Tag Archives: Christian Dior

Dior Celebrates 70 Years With New Book Collection

For its 70th anniversary, the illustrious fashion house Dior will be releasing a series of reference books. Each book will be dedicated to a popular designer who has worked under the House of Dior over the years.

The first, will feature Christian Dior who founded his eponymous label back in 1946. Following books will celebrate designers such as Yves Saint Laurent, who took over after the death of Dior in 1957; Marc Bohan was another designer who led the brand when Saint Laurent was called up for military service in 1960. The fourth book will feature Gianfranco Ferré who was the first Italian to lead the French brand in 1989.

John Galliano, who happens to be the most controversial creative director of the seven, will be featured in the fifth reference book. Galliano took on the role in 1996 but was dismissed in 2011 over alleged anti-Semitic remarks. The sixth volume will focus on Belgian designer Raf Simons who was the Creative Director from 2012 to 2015 while the final volume will feature Maria Grazia Chiuri who joined the brand in July this year.

Shot by photographer Laziz Hamani and accompanied with text by Olivier Saillard, the first volume of the series will be titled ‘Dior by Christian Dior’. The book is said to be the “ultimate compendium” of the most iconic haute couture designs by Dior himself. The publication will serve as a complete chronology of the designer’s work at the house, from his groundbreaking debut Spring/Summer 1947 collection famously known as the “New Look,” to his final ‘Fuseau’ Fall/Winter 1957 line. Featuring fashion pieces conserved in museums and institutions from around the world, the first series is set to be released next month while the remaining six will be published by Assouline between 2017 and 2018.

Comme des Garçons

Aesthetic Debt: What High Fashion Owes Asia

Who says fashion exists in its own bubble? Designers and houses today are, more than ever, drawing inspiration and references from all over the world. Nowhere is this more apparent than in high fashion’s relationship with the East. The seductive Orient has long been a goldmine for decorative touches. Christian Dior’s love of the East led him to create a dress – in the beautiful New Look silhouette with its nipped waist and elaborate volume – covered in Japanese scribble lifted from an old print. The words? Something about bowel movements and a tummy ache. A funny yet telling example, if there were one, about the results of good intentions and unwitting execution.

Gladly, designers today have the luxury of research and the availability of a global world view (thank you, Google) that’s resulted in a more intelligent way of mining the East for inspiration – and it’s one that should be celebrated. The New York Metropolitan Museum of Art’s 2015 key exhibition, China: Through the Looking Glass, was a significant showcase of the East’s influences on fashion. What it achieved was a plain demonstration that China has had an aesthetic influence on virtually every high fashion designer. The “looking glass” element to the exhibition, however, should be a strong reminder that China and indeed the rest of Asia aren’t far-away oriental mysteries. Its relevance and influence almost demand that designers picking references do so with intelligent sensitivity rather than with reductive pastiche.

Japan in Paris

Maison Margiela

Maison Margiela

Two of the most important Japanese designers – Rei Kawakubo and Yohji Yamamoto – have been in the business for upwards of 40 years, with starts in the 1970s and 1980s. It’s intriguing to assess their aesthetics and impact on the industry. We must remember that the two were so influential and notable in Paris fashion because of the contrariness of what they were showing. When Western – that is, Euro-centric – fashion built dresses around the glamorous, sexualised female body, Kawakubo and Yamamoto stormed in and offered inventive forms, silhouettes, cuts, and an insistent use of the colour black. Indeed, the Yamamoto brand has been revered for its masterful craftsmanship, protective embrace of the body, and an intelligence that builds a sense of safety for the wearer – clothes as the proverbial armour.

Kawakubo, too, gained fame for being unrelentingly herself. Comme des Garçons has become a model brand (pictured top) with its numerous offshoot lines – Junya Watanabe, Noir Kei Ninomiya and Ganryu are all by Kawakubo’s protégés – and the opinion-leading Dover Street Market stores. The underpinning artistic strength remains the Comme des Garçons mainline designed by Kawakubo herself, which has been unfailingly unique, daring and avant-garde.

Kenzo today represents upbeat accessibility thanks to creative directors Carol Lim and Humberto Leon. The Opening Ceremony founders bring a commercial New York line of thought to the brand that keeps it in line with the founder’s original spirit. The man himself, Kenzo Takada, opened his boutique in Paris, named Jungle Jap, selling his bright and fun multicultural prints. One of the key pillars of Kenzo fashion is a sense of fun and youth. Soon, Kenzo will launch a collaborative collection with H&M, one in a series of special edition releases with the likes of brands like Lanvin, Maison Martin Margiela, Balmain, Isabel Marant and Karl Lagerfeld. Onward to the future, indeed.

Speaking of the future, one must never forget the Japanese brand that pushed technical and creative boundaries. Issey Miyake is important to fashion because of his loving embrace of technology and the brand’s explorations of the form and function of dress. Miyake’s earliest works were built around the Japanese kimono, deconstructing the traditional garment to get to the core of what makes foldable garments work. Toying with dimensionality, he developed a line of clothes that were softly sculptural. His famous heat-pressed pleating technique birthed the Pleats Please line, and the shaped yet draped silhouette has been unique since. In the FW16 collection, current creative director Yoshiyuki Miyamae pays respectful homage with garments constructed with pleating techniques that the brand calls “baked stretched” and “3D steam-stretched”. The brand remains, in its spirit, venturous in exploring the effect of technology on fabric and garment construction.

Cultural Influences

Valentino

Valentino

The highest echelons of fashion owe an aesthetic debt to Asia. The original greats from Paris such as Christian Dior, Yves Saint Laurent, Paul Poiret, Madeleine Vionnet and Coco Chanel took inspirations from various facets of chinoiserie and japonism. There’s an element of pastiche that can’t be disregarded, though one can chalk it down to the times. Yves Saint Laurent paid tribute, in the 1970s, to cheongsam and qipao silhouettes, topped with hats and jackets inspired by imperial Chinese dress. In Tom Ford’s final collection for the house in the fall of 2004, such looks were amplified to highlight sensuality and sexual boldness. The figure-hugging and high-slit clothes demonstrated Ford’s high-octane sex-sells mentality and his ability to subvert traditional dress forms to suit the times.

Coco Chanel was a famously enamored collector of lacquered coromandel screens from China, and decorated her home and offices in Rue Cambon with more than 30 of them. Karl Lagerfeld’s collections have built on the obsession, most notably with a 2009 Métiers d’Art show in Shanghai that played to his strength of combining the heritage of Chanel with the needs of modern women. The result: a modern Chinese attitude worn with the insouciant bouclé skirt suits of the house. Lagerfeld then took a journey to India in the Paris-Bombay Métiers d’Art 2012 show: traditional Indian dress styles such as salwar trousers (voluminous pants which taper sharply near the ankles) and kurti (long, tunic-length blouses) got paired with Chanel’s iconic pearls and tweeds. When it comes to making references, Lagerfeld is a master; there’s an ease to the mix that belies deep research and finesse in construction.

John Galliano furthered Dior’s love of the Orient when he was designing for the house with the famously splendid SS07 and SS09 haute couture shows. Spring of 2007 saw modern geishas in chartreuse-, lavender- and rose-hued Bar silhouettes cut in silk-taffeta with an origami-style twist. In 2009, the ubiquitous willow pattern on Chinese ceramics sneaked under the linings, on the insides, and around the outsides of the dresses – a delicacy to the clothes lent by invoking a key product of trade that China has shared with the West for centuries.

Today’s Take

Valentino

Valentino

Modern couturiers play a more nuanced game of reference-picking. Consider Valentino’s Spring 2016 haute couture showing. The silhouettes and thrust of the look was the otherworldly and ultra-feminine signature that Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli have become acclaimed for. Kimono-style coats and robes with hand-painted carps and dragons draw from the mythological wellspring of the East. This followed the visual story in the brand’s Pre-Fall 2016 collection which featured hand-painted and intarsia-ed dragons and swallows, pyjamas with brocaded swans, and shift dresses with genteel 10th-century bird-and-flower paintings.

In Gucci’s FW16 collection, Alessandro Michele sent a dizzying number of 70 looks down his runway. The Michele method is to create for a variety of women – different characters daring to partake of and play in dress-up characterisation. Two Asian-informed looks strolled down the runway: the first, a minidress with an Italian sun motif and a Mao collar; the second, a floor-length qipao with pink fur trim on the sleeves and an embroidered phoenix pattern.

At Louis Vuitton and Kenzo, the brands looked towards a cartoon idealisation of women. Nicolas Ghesquière has one of the best knacks in the industry for tapping into youthful energy and giving it a sophisticated turn. Recall Spring 2016’s advertising campaign: the virtual avatar of Lightning (one of the lead characters in the Final Fantasy games) swings around a bag, strikes poses and looks airbrushed to perfection. It is worth noting that the Lightning character in the games is a combatant – the strongest playable character, even. This is reflected in the clothes, too: the urban-heroine sensibility is carried into FW16’s exaggerated silhouettes, emphasis on heavy boots, panelled bodysuits and armour-like leather bustiers. At Kenzo, the train of thought was Sailor Moon, beloved ’90s shōjo icon of female liberation and strength. It took the spirit of confidence and quintessential femininity, and translated it into an abundance of empire waistlines and deconstructed duffel coats with a smattering of reworked archival iris, dandelion and tiger prints (Kenzo is known for its print work).

Dior

Dior

On a more technical front, we look back to Raf Simons’ debut haute couture collection for Dior in the Fall 2012 season. The collection saw Simons impose abstract Sterling Ruby prints onto coats and dresses using an Indonesian technique seen through a French eye. The original technique ikat is an early form of warp printing. Warp printing involves dyeing the fabric on the yarn before it is woven, as opposed to traditional methods in which a print is stamped onto a finished yard of fabric. The resulting print is warbly and far from sharp, and – to quote Mr Simons – “has the quality of a brush stroke”. In the 18th century, this was the same quality that led to the French creation of Chiné a la Branche, a variation on the ikat print technique that produced small, watercolor-esque floral prints on silk taffeta fabrics that found favour and fashion on the backs of Marie Antoinette and her contemporaries.

Today, what Asia represents for luxury and high fashion is fertile ground for growth and exploration. The massive Chinese economy offers opportunities for growth with a huge consumer base longing for the prestige and sheen of luxury. What fashion designers have to remember, then, is to pay their audiences back with the beauty they’ve borrowed.

This article was first published in L’Officiel Singapore.

Maria Grazia Chiuri; Anthony Vaccarello; Bouchra Jarrar

3 Fashion Designers to Follow Fall 2016

In 2015 and 2016, the top names in fashion moved around so much or simply vacated their positions that the term “musical chairs” became overused in the ensuing press reports. Semantics aside, radical changes are the order of the day given how much disruption is hitting the fashion world. Perhaps new blood at the top will provide an infusion of vigor at some of the storied couture names. In short, all eyes will be on Paris for the 2017 spring-summer shows as the first collections of some of these new designers debut.

Maria Grazia Chiuri

Maria Grazia Chiuri

The pressure is on for the newly appointed Dior creative director, who presents her first collection for the luxury brand September 30. Competition for front-row seats at the show, which has everything it takes to arouse the curiosity of fashion addicts, will likely be fierce – all the more so because Chiuri is the first-ever woman to occupy the post of creative director at the Parisian fashion house.

After more than 20 years of working for Valentino in collaboration with Pierpaolo Piccioli, the Italian designer was officially appointed by Dior on July 8 to take over from Raf Simons, who left the French fashion house to move to Calvin Klein in October 2015.

At the upcoming Dior show, attention will be particularly focused on the accessories, which are one of Chiuri’s specialties.

Anthony Vaccarello

Anthony Vaccarello

The Belgian designer became the driving force for renewal at Yves Saint Laurent Paris, following the departure of previous artistic director Hedi Slimane last April. Taking over from Slimane, who did much to reposition the French brand, will represent a considerable challenge for Anthony Vaccarello. His first show for the luxury French fashion house will also be the center of attention, because it will doubtless be an introduction to a new look that is expected to replace Slimane’s somber rock style with a simpler, sensual and more feminine silhouette.

If the schedule for Paris Fashion Week allows, Yves Saint Laurent may opt to make a splash by holding its show on the first day so as to focus the spotlight on its new artistic director.

Bouchra Jarrar

Bouchra Jarrar

The third major French fashion house to rethink its artistic direction, Lanvin has called on the services of French designer Bouchra Jarrar, who took charge of womenswear collections when she replaced Alber Elbaz. The forty-year-old, who has collaborated with such major labels as Christian Lacroix and Balenciaga, will take center stage when she presents her first collection for Lanvin, which has been hotly anticipated by the public and business professionals alike.

Masanori Morikawa FW16

Interview: Masanori Morikawa for Christian Dada

One sits up when one gets wind of a brand with a name that riffs on Dior and the absurdist Dada movement. A name like that speaks volumes about the label’s intent: high and low meet to play on established tropes – one of the ordered world of haute couture and the other of the purposefully senseless and disorderly realm of post-war art.

The story the clothes tell is one of the street fused with classical fashion silhouettes. What Christian Dada is, then, is a story of the old and the new, the young and the old, the submissive and the rebellious.

Its new store in Singapore is emblematic of that. Following interest and backing from local investment group D’League, the brand has been able to establish its first retail flagship outside of Japan: a spacious, modern and black-heavy store on Orchard Road. Black perforated metal is folded angularly to form seats that look like rocks. The idea here is a Japanese zen garden – a symbol of Japanese calm amid punk modernity.

Christian Dada got its start in 2010 with roots in repurposing vintage garments through an almost Helmut Lang type of lens. The brand has since grown to become a Tokyo fashion week presence and having a place on the Paris fashion week schedule.

The man behind the brand: Masanori Morikawa, whose design talents lie mainly in his graphic punchiness, level of craft (the embroidery work on Christian Dada pieces are a standout) and an ability to simultaneously fuse two things the French have struggled with – rock-n-roll and high fashion. Here, we pick apart – with the man himself – what makes the Dada brand tick.

Masanori Morikawa FW16

How did you get into fashion?

My grandparents were in the embroidery business, so my interest in fashion grew very organically. I attended a fashion school in Japan and then I worked under Charles Anastase in London.

How did it feel to show your collection at Paris fashion week?

I am still in the learning phase, but I don’t see anyone else who is showing a collection at my age. So I feel like I could be a beacon for a younger generation, and that means a lot to me.

You showed your women’s collection at Tokyo to commemorate the launch of the line. What do you think about fashion week in Japan compared to Paris?

I think there are so many things in Japan that need work. Timing is one thing – they’re showing too late. Another thing is that now anybody and everybody can join and show their collections in Tokyo regardless of the level of their creations, which should be changed in order to make it better.

Masanori Morikawa FW16

You’ve said before that Japonist clothing is worn only by non-Japanese people. Why do you think that is?

Japanese people in general, tend to think Japonism is old-school. Having said that, it is now becoming a trend and I feel like people, even the Japanese, are more open to it.

Who do you design for – is there a Christian Dada muse?

Of course I think about fans who wear Christian Dada, but if I think about it too much, my creations will lose their focus. To avoid that, I design for myself – just as I like it. I’d rather get inspiration from interesting things that are happening around me.

What would you say is a Christian Dada design signature?

It is imperfect and ever-changing daily.

What are you currently obsessed with?

To find clothing to match my loafers.

What kind of clothing do you absolutely hate?

Clothes without love.

Masanori Morikawa FW16

This story was originally published in L’Officiel Singapore

 

 

 

Lucky Dior Signet Rings

While others have ventured away from signet rings, Dior has given the concept a new twist with the Lucky Dior collection. In white, rose and yellow gold, the signet rings are a perfect fit for those looking to invest in a talisman that is both symbolic yet versatile.lucky_dior_bee_.59913103008.h0

Along with a precious stone, the luxury French brand incorporates symbols that hold special meaning to the house of Dior. Take for instance the bee that represents the Christian Dior seamstresses against the deep black onyx or the lily of the valley that has long been associated with Mr Dior. Other designs that make up the collection include a clover to represent good luck that is set against amazonite as well as a star that was also important to Christian Dior against a radiant brown stone.lucky_dior_rose.3bcbc103137.h0

The oval, which reminds us of the famous armchairs laid out for guests at catwalk shows, is another symbol that has been put in ring form. In this new collection, it is combined with fluorite, which is associated with protection. The initials CD, for Christian Dior of course, are a key part of the collection, and have been set against a red coral backdrop. The rose is an important symbol for the fashion house and was therefore an obvious inclusion in the collection. In this case, the queen of flowers, which reminds us of the designer’s childhood garden in Granville, is set against a navy blue lapis.

The pairings prove to be a unique mix of the brand’s history and symbolisim that produce a radiant Lucky Dior collection that is sure to add some character to an outfit.

Archi Dior Fine Jewelry 2016: Architectural Spirit

Two years ago, Victoire de Castellane introduced the world to the Archi Dior Fine Jewelry Collection. The designs translated each couture line by the French fashion house into elegant accessories that captured the essence of Dior. “I wanted to be an architect; but as a couturier I am obliged to follow the laws and principles of architecture,” explained Christian Dior. The collection was created to honor Dior who incorporated elements of architecture to his creations — a design technique the fashion house still uses today.Cocotte-Archi-Dior-fine-jewelry

This year the collection adds eight more designs that are inspired by the brand’s Cocotte houndstooth dress that was first created in 1948 as well as the Milieu du Sièle line that was first showcased in 1949. From the Cocotte houndstooth dress, Castellane featured the asymmetric hem (which saw more volume swept to the back of the dress) in an asymmetric ring and necklace made of white gold and diamonds (above).Milieu-du-Siele-archi-dior

With the Milieu du Dièle line, the designer incorporated the geometry that was seen in the fabric, into the jewelry designs. The inspiration is seen in a selection that includes a gold and diamond necklace, two pairs of white gold and diamond earrings along with three rings made of white gold and diamonds and rose gold (with or without diamonds). The result is an interesting mix to the collection that caters to the woman who has a love for fine jewelry but also has a wish to venture away from the cookie-cutter creations that manages to remain true to the ethos of the brand.

For more information, visit Dior.

Luxe Functionality: Mister Dior Bag

Who says style and practicality are mutually exclusive? Not Dior Homme. Congruent to the Maison’s code of luxe functionality, the label entices us with yet another form-meets-style bag collection: the Mister Dior.

Citing founder Christian Dior’s taste for globetrotting as an influence, the collection comes in two document holders and one messenger bag. The best thing? The bags are fully intended for all-day use, and can fit one’s laptops or tablets. We can’t wait to meet you, Mister Dior.

Read more about the collection on Men’s Folio Singapore.

London Love Letter: Dior Cruise 2017

Another major fashion house has showcased its Cruise collection, this time in London. Dior, the Parisian brand that recently announced the opening of its largest London store and new ambassador, is in the news again with its brand new collection. Bringing back a touch of the 1950s, the Maison treated guests to a whirlwind journey from London to Blenheim Palace before the show.

To learn more about the Dior Cruise 2017 collection, click here.

Dior Welcomes Bella Hadid, Opens London Store

Dior is on a roll this week, with two major announcements: ingenue Bella Hadid as makeup ambassador and its newest and largest ever store, in London. First up, we look at model Bella Hadid, whom the French brand sees as quite the pretty picture as its latest makeup ambassador. The American model joins Jennifer Lawrence who is currently the face of Dior Addict.

The advertorial campaign will be her biggest solo venture to date, and is proof of her ability to be more than just a shadow of her famous sibling and friends. For her new role, she will appear in a series of online videos. Due out June 6, the first video will see her discuss her favorite beauty products with Dior’s in-house creative director and image director, Peter Phillips. Apart from being the new ambassador of the brand’s makeup, Hadid will also be seen on the runway as she walks for Dior’s Cruise Collection show in, wait for it, London.Bond-Street-London-Dior-Store-Opening

The second announcement this week by Dior is the opening of its largest store in London. Located at New Bond Street in the city’s Mayfair district, the four-story building will house several elements by the brand under one roof. Apart from the women’s ready-to-wear collections, accessories, jewelry and timepieces, the store will also carry the brand’s Baby Dior and children’s wear sections. The space will also feature a Dior Homme area that will offer a demi-measure service and three private salons for VIP clients who wish to enjoy their shopping experience.

Other highlights of the store opening include the Dior Home collection that will offer crystal glassware collections embellished with gold couture stitching and limited edition collaborative pieces fabricated with artists and designers. To commemorate the occasion, Dior will unveil limited edition Lady Dior bags and small leather accessories. The interior of the store will highlight the blend of British charm with the brand’s French history. The décor will see stone matched with silk carpets and neo-Louis XVI-style furniture.

The House of Dior will open its doors on June 3

Final Cut: 4 Red Carpet Trends Cannes 2016

Ah the red carpet and the beautiful women, designer gowns and gems worth millions drawn to it. It takes some time to sift through the images and galleries to find the trends that we know you love but someone has to do it.

We covered the yellow trend starting strong on opening night and you would be forgiven for overlooking several other trends. As the festival continued, the designers sent their best designs out and we were treated to more trends. We take a look at the four trends you may have missed.

Best Foot Forward

From left: Karlie Kloss (Marchesa gown with Chopard jewelry); Bella Hadid (Alexandre Vauthier gown); Alessandra Ambrosio (Redemption gown and Boucheron Jewelry); Izabel Goulart (Alexandre Vauthier gown); Ana Beatriz Barros (Ralph and Russo gown). Images from Runway Manhattan.

From left: Karlie Kloss (Marchesa gown with Chopard jewelry); Bella Hadid (Alexandre Vauthier gown); Alessandra Ambrosio (Redemption gown and Boucheron Jewelry); Izabel Goulart (Alexandre Vauthier gown); Ana Beatriz Barros (Ralph and Russo gown). Images from Runway Manhattan.

You could call Angelina Jolie the pioneer of leg flashers since she did bring this trend back in vogue at the Oscars in 2013. Three years on and it is far from over. In fact, if Bella Hadid’s dress is any indication, the slits just keep getting higher… Of course, these are models we speak of so naturally they really do have some of the best gams in the world. Just like those slits, where they end no one knows…

Belle of the Ball

From left: Blake Lively (Vivienne Westwood gown); Elle Fanning (Valentino gown); Jourdan Dunn (Ralph and Russo gown). Images from Runway Manhattan.

From left: Blake Lively (Vivienne Westwood gown); Elle Fanning (Valentino gown); Jourdan Dunn (Ralph and Russo gown). Images from Runway Manhattan.

We fell in love with several of these dresses that would have been a young girl’s fantasy. From Blake Lively in her Cinderella-esque gown to Elle Fanning who looked whimsical, the fairy-tale princesses made the red carpet their own and the pictures didn’t disappoint.

The Naked Dress

From left: Blake Lively (Atelier Versace gown); Kendall Jenner (Cavalli Couture gown); Bella Hadid (Cavalli Couture gown). Images from Runway Manhattan.

From left: Blake Lively (Atelier Versace gown); Kendall Jenner (Cavalli Couture gown); Bella Hadid (Cavalli Couture gown). Images from Runway Manhattan.

There are nude colored dresses and then there are the naked dresses. As risky to wear as the thigh-high slits, this requires a certain amount of bravado —and the confidence to go commando — to pull off. While some chose to use strategically placed panels to pull off this look, others went all out.

Suit Up

From left: Susan Sarandon (Saint Laurent suit); Victoria Beckham (Victoria Beckham Jumpsuit and Chopard jewelry); Charlize Theron (Christian Dior Couture and Cartier jewelry). Images from Runway Manhattan.

From left: Susan Sarandon (Saint Laurent suit); Victoria Beckham (Victoria Beckham Jumpsuit and Chopard jewelry); Charlize Theron (Christian Dior Couture and Cartier jewelry). Images from Runway Manhattan.

This one made us wonder if Barney Stinson decided to switch professions and dress Hollywood for a change. This look proved to be more controversial than the high slits or the naked dress. With a strict rule in place for all, the stars were expected to turn up in black tie appropriate attire and some of the ladies decided to walk the path less traveled. Forgoing the heavy gowns, Susan Sarandon and Victoria Beckham led the way in standing the dress code on its head with their pantsuits. While we think they looked just as elegant on the red carpet as anyone in a frock this year, if you take a look at the background, you’ll see why this generally is not a great idea. On that note, yes even the photographers at these events follow the dress code.

Ballroom Watch: Dior VIII Grand Bal

The Dior VIII Grand Bal wristwatch evokes the allure of the French house in more ways than one. For starters, the timepiece is named after Monsieur Christian Dior’s favorite number, eight. Then comes the unrivalled attention to artistic detail which the ticker is given (it has been painstakingly decorated in remarkable marquetries of vibrant-coloured feathers, mother-of-pearl and gems, for instance). And, finally, if you still can’t picture it, just know that the Swiss-made watch, like many of Dior’s creations, is one of luxury’s most captivating and memorable.

But the beauty of the Dior VIII Grand Bal is rather unusual. While most automatic watches are equipped with a rotor – a heavy, semi-circular metal disc which swivels freely with movements of the arm to wind the calibre – at the back, Dior has cleverly adapted the moving part as a decorative yet fully-functioning element on the timepiece’s dial. And as the oscillating weight rotates, it recalls the dramatic twirls of an elegant ball gown.

Not just any ball gown, though, but pleated petticoats and a dress from Dior’s Spring/Summer 2015 haute couture collection. The former is exquisitely translated as rotors in lacquered pink or yellow gold with white mother-of-pearl and diamond accents, while the single rotor in the latter, in white gold, is gently applied with soft feathers and finished with tsavorite garnets and sapphires. In a first for Dior, these precious mechanical rotors now come housed in steel models of the Dior VIII Grand Bal which are more accessible than its predecessors in gold, but no less brilliant in appearance.

This story was first published in L’Officiel Singapore.

Paris Luxury Stores to Open Sunday

As a visitor to Paris, Sundays have always been an excellent time to take in the scenery because the stores are closed – well, not anymore because the city’s top luxury stores will be throwing open their doors from this weekend onwards.

Tourists flocking to the French capital will now be able shop at luxury shops that line the Champs Elysees and the Place Vendome on Sundays as a key government reform comes into effect.

An agreement between luxury shops and employee unions on Sunday hours has come into force, said Sylvie Zawadzki, who heads up tax and social issues at the French Fashion Federation.

The deal allows shops to take advantage of a reform pushed through by Economy Minister Emmanuel Macron last year allowing for shops to open on Sundays in newly created international tourist zones in Paris.

Sunday openings for shops in France is severely restricted.

“It is an agreement that provides companies the possibility to open (on Sundays) but it is a decision they take based on their commercial strategy,” said Zawadzki.

The flagship shops of luxury brands such as Chanel, Christian Dior and Louis Vuitton are covered by the deal.

Zawadzki declined to say how many companies are concerned, but according to the business daily Les Echos some 30 brands and nearly 100 shops could now open.

Other international tourist zones cover the central part of Paris, including the area where many of the city’s top department stores are located, including Galeries Lafayette. So far only one, BHV, has reached a deal with its employees.

Dior Charms with Rose des Vents Jewelry

Despite popular belief, the Dior Rose des Vents jewelry collection is not named after a rose but an old maritime navigational tool. Inspired by bits of Christian Dior’s life: his childhood villa in Granville was named Les Rhumbs, an old maritime word for the points of the compass; his lucky number is eight (reflected in the eight-pronged star), and he saw a lucky star outside the British Embassy before opening his own couture house.

DIOR---ROSE-DES-VENTS---EN

This season, the Joaillerie collection sees Victoire de Castellane incorporating rose gold, onyx and diamonds to the range of pendants and rings. The refined gold rope that snakes around the finger is a nod to nautical influences, while the stones – turquoise and Lapis Lazuli – reflect the sea both at day and night. In a shape of a medallion, which is a symbol of travel, the pieces are also reversible, a useful feature if you’re looking for extra mileage out of your fine jewelry.

Read more about the collection at L’Officielsingapore.com.

Off Runway: Tribute to Women in Dior

If you have ever wondered about all the famous figures to have worn Christian Dior since 1947, you should turn to France’s Christian Dior Museum, which is holding a special exhibition on just that subject. Housed in the iconic fashion designer’s childhood home in Granville, Normandy, the summer exhibition entitled “Women in Dior – Sublime Elegance of a Portrait,” (Femmes en Dior – Sublime elegance d’un portrait) runs from May 5 to September 25, 2016.

The exhibition pays homage to the stylish women – princesses, First Ladies, fashion icons, movie stars, musicians and more – who have worn garments designed by the French fashion house, exploring the relationship between the different Dior pieces and their famous wearers.

After being sketched by the designer, crafted in the atelier and presented at the traditional catwalk shows, haute-couture garments are carefully chosen by the women of the world. Selections are made in function of tastes and personalities or with specific events in mind.

“Women in Dior – Sublime Elegance of a Portrait,” organized by fashion historian and curator Florence Müller, honors these famous figures and the key moments in their lives that saw them create an unbreakable bond with the Dior pieces they wore.

The exhibition focuses on the elegant women who have showcased Dior’s dresses, garments and accessories in style, from 1947 to the present day. Their personality, style and key moments from their lives are explored through a selection of dresses, photographs, letters, paintings and drawings.

The Christian Dior Museum pays homage to Princess Grace of Monaco, Lady Diana, Leonor Fini, Olivia de Havilland, Jackie Kennedy, Francine Weisweiller, Marilyn Monroe, Charlize Theron, Liz Taylor, Mitzah Bricard, Edmonde Charles-Roux, Natalie Portman, Jennifer Lawrence, Marion Cotillard and Rihanna.

Among the exhibition’s striking portraits, Lady Diana can be seen on a trip to Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1995, carrying the bag that would become the iconic Lady Dior. Similarly, Rihanna can be seen attending Dior’s 2016 spring/summer ready-to-wear show, held in Paris, France, in 2015.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a book, also entitled Women in Dior – Sublime Elegance of a Portrait, written by fashion journalist Laurence Benaïm and published by Rizzoli. The book takes a closer look at the famous figures who marked the history of the French fashion house, exploring their tastes, their memories and – of course – their Dior ensembles.

In Pictures: Many Facets of Iroshini Chua

Dr Iroshini Chua wears many hats as a mother of two, family physician, travel columnist, high society fixture, party planner, accomplished home chef, charity crusader, style influencer, among others. The multi-hyphenate is also well known for her good taste in accessories and her love of gemstones. She has designed jewelry as a hobby business in the past, and is planning to launch her own brand in the near future. We asked her to share a few secrets on how she balances style and comfort so effortlessly.

Hostess With The Mostest

Special thanks to The St. Regis Singapore for hosting the photo shoot at its lavishly appointed Presidential Suite, which features a master bedroom, living room, dining room, executive office, gym, and terrace. Displayed on the premises are prized artworks by masters including Marc Chagall, Mark Tobey, Le Pho, and Sam Francis. Hand-painted silk panels adorn the walls, while custom-made Czech crystal chandeliers cast a warm glow. Other highlights include a luxurious bedroom and a beautiful master bathroom with its own Jacuzzi and separate jet massage shower with marble steam chamber.

Special thanks to The St. Regis Singapore for hosting the photo shoot at its lavishly appointed Presidential Suite, which features a master bedroom, living room, dining room, executive office, gym, and terrace. Displayed on the premises are prized artworks by masters including Marc Chagall, Mark Tobey, Le Pho, and Sam Francis. Hand-painted silk panels adorn the walls, while custom-made Czech crystal chandeliers cast a warm glow. Other highlights include a luxurious bedroom and a beautiful master bathroom with its own Jacuzzi and separate jet massage shower with marble steam chamber.

Van Cleef & Arpels Magic Alhambra one-motif white gold and diamond long necklace, Perlée white gold hoop earrings, Cadenas white gold and diamond watch; Emporio Armani embroidered cotton-mix pleated dress.

Career Woman

Christian Dior La Mini D de Dior 19mm watch, Rose Dior Pré Catalan pink gold and amethyst necklace, earrings, and ring, polyamide-mix pleated dress.

Christian Dior La Mini D de Dior 19mm watch, Rose Dior Pré Catalan pink gold and amethyst necklace, earrings, and ring, polyamide-mix pleated dress.

“I like wearing timeless and feminine clothes and jewelry that can easily take me from the clinic to an evening engagement.”

Mummy Duty

The Presidential Suite is part of The St. Regis Singapore’s Suite Society programme, which also features the Manhattan, Metropolitan, Knickerbocker, Astoria, and King Cole Suites. Guests who book them are offered exclusive access to exceptional dining and lifestyle privileges.

The Presidential Suite is part of The St. Regis Singapore’s Suite Society program, which also features the Manhattan, Metropolitan, Knickerbocker, Astoria, and King Cole Suites. Guests who book them are offered exclusive access to exceptional dining and lifestyle privileges.

Audemars Piguet Ladies Royal Oak Self-winding 37mm diamond watch; Chanel pearl sautoir; Iroshini’s own pearl and diamond ring; Christian Dior printed cotton-knit top and viscose-mix skirt.

Jet-setter

Available across all St. Regis properties around the world, the St. Regis Aficionado programme provides guests with exceptional bespoke experiences, such as private access to the world’s premier lifestyle collections and auctions, tasting rare private vintages, and getting a custom-tailored garment made.

Available across all St. Regis properties around the world, the St. Regis Aficionado programme provides guests with exceptional bespoke experiences, such as private access to the world’s premier lifestyle collections and auctions, tasting rare private vintages, and getting a custom-tailored garment made.

Vacheron Constantin Traditionelle Small Model 33mm watch with diamonds; Iroshini’s own yellow sapphire ring, blue sapphire earrings; Ondademar silk kimono, cotton camisole, woven hat, heels.

“I love to discover new destinations, and I holiday at resorts about eight to 10 times a year. I don’t believe one should eschew style for comfort or vice-versa. This resort outfit is my perfect solution as it is comfortable for lounging by the pool as well as a chic ensemble for the restaurants. Matching it well is this Vacheron Constantin watch, which is so versatile and offers a pop of color.”

Lady Of Leisure

Chopard L’Heure du Diamant collection white gold necklace with 4.85 carats of diamonds, High Jewellery white gold ring with 13.6 carats of yellow diamonds and 1.28 carats of white diamonds, High Jewellery white gold and diamond ear studs; Diane von Furstenberg appliqué cotton-mix dress; Wedgwood Daisy Tea Story teacup and saucer set.

Chopard L’Heure du Diamant collection white gold necklace with 4.85 carats of diamonds, High Jewellery white gold ring with 13.6 carats of yellow diamonds and 1.28 carats of white diamonds, High Jewellery white gold and diamond ear studs; Diane von Furstenberg appliqué cotton-mix dress; Wedgwood Daisy Tea Story teacup and saucer set.

“I believe that diamonds can be beautifully paired with a busy print or loud colors to pull an entire look together without competing with them. This way, each can be admired in its own right.”

Belle Of The Ball

Home to one of the finest private art collections in Southeast Asia, The St. Regis Singapore offers exclusive access to museum-quality art. The collection showcases over 70 original works of art, including sculptures, paintings, and prints by internationally renowned artists. Hotel guests are invited to partake in The Art of Living tour around the hotel, conducted by the hotel butlers at 6pm daily.

Home to one of the finest private art collections in Southeast Asia, The St. Regis Singapore offers exclusive access to museum-quality art. The collection showcases over 70 original works of art, including sculptures, paintings, and prints by internationally renowned artists. Hotel guests are invited to partake in The Art of Living tour around the hotel, conducted by the hotel butlers at 6pm daily.

Piaget Extremely Piaget white gold ear cuff with 3.19 carats of diamonds and 12.76 carats of blue sapphires, Extremely Piaget white gold necklace with diamonds totalling 52.43 carats, a 20.06-carat cushion-cut sapphire, and a 7.35-carat pear-shaped blue sapphire, Limelight white gold secret watch with Polynesian mother-of-pearl and 506 multi-cut diamonds totaling 76.24 carats; Iroshini’s own Tex Saverio silk-mix laser-cut applique tiered gown; Jimmy Choo red suede clutch.

Party Princess

At The St. Regis Singapore, all guests have access to the signature St. Regis Butler Service, which includes food and beverage requests, unpacking and packing of luggage, garment pressing, and the e-butler option for access to the butler service, from within or outside the hotel, at any hour 
via e-mail.

At The St. Regis Singapore, all guests have access to the signature St. Regis Butler Service, which includes food and beverage requests, unpacking and packing of luggage, garment pressing, and the e-butler option for access to the butler service, from within or outside the hotel, at any hour 
via e-mail.

Cartier Panthère Captive de Cartier white gold watch with diamonds, emeralds, and onyx, Panthère de Cartier yellow gold earrings with tsavorites and diamonds, Panthère de Cartier yellow gold bracelets, one with tsavorites and onyx, the other with black lacquer, tsavorites, diamonds, and onyx; Iroshini’s own Tex Saverio polyester-mix laser-cut top; Marciano cotton-mix shorts; Ash gladiator heels

“My wardrobe contains edgy and architectural pieces for night outs. They allow me to have fun with fashion and be experimental. The iconic panther motif on the timepiece and jewels packs a punch and makes the entire look more impactful.”

Story Credits

Text by Yanni tan

Images by Wong Wei Liang

Styling by Vernon Sim

Styling Assistance by Christine Lim

Hair by Eileen Koh

Makeup by Amy Chow, using Chanel colors

Location The Presidential Suite at the St. Regis Singapore

This story first appeared in WOW Jewelry, Singapore.

Dior Granville Candy Colored Jewelry

From peridots, green beryls, aquamarines, tanzanites, tourmalines and rubellites come together in this 12-piece collection and draw inspiration from Christian Dior’s childhood home, Granville. Named after the home he spent his time in as a child, which is now a museum, the candy-colored gems that make up the collection are the brainchild of Victoire de Castellane.

The brand’s fine jewelry creative director explained that the pieces were created “as if putting stickers together spontaneously, without any preconceived constraints”. Although inspired by childhood joie de vivre, the pieces have been meticulously crafted with creativity and exceptional skill in Dior’s Parisian high-jewelry workshops.

A pink gold watch in the "D de Dior Granville" collection, with brilliant cut yellow sapphires on the bezel, a diamond studded crown, turquoise dial and pale pink patent leather bracelet.

A pink gold watch in the “D de Dior Granville” collection, with brilliant cut yellow sapphires on the bezel, a diamond studded crown, turquoise dial and pale pink patent leather bracelet.

Christian Dior’s Normandy childhood is channeled in rings, earrings and bracelets that pop with color. The collection is accompanied by a range of nine watches, crafted from white, yellow and rose gold, evoking the festive and colorful ambiance of the Granville carnival.

Flagship pieces in the “D de Dior Granville” collection include a pink gold watch with a bezel set with brilliant-cut yellow sapphires and a diamond-studded crown. This fresh bouquet of springtime color is topped with a turquoise dial and a pale pink patent leather bracelet.

Christian Dior Delivers for Haute Couture 2016

In our Twitter post on the Spring 2016 Haute Couture show for Christian Dior, we wondered if a collection can be called haute couture, or indeed couture, without a designer at the helm. In fact, not only is Raf Simons gone, as has been widely reported, but his number two, Pieter Muller, is also out. Well, the design team at the luxury icon answered our question emphatically with a collection that was both true to the house’s heritage and to powerful trends sweeping runways everywhere. In short, the creative team stitched up exceedingly beautiful clothes.

Presented Monday January 25 in Paris, that collection struck a poised balance between the elegant and the risqué, featuring the house’s signature lightness of touch and sensual approach to women’s fashion, in the words of the AFP report covering much-anticipated show.

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Staged at the Musée Rodin, the show opened with graceful monochrome ensembles featuring geometric necklines and cutout skirt details, with austere black overcoats flapping open to reveal diaphanous dresses festooned with ostrich feathers. Then came the miniskirts, featuring doodle-style black-and-white sketch motifs and floral panels. The hemlines grew longer, dropping gorgeously to below the knee in an asymmetrical fashion, and skirts teamed with nothing but an open blazer to give the look a raw edge.

The designers played with volume, nodding to the current trend for outsized coats with a camel jacket featuring structured sleeves, and a floral midi dress that flared out at the hips before tapering back in along the leg. A midi strapless dress with a stiff ruffled neckline was actually revealed to have full-length sleeves and cold shoulder blouses were given extra structure thanks to the addition of puffball volumes. Frothy hemlines peeked out from underneath sharp outwear for an added dash of fancifulness.

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Monochrome prints were livened up with bold flashes of color for a modern edge while semi-sheer fabrics gave the collection the dreamy, whimsical air the house does so well. A quick nod to the underwear-as-outerwear trend meant that the final tailored, structured looks did nothing to quash the collection’s magical and very Dior-like effect.

In the end, the clothes shown were unmistakably Dior but, as Vogue reported, perhaps not entirely couture. Still, we look forward to what Lucie Meier and Serge Ruffieux, credited with the collection, will deliver in the years to come in what will hopefully be long and fruitful careers.

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Cavalier Swagger Returns to Paris Catwalks

French fashion is back to its swashbuckling best and the designer leading the charge is a young mixed-race man determined to give post-attacks Paris a new swagger.

“I want to make all men feel like princes again,” Olivier Rousteing declared January 23 after his dashing, unashamedly masculine show for Balmain. Not since the days of the Charge of the Light Brigade has there been such an onrush of braid, breeches and boots.

Rousteing’s models were not the pallid sexless automatons of so many shows. Instead, they were dashing hussars and Cossack officers you half expected would pull cavalry swords from their gorgeous scarlet and leather cummerbunds as they thundered through a Parisian mansion.

Half of them looked like they had come straight from the ball the night before Waterloo in their silk and velvet breeches, with big brass-buttoned greatcoats thrown on their shoulders, and fur and tassels flying. Actually, Rousteing has delivered on this vision before, as seen below. Despite wanting the romanticism of associating the collection with some sort of defiance against terror, the cavalry has clearly been waiting in the wings for Balmain for some time.

HMBalmaination

“Paris is the City of Light and those lights should continue to shine,” the 30-year-old designer, a favorite of pop divas Beyonce and Rihanna, told AFP.

“I want to bring back the dream and beauty that is Paris… and make all men feel like princes again. I want to show the diversity and colors of France and to show that Paris has a past, a present and it will have a future,” he added.

Rousteing (pictured above and below), who was adopted by his white parents when he was a one-year-old, said his show was an ode to the racial and cultural diversity of the French capital.

A symphony orchestra, playing live to a hip-hop soundtrack, provided the musical tone.

“Mixing Kanye West and Rihanna with a symphony orchestra is my universe. I am French in a French fashion house with a couture tradition which also has a very international influence. That for me is Paris – it is that internationalism and the richness of the mixing of cultures.

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“This singular eagerness to embrace a diversity of cultures and ideas… enrages intolerant minds both here and abroad,” he said.

An Internet darling, with 2.1 million Instagram followers, Rousteing has become a reference for stars as diverse as Jane Fonda and Nicki Minaj, who even rapped on the venerable couture brand’s name as sales have soared.

Rousteing’s high-cheekboned good looks, social media savvy and friendships with stars such as West and his wife Kim Kardashian has led to him being called a “selfie-made man” – a joke he appears to delight in.

Earlier in the day there was a similar defiance against giving in to fear after the November massacres from Dior’s Kris Van Assche. Leading the charge for the Dior man was the millionaire skateboarder, as seen below. Old World cavalry officers were a no-show at Dior Homme.

Although much of his collection was in black, it was not the black of mourning, Assche insisted.

“The events mean that we have to be stronger to make people dream. The darkness is so omnipresent that as a designer who have to go further. You need more power and strength,” he told AFP.

“In fact I like the idea of darkness pushing creativity,” he said, echoing the sombre luxuriance of Dries Van Noten stand-out line, and fellow Belgian creator Walter Van Beirendonck, whose show was simply called “Woest”, which means furious in Flemish.

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Paris-based label Etudes – whose studio is near the Bataclan concert hall were 90 people died in November’s attacks – seemed almost to be on a war footing in their Saturday show, with a collection largely comprised of military-inspired and camouflage outfits, fighter pilot fatigues and parachute suits.

There was a similar ready-for-anything air in newcomers OAMC, whose nifty high-end functional streetwear is also created only a few blocks away and is replete with the spirit of Parisian resistance.

But if you were looking for a sign that “Paris will always be Paris”, look no further than the Hermes show on Saturday night. All the elements of ineffable casual French style were there, the discreet charm of the bourgeoisie personified.

Only that dried-blood red, a color that crops up across the collections like a wound, would lead you to believe that anything untoward had happened.

Dior and I documentary

3 Must-See Paris Haute Couture Week Shows

As usual, Paris plays host to the biggest celebration of high fashion on earth even as the big chill rules the streets. Paris Haute Couture Fashion Week officially kicks off today, January 24, and runs till January 28 with around 30 catwalk shows lined up on the official schedule. Certain shows will be of particular interest to the fashion world this year, including one show staged with no creative director and the first steps of a fledgling fashion house in the world of haute couture.

The fashion world will cast its gaze on Paris to spot upcoming trends for spring/summer 2016/2017, even though haute couture is notoriously difficult to read. We recommend simply sitting back to enjoy the shows and the sneak preview of the gowns due to grace red carpets throughout 2016.

However, all eyes will be on three fashion houses in particular at the 2016 Haute Couture Week: Christian Dior, Yiqing Yin and Guo Pei.

AFP PHOTO / FRANCOIS GUILLOT

AFP PHOTO / FRANCOIS GUILLOT

Christian Dior post-Raf Simons

The departure of Raf Simons as creative director at Dior in October sent shockwaves through the fashion world. Eyes will be fixed firmly on this haute couture show, which is taking place on January 25 with no creative director. The design team alone has been in charge of this collection, as it was for the autumn/winter 2016-2017 ready-to-wear collection. This isn’t a first for Dior, which saw itself in a similar situation after parting ways with John Galliano in 2011, but this preview will still no doubt be one of the most closely watched. Dior could even take the opportunity to make its much-awaited announcement of Raf Simons’ replacement.

© AFP PHOTO/ROSLAN RAHMAN

© AFP PHOTO/ROSLAN RAHMAN

Newcomer Guo Pei

Haute couture’s “Chambre syndicale” announced back in November that Chinese designer Guo Pei would be joining the Paris catwalk for the first time as a special guest this year. Guo Pei’s January 27 preview will be the closing show of this prestigious fashion week (only jewelry will be shown the final day, January 28), and it’s definitely one to watch. A new arrival will understandably pique the interest of the fashion world, but Guo Pei is also known for creating a huge buzz last year when Rihanna wore her enormous yellow coat-dress to the 2015 Met Ball. Pictures of the red-carpet outfit went viral around the world and on social networks within just a few hours. As a result, this spring/summer 2016 collection is even more keenly anticipated.

© AFP PHOTO / FRANCOIS GUILLOT

© AFP PHOTO / FRANCOIS GUILLOT

A new era for Yiqing Yin

The fashion house created by Chinese-born, Paris-raised and Paris-based designer Yiqing Yin was awarded “haute couture” status back in December. Although this isn’t the first time the label has presented its collections during Haute Couture Week, it was, until now, only doing so as a guest member. This marks a new era for the young designer, who recently quit her role as creative director of Léonard to concentrate on her own label. She was also named “Best Fashion Designer” at France’s “Globes de Cristal” awards ceremony in 2015. The front row of this show is sure to be a hot ticket.

Best Dressed at the Golden Globes 2016

Hollywood’s top stars were armored in glamour January 10 as they dazzled the Golden Globes red carpet with lots of attitude. Guess who rocked the necklace shown above? Anyway, we saw plenty to admire in terms of strapless wonders (Emmy Rossum in Armani with a Van Cleef & Arpels necklace, who has already won the Internet), amazing jewelry (Jennifer Lawrence, Jennifer Lopez and Julianne Moore are in a three-way tie for the win), unbeatable accessories that cannot be bought (mostly abs courtesy of Brie Larson and Kate Hudson, and Moore’s escort, Tom Ford) and properly impressive gowns (Lady Gaga, Jenna Dewan Tatum and Rooney Mara).

Here are our selections, with images via the AFP and Chopard (we are still waiting for a suitable image of Rossum), of the best-in-show for 2016. We shall see if any of these looks will make into the “Best-Of” lists for 2016…

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Kate Bosworth shone at this 73rd ceremony in a pink-and-silver sequinned number from Dolce & Gabbana.

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Emilia Clarke – The Game of Thrones actress channeled her fictional alter-ego with this vampy black floor-length gown and sheer-cape combo from Valentino.

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Lady Gaga – The American singer channeled retro chic on the red carpet at this year’s Golden Globes, with a long gown by Atelier Versace falling perfectly across her shoulders.

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Kate Hudson – Here is where a fitness regime really pays off. Hudson showed off her washboard abs in a glitzy nude ensemble by Michael Kors Collection. Aside from her abs, which is really what this look is about, the choker brings the whole thing together and is also from Michael Kors.

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Jennifer Lawrence – The scintillating Chopard necklace amplifies the J-Law’s Joy. At this year’s ceremony, she shone in a magnificent, red Christian Dior Couture gown with perfectly placed cutaways.

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Jennifer Lopez – The diva Latina wowed the red carpet in a flowing canary-yellow gown by Giambattista Valli Haute Couture. Apparently, that lovely necklace is by none other than Harry Winston. Oh yes and we love how the guy in the background seems so concerned about J-Lo’s train…

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Rooney Mara – The American actress took to the red carpet in a beaded, floor-length number from Alexander McQueen, in a nude hue almost matching her skin tone.

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Julianne Moore – With nothing to envy of her up-and-coming counterparts, Moore sparkled on the red carpet in this midnight-blue sequin-covered number by Tom Ford, with jewelry by Chopard. She was also accompanied by Ford himself, which gives her possibly the best arm candy at the show.

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Jada Pinkett Smith – With subtly revealed shoulders and a thigh-high split showing matching heels, Will Smith’s other half looked stunning in an emerald-green number by Atelier Versace.

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Jenna Dewan Tatum – Channing Tatum’s actress wife stunned the crowds at the 73rd Golden Globes in a Zuhair Murad Couture midnight-blue ball gown with delicate silver detail.

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Alicia Vikander – The Swedish actress looked ethereal in this delicate white dress from Louis Vuitton, proving that ruffles can be worn properly after all.

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Kate Winslet – The British actress, winner of “Best Supporting Actress” for her role in Steve Jobs, kept things simple but stylish in a long Ralph Lauren Collection gown with a subtle split.