of a horse saddle, an icosahedron paperweight, a magnifying glass held in perfect equipoise atop a conical base.

Hermès

The space rockerdiesel-living-at-salone-del-mobile-2016-3                                                                            

Imagine serving your favourite pasta on Venus, or scooping ice cream from moon craters — if you’re obsessed with astronomy and the stars, you’re in for a treat. For 2016, Diesel Living parades its latest collaboration with Italian design brand Seletti in its Cosmic Diner tableware line. Inspired by the universe, the heavenly (as close as it gets) collection comprises of porcelain plates representing the planets of the solar system, a Starman vase, salt and pepper grinders in the shape of rockets, as well as meteorite glasses to end the poetic set up. The collaboration with Seletti is among five ongoing projects that Diesel Living has going on, including Moroso for furniture, Foscarini for lighting, Iris Ceramica for ceramic tiling, and Scavolini for a new kitchen concept. The Moroso and Foscarini collections illustrate Diesel’s individualistic lifestyle with industrial design and rock styling, while the Diesel Open Workshop Kitchen with Scavolini celebrates the ethos of “Come in, we’re open!” with an open-concept social kitchen the builds on the brand’s creativity and free expression.

Diesel Living

The ethereal minimalistarmani-casa-store-in-corso-venezia-14_06-by-davide-lovatti

Unlike those of us who express our feelings through intense rituals — entire mornings spent painting, shouting out at open seas, retail therapy on useless junk — designer Giorgio Armani conveys his thoughts in a more refined manner. More often than not, he translates his obsessions into an elegant collection of timeless creations, and judging from his latest set for Armani/Casa, it’s pretty clear his current fixation is on light. The Time Of Lightness experiments with the notion of light and how its interplay (through shadows and reflections) can transform regular architecture into irregular elements, with Armani putting this sophistication into the perspective of minimalism and simplicity. The collection is gratifyingly considerate, keeping in mind all aspects of one’s lifestyle. It first offers a selection of tables — the Luna rotating table, Lewis oval table and Egidio low table, to name a few — then accompanies them with a complete tableware set. It also pieces together other home elements such as the Leonard buffet (two versions, with drawers and shelves or as a television unit) and Club bar cabinet, the latter a 50-piece limited edition hand-made with black straw marquetry and dramatized in an Ocean lacquer finish that calls to mind The Great Wave off Kanagawa by renowned Japanese artist Hokusai. These are topped off with resplendent Murano glass pieces and exquisite textiles by Rubelli.

Armani/Casa

The pop artistrock-valley-coffee-table_

Following last year’s series of ceramics-inspired leather bowls, Spanish luxury brand Loewe is back to win hearts with an entire bag of striking and eccentric designs crafted in leather marquetry. Conceived by creative director Jonathan Anderson, this latest collection of oak furniture is embellished with leather cut-outs in an array of shapes and colours pieced together to form mosaic drawings of flowers and landscapes. The project is partly inspired by the radical design ideas of pioneering artist-critic Roger Fry (furniture covered in bold, hand-painted patterns, for example), and the motifs are taken from silk prints found in Loewe’s archives, including a recurring carp adapted from a set of centuries-old Japanese wood screens Anderson found in Hong Kong. The end product is stunning, with six new creations, including a large wardrobe and two Baillie Scott chairs, along with lamps and cigar boxes as well as notebooks and leather pouches, all coated in fun to brighten up your living space.

Casa Loewe

The unrepentant gentlemanbottega-veneta-home-collection-bottega-veneta-via-borgospesso-home-boutique-3

Bronze tables surfaced in the signature intrecciato leather weave (an exclusive collaboration with Italian designer Osanna Visconti di Modrone), Murano lamps in new cigar and nero colorations, suede and leather drawers fitted with iconic bronzed handles — there’s nothing in Bottega Veneta’s home collection that doesn’t spell masculine decadence. When set against a backdrop of historic frescoes, coffered ceilings and stone walls found in a profound 18th century palazzo (Palazzo Gallarati Scotti in the heart of Milan, to be precise), the curated creations by creative director Tomas Maier even provide a taste of medieval excess. Apart from the aforementioned pieces, the collection boasts a suede seating set (club chair, foot rest, three-seat couch and day bed) named Rudi in collaboration with Poltrona Frau, a series of sterling silver collectible boxes each bearing semi-precious stones and planetary names, and a delicate hand-painted porcelain dining service. It’s a long list of complementary pieces that come together coherently to exude sophistication in the homes of those with discerning tastes.

Bottega Veneta

This article was first published in Men’s Folio.

loewe-small-hammock-bag

Loewe Small Hammock Bag: Larger than Life

We can’t talk about the Loewe Small Hammock bag without mentioning its intriguing shape-shifting abilities. This season, our favorite functional carrier from the Spanish leather house might have shrunk in size, but is bigger in style.

Like its name suggests, the bag is inspired by the hammock. Loewe’s creative director Jonathan Anderson applied the relaxed silhouette and unfussy construction principle of the hanging bed to the carrier. Crafted from a single piece of calfskin, the Hammock bag offers versatility in its adaptation to varying needs and situations, thanks in part to the multitude of zips and folds.

Available in a series of colors and prints – think marine, aqua, leopard and red – the bag will also feature Loewe’s trademark lujado hand-painted edges and discreetly embossed Anagram, both hallmarks of the brand’s dedication to superior quality and craftsmanship.

Find out more about the Loewe Small Hammock Bag on L’Officiel.com now.

loewe-ibiza-summer-shop

Loewe Opens Second Ibiza Summer Shop

For its second year running, Loewe returns to sunny Ibiza Town for its Summer Shop. Inside, an equally sprightly décor awaits – John Allen applies his brilliant use of colour and delightfully abstract English landscapes to the store’s interiors.

Hosted by Loewe’s creative director Jonathan Anderson himself at the Ibiza Museum of Contemporary Art, the store’s opening saw a star-studded guest list that included prolific blogger Bryanboy, model Jamie Bochert and DJ Marco Llorente amongst many others. As one of the oldest contemporary art museums in Spain, the 17th-century landmark served as an interesting juxtaposition for Allen’s bold works of art.

Find out more about the Ibiza Summer Store at L’Officiel.com now.

Loewe Furniture: Marquetry in Leather

After conquering the fashion world, Jonathan Anderson has gone ahead with his conquest of the furniture scene too with Loewe’s Marquetry in Leather. The young designer showed a series of specially curated and designed oak furniture for the Salone del Mobile in Milan this year, each luxuriously swathed in layers of leather in different textures and colors.

Inspired by the radical design ideas by both artist-critic Roger Fry and The Bloomsbury Group, Anderson applied his own spin on archival prints and patterns to a select few 20th-century furniture, including a large wardrobe and two Baillie Scott chairs.

And while we have our eyes set on every one of the brightly-hued pieces, the carp motif came up top of our wish list. Adapted from a set of centuries-old Japanese wood screens that Anderson found in Hong Kong, the print was made contemporary with contrasting colors and varying textures. If you want yourself a bit of Loewe’s sprightly series, the Spanish leather house will also rework the prints on lamps and cigar boxes, as well as notebooks and leather pouches, all of which will sell in stores.

Read more about the collection on L’Officiel.com now.

Childlike Simplicity: Loewe SS17

We’re playing pretend sailors this SS17 with Loewe. Returning to creative director Jonathan Anderson’s inspirational starting point of the Balearic island, this season sees a highly textural and utilitarian aesthetic. Organic garment-dyed fabrics come out to play in airy silhouettes, while natural driftwood and cork pieces are the materials of choice for the accessories. Inject a splash of bright color here, and childlike motifs there, and you pretty much have Loewe SS17 in sum. Oh, and did we mention that the bags are so very structural – and so very enchanting? It’s a trip back to one’s childhood, but a very pared-down luxe and down-to-earth one at that.

Read more about the collection at Men’s Folio Singapore.

Loewe Collaborates with Textile Designer John Allen

Loewe’s latest collaboration with textile designer John Allen is about to make your summer wardrobe a lot more exciting. Unlike the Britain’s typically gray skies, Allen’s interpretation of iconic British landscapes feature bright pops of colors. The ‘Lost Dog’ and ‘Stonehenge’ designs are also made with a special leather marquetry technique, and applied onto the label’s T-Pouch, T-Bucket bag and even on silk scarves and beach towels.

“John’s use of color and the purity of his work translates perfectly to Loewe, which stands for the very best in craft today,” said creative director Jonathan Anderson about the textile artist.

Find out more about the exciting collaboration at L’OfficielSingapore.com today.

Insider: 9 Beauty Notes

In a world where the benchmark of beauty glamour are dictated by sirens of the celluloid screen, we bring you 9 insider tips to help you sparkle and shine in your unabashed realness.

On Brigitta: Mesh bodysuit, La Perla. Leather whipstitched booties with tassels, Roger Vivier. Gold brass necklace, Louis Vuitton. Gold brass bracelet, Céline. On Fabio and Matthew: Swimming briefs, Calvin Klein Underwear.

On Brigitta: Mesh bodysuit, La Perla. Leather whipstitched booties with tassels, Roger Vivier. Gold brass necklace, Louis Vuitton. Gold brass bracelet, Céline. On Fabio and Matthew: Swimming briefs, Calvin Klein Underwear.

Beauty note 1:

Opium from Yves Saint Laurent is a behemoth of an oriental spicy scent. The time-tested classic conjures cigarettes left burning and the shadow of a demi-mondaine. M.A.C. Face and Body foundation is fantastic for giving exposed skin coverage and an even finish. To achieve an all-over glow, Tom Ford’s Soleil Blanc Shimmering Body Oil will leave a decadent cast of gold.

On Nicolai: Acetate sunglasses, Loewe.

On Nicolai: Acetate sunglasses, Loewe.

Beauty note 2:

Red is as timeless as it is powerful: a strong lip in the classic M.A.C Rubywoo lipstick is faultless and universally flattering. NARS Audacious Lipstick in Jeanne is a vampy alternative. On the eyes, try the Matte Eyeshadow in Persia from NARS for a colour-blocked statement on the lids.

For colour-treated hair, Sachajuan Silver Conditioner deeply moisturises and tones the colour to prevent brassiness and dullness. Hanz de Fuko Claymation gives good lift and structure to hair, allowing you to style it any way. A bit of the timeless L’Oréal Elnett Hairspray will keep things in place, with a subtle flaxen finish.

LO-May-Gloss-Beauty-Note-article-3

Beauty note 3:

The waft of seduction and desire is captured in Tom Ford’s Tobacco Vanille, a spicy-sweet fragrance that combines the heaviness of a musky wood base and the masculine sweetness of cloves and cacao – the kind of accords that make you stop and take a deep breath.

On Brigitta: Mesh body suit, La Perla. Gold brass necklace, Louis Vuitton. Gold brass bracelet, Céline. On Fabio and Matthew: Swimming briefs, Calvin Klein Underwear.

On Brigitta: Mesh body suit, La Perla. Gold brass necklace, Louis Vuitton. Gold brass bracelet, Céline. On Fabio and Matthew: Swimming briefs, Calvin Klein Underwear.

Beauty note 4:

Express your inner lady-in-red with a spritz of Frederic Malle’s Carnal Flower, rendering a piercing gauze of animalic camphor married to the feminine wiles of tuberose. Mousse Fort and Volupt Spray from Sebastian Professional build volume and give silken lightness to hair. Define and introduce mystery to the eyes with the Tom Ford Eye Defining Pen, NARS Dual-Intensity Eyeshadow in Pasiphae and Chanel Illusion d’Ombre in Mirage.

On Brigitta: Silver loop earrings, Hermès. Tribale earrings, Dior.

On Brigitta: Silver loop earrings, Hermès. Tribale earrings, Dior.

Beauty note 5:

To achieve hyper sculptural facial structure, put a shadow to the cheekbones with Tom Ford Shade & Illuminate, using the namesake Shade & Illuminate brush. Head-turning highlights can be achieved using NARS The Multiple in Copacabana, copiously smeared on the high points of the cheekbones, nose bridge and brow bones. Coat the eyelashes in these layers: Tom Ford Extreme Mascara, Chanel Le Volume, finished with M.A.C Opulash to tube and set.

Prep the hair with Shu Uemura Art of Hair Volumizing Mousse to give a voluminous start, followed by Sachajuan Styling Cream for a sleek finish. A light spray of OSiS+ Extreme Hold Hairspray will lend a pliable but finished gloss for hair that flies and defies gravity.

On Brigitta: Transparent hoodie, Longchamp. Mirrored earring, Loewe.

On Brigitta: Transparent hoodie, Longchamp. Mirrored earring, Loewe.

Beauty note 6:

A good pucker takes effort – Clé de Peau Lip Treatment is a luxuriously smooth and refined serum that leaves lips soft and plump. Follow that with a swipe of Tom Ford Matte Lip Colour in the delicious shade Black Dahlia to enhance the pout – all the better to kiss with.

On Brigitta: Denim jeans, Calvin Klein Jeans. Silver earrings and Kelly bracelet, Hermès. On Fabio and Matthew: Denim jeans, Calvin Klein Jeans.

On Brigitta: Denim jeans, Calvin Klein Jeans. Silver earrings and Kelly bracelet, Hermès. On Fabio and Matthew: Denim jeans, Calvin Klein Jeans.

Beauty note 7:

Prep the face with a dollop of Illamasqua Radiance Veil for a lit-from-within lustre. The high points of the face can be brought forward and given light using Becca Shimmering Skin Perfector. For a golden pout, try NARS Larger Than Life Lip Gloss in Gold Digger.

On Nicolai: Acetate sunglasses, Loewe. Silver Collier de Chien bracelet, Hermès.

On Nicolai: Acetate sunglasses, Loewe. Silver Collier de Chien bracelet, Hermès.

Beauty note 8:

Pamper the body with a generous layer of Les Exclusif de Chanel Crème Pour Le Corps body cream from Chanel, designed to maximise and increase the longevity of perfume worn after – Coromandel from the Les Exclusifs range is a spicy balsamic inspired by Chinese lacquered screens. Follow with Guerlain Sunless Tinted Self-Tanning Gel for a bronzed finish – vacation in Ibiza not necessary.

On Brigitta: Neoprene bodice; La Perla. Gold brass necklace, Louis Vuitton. On Fabio and Matthew: Swimming briefs, Calvin Klein Underwear.

On Brigitta: Neoprene bodice; La Perla. Gold brass necklace, Louis Vuitton. On Fabio and Matthew: Swimming briefs, Calvin Klein Underwear.

Beauty note 9:

Seduction for boys and girls comes in Sege Luten’s Five O’Clock Au Gingembre, combining the unexpected spice of candied ginger and the sweetness of over-ripe fruits. Call it bronze or call it gold — NARS Monoi Body Oil I can be used on for daily for moisture and the subtle glimmer of gold flecks. Chanel Le Vernis in Pirate is a timeless red that, when worn, imbues the hands with a beguiling pop of color.

Story credits:

Photography Chuando & Frey

Styling Joshua Cheung

Hair Marc Teng/ Atelier using Sebastian Professional; Sean Ang FAC3INC using La Biosthetique

Makeup Rick Yang, FAC3INC, assisted by Hong Ling using Make Up For Ever

Model Brigitta Liivak, Fabio Toledo, Matthew Djordjevic, Nicolai Otta

This story was first published in L’Officiel Singapore.

Loewe Opens First Southeast Asia Store

Luxury fashion house Loewe opened with its newly designed Casa Loewe in the heart of Singapore with a resounding bang, kicking things off by showcasing its Fall Winter 2016 collection right in Paragon Mall. This was the first look at the collection since its debut at Paris Fashion Week, and it was combined with a cocktail reception for VIPs and media from the region. Also present at the event was Loewe’s Creative Director Jonathan Anderson.

Jonathan Anderson and Deepak Sharma (Managing Director, LOEWE Asia Pacific)

Jonathan Anderson and Deepak Sharma (Managing Director, LOEWE Asia Pacific)

The Casa Loewe stands as a spacious boutique with gleaming black Marquina marble on the façade. Notable inside the store are the showcase of Loewe’s signature bags, as well as a special emerald green canopy overhead. This canopy was a reinterpretation of architect Javier Carvajal’s 1959 piece – first designed for the Loewe flagship store in Madrid.

Casa Loewe Paragon Store 1

The exhibition, displayed in the center of the mall, was flanked by images from Publication No. 10 under the creative direction of M&M (Paris), styled by Benjamin Bruno and photographed by Jamie Hawkesworth at the Maison de L’Unesco the day before the fashion show in Paris set the space for the exhibition.

Casa Loewe Paragon Store Front 2

“The opening of Casa Loewe in Paragon not only presents the brand’s modern identity, but with Singapore’s growth and emergence as a gateway for other South East Asian markets, also strengthens its presence in the region” said Anderson. Indeed, with other stores like Boucheron also viewing the region as an important market, this could be the start of a new era of luxury for Singapore, and Southeast Asia as a whole.

6 Runway Accessory Trends Maximizing Impact

The fashion runways churn out an impressive number of style stories with their trends and designs. Today we take a closer look at the accessories that don’t need to try too hard to catch your attention — simply because you can’t miss them. Bigger is always better it seems with the looks we’ve seen on the catwalk and we can’t wait to share some of our favorites, which are also the favorites of L’Officiel Singapore, who put together this piece.

Bold & BeautifulBold-And-Beautiful-Max-Impact-LO

Statement necklaces and arm parties have seen their day. With so many designers cutting away garments to reveal necks and shoulders, it only makes sense to draw more attention to these areas via a pair of huge, sweeping shoulder-dusters.Make them the focal accessory by going for interesting details and colour combinations, lots of sparkle, or an arresting sculptural shape.

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Fashion’s fallen head over heels for this punk-tinged hardware, but given it a decidedly feminine touch. Alexander Wang used gold chains to embellish the dainty mesh bags in his romantic all-white Balenciaga collection. Miuccia Prada used them on retro, ladylike pieces in her rich, tactile collection, while Armani and Sarah Burton at Alexander McQueen draped them on the body to offset light, delicate clothes.

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Plastic truly is fantastic. Designers as varied as Christopher Kane, Simone Rocha, Karl Lagerfeld at Chanel and John Galliano at Maison Margiela all offered versions of the transparent stuff plastered on bags, heels, sandals and hats. The most directional pieces, though, came from Jonathan Anderson who used it on garments at his eponymous label and on plastic Puzzle bags, pouches, jewelry and even trousers at Loewe.

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If you’re looking to indulge your inner princess fantasies, now is the time to do it. The girls at No 21 wore bands of sparkling stones atop their dreamy white looks. The Rodarte sisters wove medieval-looking gold leaves into their models’ hair, while Dolce and Gabbana crowned their glamorous Italian girls with fruits, crystals and flowers. Not everything was so princess-like though; both Miuccia Prada and Hedi Slimane showed actual tiaras at Miu Miu and Saint Laurent, respectively, but their girls and the clothes had an alluringly rebellious vibe.

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Sandals are a fail-proof summer staple but they’ve now been given a fun fashion twist via luxe materials, bright punchy prints and, most importantly, an elevated standing thanks to a sturdy flatform or a low chunky block heel. We love Fendi’s graphic leather slides, Ferragamo’s strappy ones with pop-coloured soles and those printed Chanel sandals that light up like an airport runway.

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For Spring/Summer ’16, designers have chosen to make their biggest statements in white. The effect is clean and chic, but far from minimal. At Balenciaga, Alexander Wang sent out rucksacks, totes and clutches in beautifully delicate silk satin, lace and woven leathers. Phoebe Philo’s white Céline bags were graphic with interesting hardware details while her Chelsea boots had a chunky, mannish appeal. Massimo Giorgetti’s sandals at Emilio Pucci on the other hand were romantically dotted with pearls.

Story Credits

Text by Jeffrey Yan

This story first appeared in L’Officiel Singapore. 

Fashion Week: 9 Models in the Spotlight

We shine the spotlight not on the clothes, beauty or designers; instead we take a look at the models to look out for in the upcoming seasons. Several have already made an impact in the world of fashion as we see their presence at almost every turn. Others are still flying under the radar and we can’t wait to see their talent showcased next season.

Kendall Jenner and Gigi Hadid

Kendall Jenner and Gigi Hadid

A favorite of designers such as Karl Lagerfeld and Olivier Rousting, Kendall Jenner was a familiar face on the runways of Paris, Milan, London and New York. Other big names that picked the 20-year-old model were Vera Wang, Michael Kors, Marc Jacobs, Fendi, Chanel and Bottega Veneta. Another member of Taylor Swift’s squad, the other star model of the moment Gigi Hadid walked for fewer designers than Jenner. Selecting her shows carefully, the blue-green eyed blonde model was picked by Chanel, Balmain, and Sonia Rykiel and even closed the Fenty x Puma show.

Edie Campbell

Edie Campbell

Other models that were not far behind Jenner and Hadid in their catwalk appearances were Lexi Boiling and Edie Campbell. The models were seen on the runway, walking for Prada, Marc Jacobs and Fendi amongst others. There is one model who is dubbed to be the most in demand right now and she is none other than Mica Arganaraz. The Argentinian model, with a lean figure, messed-up hair and androgynous looks is another favorite amongst designers such as Hugo Boss, Marc Jacobs, Chanel and Chloé.

Mica Arganaraz

Mica Arganaraz

But the rising star who really got fashion month buzzing was Lineisy Montero. The young Dominican was already tipped as one to watch in 2015 after an exceptional season, and her success looks set to continue into 2016. With around 30 appearances across the four fashion capitals, she’s without a doubt one of the most-booked models of the latest round of autumn/winter collection previews — if not the most-booked model. Jason Wu, Alexander Wang, Lacoste, Tory Burch, J.W. Anderson, Topshop Unique, Burberry, Prada, Moschino, Etro, Diesel Black Gold, Versace, Dolce & Gabbana, Marni, H&M Studio and Loewe — to name but a few — all picked Lineisy Montero to show off their latest collections.

Lineisy Montero

Lineisy Montero

While notable names get our attention during Fashion Week, it is also a time for spotting new faces and observe the steady rise of up-and-coming models such as Alana Arrington, Ruth Bell and Paulina Frankowska. While not every designer books them, these models have indeed made their presence known. While Arrington opened Altuzarra’s show, Bell’s shaved head and masculine looks starred at Jason Wu, Burberry and Moschino. Polish model Frankowska also attracted attention with appearances at Prada, Mulberry, Deisel Black Gold and Marni.

Paulina Frankowska

Paulina Frankowska

So Far So Bold: FW 16 Accessories

To complete runway shows for fashion week, designers don’t simply focus on the clothes themselves. Instead they ensure that the accessories, hair and make-up are given just as much attention. While Paris Fashion Week will soon come to a close, it cannot be denied that the accessories on display for Fall/Winter 2016 are bold.

Over at Loewe, chunky jewelry stole the show in the form of bangles stacked on the wrist of models, to big gold chokers that were worn over high necklines. Also embracing the trend of chokers was Balmain. Under the watchful eye of Olivier Rousting, shiny metallic and corrugated plastic were just some of the materials used to create various versions of the accessory.

Thigh-high boots by Rick Owens

Thigh-high boots by Rick Owens

Another trend seen at the shows of both Balmain and Rick Owens, were thigh-highs. While the former stuck with tight thigh-high suede boots, Owens took athleisure to a new level with thigh-high trainers in black and white.

The hunger for fur shows no sign of slowing down, with Vionnet and Dries Van Noten showcasing coats and outerwear adorned with fluffy collars. But the chiquest (and perhaps wackiest) shaggy accessory had to come from Manish Arora, where the models carried puppies dyed purple to match their outfits.

Puppies dyed to match the model's outfits at Manish Arora's runway show

Puppies dyed to match the model’s outfits at Manish Arora’s runway show

 

All images are courtesy of AFP.

10 Trends for Spring/Summer 2016

With winter winding down and spring making its way to us, it is time to think about switching out the winter wear for lighter looks. We revisit 10 of the biggest trends from the ready-to-wear collections on the runways to make things a little easier as you do a wardrobe cleanse for the new season. If you are in a more tropical region, Spring/Summer 2016 looks might work the whole year through and you might have already started.

Leather

One material from winter that will live on into spring is leather. From skirts to dresses, jackets and even tops, leather will be cropping up in an array of colors. Brands such as Burberry Prorsum, Each & Other and Vionnet sported biker jackets while Trussardi showcased a yellow leather dress. Keeping up the trend of colorful leather, was Barbara Bui who rocked leather trousers in both black and pink.

Burberry Prorsum

Burberry Prorsum

Sheer Sensuality

Subtle sheer fabrics were another major trend to be seen for spring/summer 2016. Soft and sensual fabrics dominated at Givenchy where only certain parts of the body were shown. Similarly, Nina Ricci, Missioni and Akris sent models down the ramp essentially topless save for dark and sheer veils.

Missoni

Missoni

Color Kaleidoscope

There is no single stand-out color trend for this season. Brands brought a wide range of shades to the SS16 catwalks, from vivid hues (candy pink at Emporio Armani and almost fluorescent colors at Polo Ralph Lauren) to pastel shades, which were popular with almost all labels. Autumnal tones were spotted too, with camel and gray at Daks, as well as black and white combos at DKNY, Costume National, Margiela, Carven and Balenciaga. However, one noticeably popular color for the season is silver, with Iceberg, Jeremy Scott, Loewe and Iris Van Herpen showing this metallic shade in matte or iridescent versions.

Loewe

Loewe

Spring Stripes

While some labels rocked sailor chic – an ideal look for spring/summer – most opted for multi-colored stripes in sometimes psychedelic combinations. Whether vertical or horizontal, wide or super-fine, stripes of all kinds were seen on summer dresses, skirts, tops and pants in catwalk collections from the likes of Missoni, Salvatore Ferragamo and Dolce & Gabbana. Max Mara splashed stripes in yellow and white, Rochas went for oversized bands and Issey Miyake turned lines into waves.

Salvatore Ferragamo

Salvatore Ferragamo

Pop Prints, Quirky Patterns

Designers brought cartoons, drawings, pop prints and quirky slogans to the most feminine of ensembles this season. Jeremy Scott stamped garments with huge cartoon faces, while Lanvin rocked handbag and stiletto motifs and Giamba (Giambattista Valli) used a cheeky lipstick print. This trend offers a contrasting alternative with the season’s sensual and chic ensembles.

Lanvin

Lanvin

Boho-Chic

Womenswear also gets a stylish yet romantic, carefree and bohemian vibe this season, with jumpsuits, skirts and dresses with long, floaty cuts, in light shades or powdery pastels. This look was seen at Chloé, Paul & Joe and Giambattista Valli but in a fairly minor way. Tommy Hilfiger takes things further, matching boho looks with beanie hats, trainers and sunglasses with colored lenses.

Chloé

Chloé

Festival of Fringing

Last year’s fringing will be back in a big way for spring/summer 2016, with summer festivals offering strong inspiration for clothing and accessories. Key pieces will be finished in leather and, in particular, suede. MSGM, Roberto Cavalli, Carven, Balmain and Barbara Bui all brought fringes to various items in their womenswear collections. Balenciaga stood out from the crowd with fringed handbags.

Balenciaga

Balenciaga

Pajama Party

Last season’s pajama trend is even hotter for SS16. Dolce & Gabbana showed off pajama suits with characteristically big flower prints. Blumarine also used flowers as a more discreet addition to its oversized pajamas. Paco Rabanne opted for a lingerie-inspired look, rocking underwear as outerwear with a sportswear feel.

Blumarine

Blumarine

Military Detail

Although less present on the spring/summer runways than for autumn/winter 2015, military detail will continue as a trend for spring. As well as details such as chains and double-breasted cuts, the military look brings khaki shades to this season’s collections, with army greens seen at Rochas, Guy Laroche and Chalayan. Note, however, that camouflage is nowhere to be seen this season.

Chalayan

Chalayan

Short Styles

While skirts keep legs at least partially covered this season, shorts are sure to show them off. Several versions are in line for SS16, with loose-cut shorts and mini shorts at Giorgio Armani or frayed cut-offs at Alexander Wang. Paul & Joe kept things casual with laid-back denim shorts.

Alexander Wang

Alexander Wang

6 Heels Towering Over the Competition

This playful spread from our friends at L’Officiel Singapore caught our eye and we had to bring it to a wider audience. Having all these cool toys in the office (the actual toys, not the shoes) was as inspiring as these heels are high or quirky. Well, height alone maketh not any of these shoes. Instead, shape and structure play vital roles in defining the appeal here. Now, bask in the glory of footwear that should totally feature in a Lego movie!

Embossed python skin ankle boots, Michael Michael Kors.

Embossed python skin ankle boots, Michael Michael Kors. Photo by Ching; Art Direction Stephanie Lim; Styling Kames Narayanan

Details extended from the shoe’s front all the way to the back, the heel commands attention in exotic python (above) and a pop of color (below).

Leather pumps, Prada. Photo by Ching; Art Direction Stephanie Lim; Styling Kames Narayanan

Leather pumps, Prada. Photo by Ching; Art Direction Stephanie Lim; Styling Kames Narayanan

“Column Ring” leather thigh high boots, Loewe. Photography by Ching; Art Direction by Stephanie Lim; Styling by Kames Narayanan

“Column Ring” leather thigh high boots, Loewe. Photography by Ching; Art Direction by Stephanie Lim; Styling by Kames Narayanan

Taking a step back from the conventional pointed heel, designers stretch their imagination in geometrics.

“Sun Catcher” leather and perspex embroidered derby, Louis Vuitton. Photography by Ching; Art Direction by Stephanie Lim; Styling by Kames Narayanan

“Sun Catcher” leather and perspex embroidered derby, Louis Vuitton. Photography by Ching; Art Direction by Stephanie Lim; Styling by Kames Narayanan

“Kade” glitter leather ankle strap pumps, Jimmy Choo. Photography by Ching; Art Direction by Stephanie Lim; Styling by Kames Narayanan

“Kade” glitter leather ankle strap pumps, Jimmy Choo. Photography by Ching; Art Direction by Stephanie Lim; Styling by Kames Narayanan

A balancing act given the unusual shapes, these shoes are made for the bold who are not afraid of heights.

Suede cut-out ankle boots, Burberry Prorsum. Photography by Ching; Art Direction by Stephanie Lim; Styling by Kames Narayanan

Suede cut-out ankle boots, Burberry Prorsum. Photography by Ching; Art Direction by Stephanie Lim; Styling by Kames Narayanan

 

Story Credits

Art Direction by Stephanie Lim

Photography by Ching

Styling by Kames Narayanan

3 Fashion Designers to Follow in 2016

While 2015 is still on its last legs, the fashion industry has already turned its attention to 2016 and the next season’s runway shows which, in Paris, will start with menswear on January 20. This gives us an opportunity to start from scratch, and take a look at the designers and creative directors who will shape the fashion world next year.

Jonathan William Anderson

Jonathan Anderson or J.W. Anderson, who won the menswear and womenswear designer prizes at the most recent British Fashion Awards, has unquestionably been the designer of the last few seasons. At the head of his own brand J.W. Anderson (menswear and womenswear), but also as the creative director for Loewe, this Northern Ireland-born designer has already worked with the biggest luxury houses and ready-to-wear brands, including collaborations with Versus Versace and Topshop.

Nothing has been confirmed, but Jonathan Anderson could turn a new page in 2016, as his name was among the first mentioned as a replacement for Raf Simons at Christian Dior, along with Riccardo Tisci and Phoebe Philo. And even if that doesn’t happen, there is no doubt that the British designer will continue his dazzling ascent next year.

French designers Arnaud Vaillant et Sebastien Meyer speak to the public during the Courreges 2016 Spring/Summer ready-to-wear collection fashion show, on September 30, 2015 in Paris. AFP PHOTO / BERTRAND GUAY / AFP / BERTRAND GUAY

French designers Arnaud Vaillant et Sebastien Meyer speak to the public during the Courreges 2016 Spring/Summer ready-to-wear collection fashion show, on September 30, 2015 in Paris. AFP PHOTO / BERTRAND GUAY

Sébastien Meyer and Arnaud Vaillant

There is likely to be a lot of talk about this designer duo in 2016. As artistic directors for the Courrèges women’s ready-to-wear collections, Sébastien Meyer and Arnaud Vaillant delivered a successful first offering in September, at the Spring-Summer 2016 collections, but expectations about them will remain high at the next Fashion Week. This will give them an opportunity to show the direction in which they intend to take the brand (which was created in 1961), after an initial flirtation between tradition and modernity. It will be a real challenge for the duo, who have decided to devote themselves fully to Courrèges, leaving their own Coperni brand on stand-by.

Moroccan-born Israeli designer Alber Elbaz acknowledges the public at the end of the Lanvin's 2016 Spring/Summer ready-to-wear collection fashion show, on October 1, 2015 in Paris. AFP PHOTO / MIGUEL MEDINA

Moroccan-born Israeli designer Alber Elbaz acknowledges the public at the end of the Lanvin’s 2016 Spring/Summer ready-to-wear collection fashion show, on October 1, 2015 in Paris. AFP PHOTO / MIGUEL MEDINA

Alber Elbaz

This Israeli-American designer already had a major impact in 2015 and could do so again in 2016. Having spent 14 years at Lanvin, Alber Elbaz stepped down as the brand’s creative director at the end of October 2015, causing an earthquake in the fashion world as well as at Lanvin itself. It remains to be seen what the future holds for this famous designer who has received many awards for his work. For now, the latest news has it that a French court has ruled somewhat in favor of Elbaz’ supporters in the ever escalating row.

Rumors quickly surfaced of a move to Christian Dior, but this has not been confirmed by Elbaz or the French fashion house, and other names such as the designer Jonathan Anderson have been cited as a possible replacement for Raf Simons. In any case, Alber Elbaz is not likely to be inactive for long. The bets are on.

Interview: Barbara Palvin

Barbara Palvin may have just turned 22 this month but she already has five years of modeling experience and a slew of campaigns and commercials in her bag. That’s a lot more than what her peers in the business can say. A frequent face in beauty, the doe-eyed Hungarian got her big break in 2011 as the face of Chanel Beauty, but it was her contract with L’Oreal that launched her career, turning her into a face seen nearly everywhere, from drugstores and movie theatres to towering billboards across the world. You may not remember it, but chances are you probably have seen one of her campaigns.

While modeling is her main game, Palvin has dabbled in acting – she made a cameo appearance in Brett Ratner’s Hercules (2014) – a career she may pursue when she leaves the modeling industry. In person, the baby-faced model is as bubbly and easy-going as you’d expect her to be, but there are also hints of a certain maturity that surpasses her young age. Here, Palvin opens up about acting, bad press, beauty, not being “very good” on the runway and secret talents (you’ll never guess what it is).

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Wool coat with fox fur sleeves, Marni. Lambskin bodysuit, Alexander Wang. Nappa leather boots, Givenchy By Riccardo Tisci. Fishnet stocking (worn throughout), Saint Laurent

So, you started modeling at a young age. Did you have any concerns back then?

No, I didn’t have any problems. It was easy. My mum was travelling with me everywhere so I wasn’t even alone, even when I went to Japan. She was helping me a lot, even on photo shoots. If there ever was something I didn’t want to do, she’d be there to help me, but that has never really happened.

Do you have any advice for young models that are just starting out?

When I did shows, my first two seasons were really good, but then it started to not work out because I was considered short, and I started to feel that modeling was not for me. I almost gave up. So, what I’m saying is, don’t give up, even when you don’t get a job straightaway because there will be ups and downs, and that’s normal.

You’ve worked with many photographers over your career. Is there one that stands out?

Jack [Waterlot]! What can I say? I mean, come on! [Laughs]

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Wool tailcoat with Marmot fur stole, Givenchy By Riccardo Tisci. Polyamid elastane bralette, Bordelle

What about runway shows?

My first Chanel show. I was crying. It was at the Grand Palais, there was live music and it was just so beautiful. It was just such an intense experience.

You don’t do many shows now, though.

It’s partly because I’m not very good at it. I’m not very tall or skinny. I don’t have the runway look. It’s also a personal choice because I always ended up being disappointed and that’s not good for my confidence. I did just do the Chanel show in Korea though! It was good to be back on the runway. If [Chanel] asks me to do a show, I do it with no questions asked.

You were in the film Hercules alongside Dwayne Johnson. Do you plan to go into acting soon?

Yeah…and no. [Laughs] Like, I want to do it, I want to try it, but acting is different, for sure. In L’Oreal, we act a little bit for the commercials and if you’re a model, you have to be a good actress because you can’t just stand there with just one look. For example, you’ve got a rock ‘n’ roll look on, you don’t just stand there looking like a little girl, you have to get into the mood.

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Wool tailcoat with Marmot fur stole, Givenchy By Riccardo Tisci

How many more years do you see yourself in modeling?

With this baby face? [Laughs] I think I really want to get it out, maximize the time I have left. So, I’d say two more years? Following that, I see myself having two options. Either I have a family and a husband and have my own business maybe, or become an actress but still have a husband, just no kids.

You’re friends with many Hollywood celebrities and tabloids 
have brought you into their drama before. How do you deal with all this negativity?

Well, you know, my family and friends know what’s true, and that’s all I care about. I mean, there were some moments when I had enough of the hate and I snapped and said something, but I’ve learned that it’s better to just leave it.

Do you have paparazzi following you around?

It depends. For example, in Japan, they know when I’m coming so they will be there. It doesn’t happen all the time though; I’m pretty good at hiding.

Jack-Waterlot_062115_0180FINAL

Patchwork shearling leather coat and lambskin sheath dress, Calvin Klein Collection

You’ve been in the industry for many years. Do you think you’ve changed as a person?

I’m definitely more mature, but I don’t think I’ve changed very much. I’m the same stupid little girl that I was and still am when I’m at home.

You’ve fronted a lot of beauty campaigns. What are the products you absolutely swear by?

I love the Miss Manga Mascara by L’Oreal. That’s my favourite. Hmm, what do I love? I love the Infallible Pro-Matte Foundation, that’s the newest one. Every time they bring out a new one, I’m like, “Wow, this is even better!” and another one comes along and I’m like, “This is even better!” [Laughs] I always use the Hydrafresh range as well.

Do you have any beauty secrets?

I don’t know, I don’t really have any. I do try to keep my skin clean. I don’t wear makeup if I don’t have to.

What about secret talents?

I’m a good cook! And I love singing and I play soccer. The last time I was asked this question, I couldn’t answer and I was like, “F—k! This is my secret talent?” It just doesn’t come to mind very easily.

Jack-Waterlot_062115_0303FINAL

Metallic silk triacetate pleat dress with high collar, LOEWE.  Patent leather pumps with skinny square stiletto heels, Saint laurent

I’ve heard that you love to read.

I love reading. That’s my talent! I read 400 pages in one day. I’m a very quick reader. I was in Bangkok recently and I had two books, about 700 pages, and I finished it in two days. Oh, wait – I remember another secret talent now! I’m good at remembering numbers. I’m super good with numbers. If someone gave me an address or a telephone number, say two months ago, I’d still remember it.

Is there anything you wish you had done differently if you weren’t a model?

I wish I went to college. I didn’t really have a chance because I was signed with L’Oreal when I had just finished high school, so I got really busy. I was doing a lot of Victoria’s Secret stuff as well. But, I mean, I can still do it, and I want to do it. I want to study law.

Story Credits

Photography by Jack Waterlot

Styling Jumius Wong and Jack Wang

Hair: Fernando Torrent/L’Atelier NYC

Makeup: Yumi Lee/L’Atelier NYC using L’Oreal

Manicurist : Yukie Miyakawa / Kate Ryan Inc.

Photography Assistant: Herman Van Den Brandt

Styling Assistants: Erin McSherry & Jingni Oh

Model: Barbara Palvin/IMG

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Radzmire coat, Prada

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Python skin double-breasted pea coat, miu miu. Stretch thigh-high boots in printed vinyl with translucent heel, Dior. Harness dress with oversized rings in 18K gold, Bordelle

Acids handbag collection

Loewe launches the Acids collection

On the heels of its collection designed in partnership with Junya Watanabe, Loewe has presented a new range of handbags in vibrant, eye-catching colors. The collection hits stores this January.

Drawing inspiration from the peacock, one of the brand’s signature symbols, Loewe chose a range of showy electric colors for this handbag collection, highlighting its expertise in the art of leather dyeing.

Acids handbag collection

The Spanish luxury brand has chosen flashy colors ranging from electric blue to neon green, along with fire truck red and sunshine yellow. All of the items in the “Acids” collection are accented with gold details (locks, clasps and rings).

While Loewe’s official brand ambassador is Spanish actress Penelope Cruz, the brand has chosen to present this latest collection on its own, next to a statue of the peacock that inspired it.

Loewe’s Acids collection will be available in select stores from January 2014.

Loewe Fall Winter 2013

Penelope and Monica Cruz turn bag designers for Loewe

Loewe Fall Winter 2013

The Spanish luxury goods label has joined forces with sisters Penelope and Monica Cruz to design a new handbag, set to be unveiled in November.

Spanish actress Penelope Cruz stars in a new Loewe advertising campaign shot by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggot on the roof of the Casino de Madrid in the Spanish capital. It’s the second campaign featuring the star who inked a three-year endorsement deal with Loewe in November 2012.

Loewe also took the opportunity to announce a new collaboration with Penélope and her dancer sister Mónica Cruz who will design a new bag, set to appear in November. The siblings created the cross-body bag which features outside pockets bag with British creative director Stuart Vevers.

penelope cruz Loewe Fall Winter 2013

“We wanted to do something special but also practical, and we wanted the design to have an unmistakable Spanish element,” Penelope told WWD. The sisters’ collection will also feature coin purses and large zip wallets.

The bag is one of the last projects for 39-year-old Vevers who is departing Loewe to take up his new post as creative director of Coach.

penelope cruz Loewe Fall 2013