Tag Archives: burberry

Perfect Pairing: Bridges Between Art, Fashion

Fashion and Art used to be separate worlds, obeying different codes and serving opposite purposes. This season though, the two universes got a step closer, through abounding references and unique collaborations between brands and artists.gucci-perfectpairing-2

From Gucci to Burberry, L’Officiel Singapore selected the most remarkable examples of this phenomenon in their October issue, dedicated to Pop Culture. Read the full “Perfect Pairing” story on lofficielsingapore.com.

Burberry Pays Tribute to Founder with Short Film

Burberry Pays Tribute to Founder with Short Film

This short film about Burberry founder Thomas Burberry is a three-minute affair that plays like a trailer for a full feature film. Alas starstruck fans of Burberry, there is no feature film behind this. The trailer is the whole movie, basically.

The British label launched its Holiday 2016 campaign this week, telling the story of founder, Thomas, and the key moments that built its international reputation. Domhnall Gleeson, Sienna Miller, Dominic West and Lily James star in the three-minute Christmas commercial, filmed in the style of a movie trailer.

Burberry is celebrating Holiday 2016, as well as the brand’s 160th anniversary, with a seasonal short film paying tribute to the luxury label’s founder, Thomas Burberry. The video looks back at some of the key events that helped make Burberry an internationally recognized brand.

Burberry Pays Tribute to Founder with Short Film

“This Christmas, as we celebrate our 160th anniversary, we wanted to tell the story of Thomas Burberry – pioneer, inventor, innovator, and the man behind the iconic trench coat – in our own words,’ said Christopher Bailey, Burberry Chief Creative and Chief Executive Officer. “The film we have made is a brief glimpse inspired by his full and extraordinary life, which threaded its way through the history of the twentieth century in all its tumultuous highs and lows.”

The label signed up a star cast and director for this Holiday 2016 campaign. “The Tale of Thomas Burberry” was written by Matt Charman and directed by filmmaker Asif Kapadia (“The Warrior,” “Amy”).

The film stars Domhnall Gleeson (“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows,” “The Revenant”) as Thomas Burberry and Sienna Miller (“American Sniper,” “Black Mass”) as Sara, a fictionalized version of his first love. Dominic West (“The Wire,” “Money Monster”) plays explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton and Lily James (“Downton Abbey”) is Betty Dawson, a character inspired by the life of pilot Betty Kirby-Green.

Key moments in the trailer include Thomas Burberry creating his water-resistant trench coat, which went on to become one of the brand’s signature pieces.

Burberry Private Event, Marina Bay Sands, Singapore

The Burberry September collection show was the first where both the new men’s and women’s collections were displayed for the first time. It was held late September as part of London Fashion Week, at Burberry’s new show venue “Makers house” in London’s Soho. The idea behind the collection was derived from the spirit of Nancy Lancaster’s interior and garden designs, as well as Virginia Woolf’s novel ‘Orlando’. The collection was a medley of noble and authentic fabrics, where denim and sweatshirting met cashmere and pyjama silks. It blurs the boundaries between masculine/feminine, casual/formal, and night/day.

The screening of the Burberry September collection show was one of the highlights of the brand’s private event at its Marina Bay Sands, Singapore, held on Friday 23 September. The 200 attendees of the event consisted of media, celebrities, and society ladies – including Rebecca Lim, Fiona Fussi, Hanli Hoefer, Paul Foster, Yvette King and Desmond Tan.

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After the screening, guests viewed the September collection up-close at the store in a powerful example of what the see now buy philosophy can accomplish. Since Burberry is one of the pioneers of the see-now-buy-now phenomenon, guests were able to purchase the collection fresh of the runway. Other activities included the monogramming of the Heritage Trench Coat, and a performance of five songs by Burberry acoustic British singer-songwriter Georgie (her first performance in Asia).

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The full September collection is now available to purchase at Burberry Marina Bay Sands, ION Orchard and Paragon stores and globally through Burberry.com, shipping to over 100 countries.

Burberry See Now Buy Now Collection Debuts

Fashion is driven by an insatiable desire for the new but is always teasing with fresh collections. Burberry says no more as its September collection goes on sale now, immediately after its showing at London Fashion Week. The British luxury label is hardly alone in making this move, with a number of major names agreeing with fashionistas that the months-long delay between seeing a new collection and having it in your hands is annoying.

Burberry put on sale its entire September collection as soon as it was previewed on the London catwalk, days after Tom Ford and Tommy Hilfiger made similar moves in New York. This is not to say that Burberry is following in anyone’s footsteps. This move has been in the works for some time and the brand is widely considered to be a trendsetter as far as adopting new ideas goes. Monday’s show, live streamed online around the world, was rich in historical references with heavy prints, military embroidery on jackets and ruffs inspired by Virginia Woolf’s epoch-spanning novel Orlando.

“I like traditional, beautiful, slow crafts, but we are living in a moment that changes everything – and speed is everything,” Burberry creative director and chief executive officer Christopher Bailey told reporters. “We’re changing the way that we all work and think and live.”

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The move to “buy now” means ditching the long-established tradition of showing one season ahead, which is pretty radical when you think about it. This change will have an impact right down the supply chain. It has pitted the more business-centric fashion weeks in London and New York against Milan and Paris, where luxury labels such as Dior and Chanel argue that instant gratification will disrupt the creative process. Truly, if ever a fashion season heralded a decisive break with the past, this is it.

But Bailey said the shift naturally follows the democratisation of fashion shows through live streaming, in which Burberry was a pioneer and which is now used in most of London’s on-schedule shows. “We will reflect after this show what has worked, what hasn’t worked. But I get excited about new things,” he said.

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Changing the business model 

By way of contrast, we already know that Karl Lagerfeld at Chanel is decidedly against instant gratification, a sentiment echoed by the business side of things too. Fashion mogul Francois-Henri Pinault, whose Kering group owns Gucci, Saint Laurent, Alexander McQueen and Balenciaga, has previously said the new model went against the “dream and desire” that drives the industry.

For Burberry, it coincided with the merging of the brand’s men and women’s lines, resulting in just two shows a year rather than four, which Bailey said had led to a “much calmer season”. Whatever the case may be there, it will certainly save Burberry money, which is important in the current tough times.

But selling off the catwalk is a challenge for smaller brands. They do not have their own shops and use fashion week as a showcase for buyers, who place orders that the designers fill over the coming months. Take for example Temperley London, a label known for its modern take on bohemian style using artisan techniques with hand-worked details.

This season it sold three items straight after its London show via social media platform Vero, but designer Alice Temperley said any more would be a struggle. “We couldn’t do the whole collection without changing our entire business model,” she told AFP.

With consumers becoming ever more demanding, such brands may have no choice but to speed up the delivery process, however. “Consumers now live in a very fluid present, and that is where the brands need to be,” said Magdalena Kondej, retail analyst at Euromonitor International.

“Fast fashion has an obvious advantage in terms of already efficient supply chains but it is luxury brands that will have to adjust on a bigger scale and shorten the period between runway buzz and retail availability.”

Nevertheless, this line of thinking presumes that speed is most important to customers, who obviously don’t care about supply chains and logistics. They do care about quality though and we hope the current moves in fashion towards greater currency won’t lead to creative and production compromises. Artisans can only stitch things together so fast, after all, and that is part of the charm. After all, we do not live in the age of Star Trek, where advanced technology produces anything you care to ask for, on-demand.

Burberry London Livestream 2016

Numerous brands are showcasing their collections at London Fashion Week and we have been invited to catch Burberry’s runway show as it happens later today. With nearly 100 looks set to walk the ramp, the show promises to be an entertaining display.

Visit L’Officiel Singapore to find out more about the show and how you can visit the venue in London until September 27.

Creative Renaissance Expected at Paris Fashion Week

Seasonal changes are transformative but Paris Fashion Week this September is expected to reveal major creative shifts at some of the biggest names in luxury fashion. With so many new creative directors in place at France’s biggest fashion houses, this season’s Paris Fashion Week is supposed to bring a breath of fresh air to the capital.

These changes at the creative helm, collectively, represents a transformative time for labels, and one gets the sense that if revival and renewal don’t make a strong showing in the spring/summer 2017 season, the fashion world will be disappointed. This is likely because many of the wider changes in the fashion business will not be evident in Paris.

Paris Fashion Week is unlikely to see many – if any – of the combined menswear and womenswear collections on the agenda in Milan, New York and London. The same goes for the “see now buy now” concept. While fashion houses such as Burberry, Tom Ford and Michael Kors are bringing their latest collections to stores straight after their runway shows (globally in some cases), French fashion is resisting this revolution. Most French fashion houses will continue to operate on the traditional industry schedule for the upcoming round of shows.

So, the weight of expectations if fully on the creative directorship changeovers at many big houses, putting the French capital firmly in the spotlight. Some of the incoming designers’ first collections for their new employers are eagerly awaited in the fashion world.

Dior, Lanvin, Saint Laurent

The upcoming Dior show will be a particular focus of attention, overseen for the first time by Maria Grazia Chiuri. A former co-creative director of Valentino, the Italian fashion designer is the first woman to take the reins of Dior’s haute couture, ready-to-wear and accessories collections. The new ready-to-wear line is expected to mark a fresh start for the label, with particular emphasis on accessories, a domain in which Maria Grazia Chiuri notably excels.

Since a traumatic parting of ways with its emblematic creative director, Alber Elbaz, almost a year ago, Lanvin is also set to enter a new era in September. The label’s Paris show, scheduled September 28, will allow Bouchra Jarrar, now heading womenswear collections, to showcase the full extent of her talent and to bring a feminine, modern touch to Lanvin’s style.

The fashion world will also have its eyes on Saint Laurent this season, again due to a recent change in creative director. The upcoming show from Anthony Vaccarello, who replaced Hedi Slimane, will be especially eagerly awaited since his predecessor’s style was so intrinsically linked with the spirit of the brand. What’s more, his arrival has brought a few changes to the Paris schedule. Not only has Saint Laurent chosen to move its show to the first day of Paris Fashion Week, September 27, but Anthony Vaccarello also announced that he was putting work for his own label on hold, with no show in store for the Paris event.

Sonia Rykiel in the spotlight

The Sonia Rykiel show is likely to be emotionally charged at this season’s Fashion Week. Scheduled October 3 – barely a month after the death of the brand’s eponymous founding designer – the show could take the form of a final homage, both in terms of its staging and the pieces in the new collection. The show could prove a fitting farewell for this French designer who revolutionized fashion, liberating women from stuffy bourgeois looks and introducing a hint of relaxed chic that characterizes French style today.

London Fashion Week Open for Business

London Fashion Week Open for Business

The world is still coming to grips with New York Fashion Week, which was even more packed with innovations than expected, but it is time to look ahead once more to London Fashion Week. The pace is blistering and technology is staying at least one medium ahead of everyone, it seems. By the time London steps into the spotlight, our collective notions about seasons and trends may have already been forever altered.

Against a backdrop of general uncertainty and anxiety, there’s also Brexit to contend with but the institution that is London Fashion Week (LFW) has declared itself firmly open for business. The notices have been going out to every news service that will transmit them, including ourselves. In an unrelated move, we also received notice that Brexit fallout continues, with David Cameron stepping down as MP. Given that Cameron is hardly an important figure in fashion circles, this news will likely not be a distraction…hopefully.

LFW will have a torrid time as it is, getting ready to welcome more than 5,000 guests from 58 countries and 83 major designers scheduled for 64th edition of the extravaganza.

Figures released in June show that the British fashion industry’s national worth has grown by 8% since 2013, now totaling £28 billion (about $37 billion), and LFW is capitalizing on the strength of the sector with an event that will focus on change and innovation (the same keywords, as we noted, so prominently on show right now in New York).

When it comes to those keywords, as it applies to London Fashion Week, all eyes will surely be on the UK house of Burberry as it shows its menswear and womenswear collections together for the first time, with the pieces available to buy directly afterwards.

The label, headed by Christopher Bailey, isn’t the only major player here to embrace this change. Reports have it that Fyodor Golan, House of Holland and Topshop Unique will also be showing see-now buy-now collections. Meanwhile, Aquascutum, Belstaff, Joseph and this year’s Woolmark Womenswear winner Teatum Jones will also put menswear and womenswear together on the catwalk.

In addition to the official catwalk schedule, the SS17 edition of LFW will also feature more than 150 labels presenting in the Designer Showrooms at Brewer Street Car Park. International brands MM6 and Versus return to the city, while Huishan Zhang, Molly Goddard and the aforementioned Teatum Jones will all be showing on catwalks for the first time. This year, LFW intends to become more UKFW, with 20 Ocean Outdoor screens across Birmingham, Glasgow, Leeds, Liverpool, London, Manchester and Newcastle broadcasting LFW content. Given the way this content will be infiltrating people’s mobile phones, this move seems largely anachronistic, reflecting perhaps our earlier point about technology staying one step ahead of the trends themselves…

LFW runs September 16-20. For more information see www.londonfashionweek.co.uk

My Burberry Black

My Burberry Black Campaign Stars Lily James

The British fashion house Burberry is bringing its iconic black Heritage Trench to a sleek bottle with the new fragrance called My Burberry Black. Capturing not only elements of the trench but also the aroma of a London garden in the rain, the fragrance stars in its own campaign alongside British actress Lily James. Shot by none other than Mario Testino, the campaign is sensual and mysterious like the fragrance.

To find out more about the My Burberry Black fragrance and to watch the full campaign, visit L’Officiel Singapore.

Burberry see now buy now campaign visual

Burberry Teases First ‘See Now, Buy Now’ Collection

The image you are looking at teases Burberry’s first “see now, buy now” collection. As part of its new “see now, buy now” strategy, the British fashion label has previewed a first collection due to go on sale directly after its upcoming catwalk show, September 19. The brand also announced a collaboration with The New Craftsmen to honor to the various skilled craftspeople who work for the label.

Having been announced in February, this new instant gratification approach to the design, creation, promotion and sale of Burberry collections is starting to take shape with a first advertising campaign. This previews the first “see now, buy now” collection, set to be presented September 19 at London Fashion Week before going on sale to the public immediately afterwards. And, for the first time, the collection will mix womenswear and menswear.

For Burberry creative director, Christopher Bailey, the changes currently underway at the label will help the brand establish closer links between the world created through its fashion shows and the moment consumers discover collections for themselves in stores. Unspoken in all of this is the role the Internet plays, carrying as it will the livestreams and such of the show.

Honoring craftsmanship

The British brand’s new collection is directly inspired by Virginia Woolf’s 1928 novel Orlando. This can be seen through contrasting masculine and feminine pieces from different periods in history.

Burberry has also chosen to honor the brand’s many skilled craftspeople with a campaign from Mario Testino. The three new faces of the brand – Jean Campbell, Cavan McCarthy and Alex Dragulele – star alongside Piero Calosi, the pattern-maker who worked on Burberry’s latest bag, The Bridle. Burberry will gradually unveil images of several talented artisans working behind the scenes at the brand’s English, Scottish and Italian production facilities.

A series of events in London

After the upcoming catwalk show, September 19, Burberry will also launch a partnership with The New Craftsmen, which promotes the work of British craftspeople. The collaboration will see events and activities at Makers House, Burberry’s new venue in the British capital.

The venue will be open to the public from September 21 to 27 for an exhibition of work by British craftspeople inspired by the label’s latest collection and its theme.

British department store Harrods

Harrods, Burberry Plan Exclusive Holiday Capsule

It is never too early to think about Christmas, especially if you have something special up your sleeve, as department store Harrods and fashion label Burberry demonstrated. The British brands have joined hands to launch a set of holiday initiatives and an exclusive capsule collection.

The activities, branded under the banner “A Very British Fairy Tale,” are due to kick off in November and will include a holiday-themed winter window installment at the Harrods Brompton store, which follows two children on an imaginative journey through the English countryside.

Additionally, the store will also stock an exclusive capsule collection by Burberry comprising ready-to-wear, accessories and gifts. The brand will also mount craftsmanship and personalization stations at the store, which will allow shoppers to have their Burberry purchases monogrammed by an artisan.

The tie-up is part of a wider major new strategic plan by Burberry, which aims to further fine-tune its merchandise offer and strengthen existing relationships with wholesale partners WWD reported.

Marco Gobbetti Appointed New Burberry CEO

The term musical chairs has been used so many times to describe the ever-increasing list of appointments in fashion, it is no longer amusing (and this term is now banned on our site with relation to fashion world appointments). Forget the designers, even CEOs are walking in and out of the revolving doors of high fashion faster than our nimble fingers can keep up. The latest to join the list of companies trying to find bottom line answers in the age of digital disruption is Burberry.

Once a digital success story under the guidance of current Chief Executive and Chief Creative Officer, Christopher Bailey, the company is ready for all-new moves to address the current challenges, which are both marketing and retail related. The brand announced its appointment of Marco Gobbetti to replace Bailey in his role as Chief Executive as soon as next year.

The changes in top tier management do not mean that Bailey is out of a job. Instead, he will take on the newly minted role of president of Burberry. In the two years that Bailey has led the company, Burberry shares have retreated, causing many investors to express their discontent. It was clear that the dual role he held in the company, following Angela Ahrendts departure from the company, has caused many to conclude that he had been overstretched while his talent was under-utilized. With a decline in demand for luxury goods worldwide, Bailey even took a 75% pay cut to help ease the drop in sales. We commend Bailey for his singular dedication to the brand and there can be no doubting his commitment.

Marco Gobbetti is currently the chairman and CEO of luxury label Céline and has an impressive resume. Prior to his role at Céline, Gobbetti was the CEO for both Moschino and Givenchy. The surprise housekeeping move saw Burberry’s shares rise 7.9% — a sign that investors welcome the new appointment. This is not the only shift at Burberry though. The brand also announced the appointment of Julie Brown as the new chief operating and financial officer. While Carol Fairweather currently holds this role, she is set to leave Burberry by 2017.

18 Best Pre-Fall Womenswear Trends 2016

From androgynous dress suits in floral prints to saccharine-sweet pastels and kitsch sensuality, the trends for Pre-Fall 2016 are pretty diverse, so there’s something for everyone. Here, our friends at L’Officiel Singapore have done the research for you to bring you 18 looks you should sport for the transitional season.

DRESSY SUIT

18 PF16 Trends_Givenchy

Givenchy by Ricardo Tisci

When it comes to suiting now, bolder is better. Give your classic navy and black suits a rest and look to versions in daring prints and opulent fabrics – think Bottega Veneta’s mismatched tailoring or Givenchy’s flower-embellished stunner punked up with studded boots.

STANDARD (RE)ISSUE

Alexander Wang

Alexander Wang

Military gets a cool downtown vibe with Alexander Wang’s introduction of grunge elements – beanies, 
chains and opaque tights – and unexpectedly ladylike accents in the form of velvet heels.

DOUBLE COATED

Dior

Dior

A clever take on layering by the design team at Dior, with a gently curved olive coat shrugged over another coat in rich brown fur. A lace-trimmed slip and sparkly flats lends ease and lightness to the look.

SHEAR THING

Burberry

Burberry

Shearling continues to be a giant trend for Pre-Fall, turning up as cool outerwear at brands as diverse as Coach, Paco Rabanne and Stella McCartney. Christopher Bailey showed an oversized one at Burberry, which he paired with sleek flares and a boyish rucksack.

FUN FURS

Fendi

Fendi

Shearling’s more luxurious cousin is also having its moment in the sun, but these furs are not your grandmother’s dowdy ones. Pre-Fall’s best shaggy pieces come in fabulous hues and patterns like those on Marni’s graphic check fur stole, Valentino’s ombre fur robe and Fendi’s floral explosion.

CANDY CRUSH

Michael Kors Collection

Michael Kors Collection

Considering the fact that most Pre-Fall collections hit shop floors at the height of summer, it makes sense to drench them in sweet, uplifting shades. Giorgio Armani showed tiered dresses in washed-out blues, Sportmax proposed pale lemon for our outerwear, while Michael Kors had us thinking pink.

MASCULINE FEMININE

Versace

Versace

Boy-meets-girl is a trope fashion loves to reinterpret. This season’s offerings include Jason Wu’s jackets that were sculpted for a feminine silhouette, butterfly and lipstick prints on an Alexander McQueen pantsuit, and Prince-of-Wales tailoring at Versace shot through with baby blue and worn with a tiny skirt.

SHINE ON

Emilio Pucci

Emilio Pucci

Who says that sequins should only come out when the sun goes down? When styled with the right pieces, metallics make a wonderful daytime statement too. Case in point: Phillip Lim’s gold wide pants, worn with a silk shirt, and Emilio Pucci’s sequined shirt, paired with a breezy skirt and a sandal-sock combo.

PRETTY PLEATS

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Gucci

The pleated midi skirt is fashion’s favourite skirt shape of the moment and no one does it better than Alessandro Michele. This season he rendered it in high-impact silver worn with an equally shiny pink bomber. Elsewhere, Michael Kors, Giorgio Armani and Max Mara also offered beautiful options of the pleated midi.

MODERN ETHNIC

Alexander McQueen

Alexander McQueen

The current-season way to pull off ethnic influences can be seen in the collections of Alexander McQueen and Altuzarra. The key is to go for a sharper, more fitted silhouette; the end look needs to come off sleek and polished instead of billowy and bohemian.

POWER TULLE

Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney

Where Miuccia Prada goes, others are sure to follow. After last season’s enchanting tulle layers at Miu Miu, the gauzy fabric is shaping up to be a key layering element. Molly Goddard has built a name with her joyful tulle creations, while Stella McCartney presented a womanly version worn over trousers and a bustier.

TIE DYE TWIST

Valentino

Valentino

Designers are reinventing tie-dye with a luxe spin, moving it farther away from hippie-dippy and muddy music-fest connotations. Our favourite version is from Valentino, where the saturation is amped way up and cut into a modern anorak, juxtaposed with a smart shirt and thigh-highs.

SWEET ’60s

Bally

Bally

The youthful charm of the ’60s look has always endured – who can resist the appeal of a little skirt, a fitted jumper and a flattering peacoat? The best looks aren’t faithful reproductions, though; we love Pablo Coppola’s take at Bally where the coat is cut ultra-sharp in bright red and the skirt comes in glossy leather.

’70s REDUX

Saint Laurent

Saint Laurent

The ’70s is another decade that fashion keeps returning to, but no one makes a more convincing case than Hedi Slimane. At Saint Laurent, he conjured up the bohemian glamour of Loulou de la Falaise with his swishing culottes and midi skirts, all topped with silken blouses and showstopping cloaks and capes.

NAUGHTY & NICE

Chanel

Chanel

Fashion loves a good clash of contrasting ideas and this season, designers are riffing on the themes of naughty and nice. Bally has a sharply tailored trench in glossy, fetishistic patent; Alexander Wang put fishnet tights under prim skirts and Karl Lagerfeld invoked Italian screen sirens wearing leather and lace with tweeds and pearls.

SPORTS COUTURE

Paco Rabanne

Paco Rabanne

Athleticism in fashion is here to stay but the most talented, innovative designers are constantly finding new ways to elevate and marry it with high fashion. J.W. Anderson, for example, created bold new things from the idea of nylon and tracksuits, while Julien Dossena at Paco Rabanne cleverly mixed zippers and mesh with lush materials for an effortless but luxurious take.

PUFF PIECE

Louis Vuitton

Louis Vuitton

The grandly exaggerated Edwardian shoulder continues to get more play for Pre-Fall. It showed up with retro inflections at Gucci, while at 3.1 Phillip Lim and J.W. Anderson, it was deconstructed and updated for today’s cool girls. But the most interesting mash-up was at Louis Vuitton where Nicolas Ghesquière paired sculpted shoulders with motorcross leggings and edgy, chunky boots.

DENIM DREAMS

Valentino

Valentino

This wardrobe staple has been given a fancy upgrade for Pre-Fall. At Carven, it was mixed with shearling and shown as a total-look statement. Julie de Libran also showed denim-on-denim at Sonia Rykiel but her looks were embroidered while Massimo Giorgetti’s Pucci pieces were printed with feathers. The most whimsical were Valentino’s versions, which bore elaborate scenes and dreamscapes.

 

 

Bowers & Wilkins Teams With Burberry For T7 Gold

As one of the most portable and compact speakers out there, the Bowers & Wilkins T7 is the perfect fit for any audiophile who’s constantly on-the-go. For now, the brand is aiming to appeal to a more affluent customer range with a limited edition T7 Gold. Just in time for Father’s Day, the Limited edition release comes ahead of its global launch in September. Just for this special release, the T7 Gold comes in a limited edition finely designed leather travel case by the luxury brand Burberry.SS16_MAY_ACC_RGB_CROPPED_07

The partnership brings out the best of both parties, each with a rich heritage in their respective fields of luxury design and digital technology. The gold and black honeycomb exterior of the T7 matches well with the hand-finished leather case – especially the gold-finished Burberry logo. The case itself is available in two finishes: black embossed bridle leather and tan suede, and will be limited to 200 pieces.2016_ACOUSTIC_BOWERS_WILKINS_RGB_CROPPED_01

For an added special treat, 4 live EPs have been recorded by Burberry Acoustic musicians George Cosby, Fenne Lily, Rosie Carney, and Ten Tonnes. They will be available for purchase and download on Society of Sound. This is well in line with Burberry’s history of working with new and iconic artists as a part of runway shows – including names like Benjamin Clementine and Elton John.

As a perfect marriage of craft and audio technology, the limited edition T7 Gold will retail at £595 at selected Burberry stores.

To find our more about the T7 Gold, click here.

 

Father’s Day Gift Guide 2016

In case you’ve missed the memo, Father’s day is only 11 days away. If this is news to you, then don’t panic because you still have time (not much but it will do). For those fretting about what to get dear old Dad, we are here to help. Each year, children around the world spend time, effort and money putting together the perfect gift for the woman who spent long sleepless nights looking after you. We often overlook the man who spent sleepless nights wondering how in the world raising a child costs so much.

It is only fair then, that we put as much thought and effort to coming up with gifts for the man who is your bank, knight in shining armor and partner in crime. The great thing about getting something for Dad is that you can narrow the list down fairly quickly. First up, we have something that we think every father wishes he could have had a glass or two of when paying for your little (it really wasn’t that much!) shopping sprees.

AlcoholMacallan-edition-no-1-featured

There is nothing better to complete your day, than a glass of whisky. Our favorite go to whisky of course is none other than the Macallan Edition No. 1. We’ve given you a glimpse into just how good it is, and it is our expert (by that we mean that we drink it often enough to call ourselves experts) opinion that this is the one to truly warm your father’s heart this year. With orange and dried fruit, the Edition No.1 is a special blend that leaves you wanting more. Just don’t drink it all before dad has had a glass, or 10.

Grooming2016_MR_BURBERRY_FATHERS_DAY_RGB_CROPPED_02

Don’t you just love it when someone smells as good as they look? This year, why not get dad a fragrance that will leave him feeling like a million bucks, with a little help from Burberry. With the brand’s latest fragrance, Mr Burberry, you can gift him a sophisticated scent that mixes classic and unexpected ingredients. The woody fragrance has hints of grapefruit and smokey guaiac wood for a touch of seduction. For father’s day, the brand even brings you a monogramming service for that personalized touch.

Writing Instruments

Montblanc Heritage Collection Rouge & Noir Writing Instruments

Montblanc Heritage Collection Rouge & Noir Writing Instruments

You can never go wrong with a luxury pen and what better than a Montblanc writing instrument. Our pick would be the writing instruments from the brand’s Montblanc Heritage Collection Rouge & Noir, Special Edition that was created to celebrate the brand’s 110th anniversary. The pen features a serpent on its cap; an emblem that has been linked to the brand since it first began. The instruments are available in coral and black.

FashionDior-Homme-store-Opening-article-3

You could treat dad to a well-tailored suit for Father’s day, especially since it should be a staple in any man’s wardrobe. Head down to Dior Homme at ION Orchard, for an expertly crafted suit, that is sure to please the main man the moment he puts it on. If a suit isn’t something he favors, then you’re in luck. The spanking new store also carries one of Dior’s latest collections for men. This could be just the shopping spree that makes up for you using him as a flesh-and-blood ATM.

BagsTods-envelope-bag-brown-leather

Fresh from the latest Tod’s fall/winter collection, the Envelope bag is our accessory of choice. Sleek and simple, it is perfect for the modern man on the go. While the bag is available in black, we think this shade of brown will lend a youthful touch to an outfit. If you think he will love the bag as much as we do but it could be too bulky for an avid traveler, we have good news for you. The bag also comes in soft suede, so it can be stowed away in a luggage bag during travel with no trouble.

WatchesDRIVE_DE_-CARTIER_WATCH FACE

You may not be able to buy him a car — we have to be realistic and also, watch that carbon footprint people — but you can get him something inspired by automobiles. In walks the Drive de Cartier 1904-PS MC, with its cushion shaped case and exterior that takes its inspiration from cars. We have covered the timepiece in a previous article so we won’t bore you with the details but the guilloche dial and Roman numerals combined with the in-house Cartier movement make this a wonderful gift for a motor head.

Burberry Ads Star Edie Campbell, Callum Turner

Burberry released the first new images for their autumn collection 2016 starring Edie Campbell and Callum Turner. It is the second time the pair have fronted the British brand together. The campaign, shot by Mario Testino, casts the spotlight on the Patchwork handbag, of which no two are alike.

Each bag is named after a British city, town, or street. Also collaborating on the campaign is British illustrator Luke Edward Hall, tapped to create complementary sketches. You can see two examples of what he’s done, above and below.

Also new from Burberry, as soon as the campaign hits in June, customers will be able to buy what they see online, print and on the catwalk without having to wait for the traditional gap between showing and selling, notes WWD.

For more on this story, especially on Hall’s role, check out what our friends at L’Officiel Malaysia have posted on it.

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Luxury Brands Struggle to Draw Net Generation

Seducing hyper-connected “Millennials” poses an increasing challenge for luxury brands, which find their markets slowing as young, skeptical consumers force them to rethink strategies.

Goldman Sachs estimates that 92 million Americans are in the Millennial generation – born between the early 1980s and the 2000s – surpassing the famed cohort of postwar Baby Boomers who are now approaching a geriatric phase.

The huge pool of Millennial consumers grew up with the Internet, smartphones and the sharing economy in which owning things like cars is seen as almost unhip, although cars of all sorts are experiencing a boom at the moment.

Regardless, studies show Millennials have different expectations than their elders, who were relatively better paid and less indebted at the same point in life.

Deloitte analyst Nick Pope spoke this week at an FT Business of Luxury Summit of “a structural worry” as to whether there would be the “same level of spending in product ownership and luxury as there was in their parents’ generation.”

A Deloitte study targeted Millennials as an opportunity for luxury brands, but warned that they require “a high level of investment” and are more “mercurial” consumers whose brand loyalty can quickly shift.

“Their engagement with digital technology has exposed them to more sources of information, a greater range of influences, and smaller brands,” the study said of Millennials. “To attract, excite and engage Millennials will require a high level of brand investment.”

Luxury-sector sales, excluding the effects of currency changes, were up only one percent last year, and similarly tepid growth is expected this year, according to global management consulting firm Bain & Company.

US jeweler Tiffany recently announced a disappointing financial forecast, and the maker of the well-known British Burberry trench coat has embarked on a money-saving plan.

Digital Panacea?

“The people in the luxury space, they got very spoiled, because there was a market of people who consistently spent,” Sarah Quinlan of MasterCard Advisors told AFP on the sidelines of the FT luxury summit in San Francisco. “That market is no longer there.”

Oligarchs with lavish spending habits in Russia and China have seen growth slowing in their countries. It is unclear that Millennials, with their fickle and prudent spending styles, will take up the slack.

But Burberry has taken aim at those Millennials with a digital strategy cited as an example for the industry.

And LVMH, the France-based multinational luxury goods colossus, reached into the Silicon Valley talent pool last year and recruited Apple executive Ian Rogers.

Luxury brands including Burberry, Louis Vuitton and Tiffany have taken to relying heavily on social networks such as Snapchat that are popular with young people. Having a presence online and in social media has become a necessity for brands.

It promises to become even more important as people use smartphones while making buying decisions on the move. Internet titans are pitching instant shopping opportunities based on time, location, interests and more.

Still, brands such as Tiffany face a problem: some young people see them as “old-world luxury” items that don’t jibe with their Internet Age values and lifestyles, according to Neil Saunders of Conlumino retail research company.

Being on social networks has become a “must” in the marketing equation, but it is not enough, contended Quinlan.

“The bottom line is having something relevant that fits into their lifestyle,” Quinlan said of luxury brands that court Millennials. “I don’t think they’ve done enough to curate their brands.”

The fading allure of luxury items among Millennials is “not necessarily an income problem,” she contended.

Data collected by Mastercard describes consumers who choose to enhance their lives with spending on trips, dinners, outings and other experiences instead of on “stuff.”

“They might buy one piece; if it’s very special, it’s very valuable, has a memory of a trip somewhere,” Quinlan said.

Yet, Pope saw the luxury goods market as “absolutely sound,” so long as brands recognize the shifts under way and offer “value enhancing” products.

Thus, companies could transform their shops into places where people can socialize and linger as they might in a coffee shop, or connect with increasingly popular historical, ethical or sustainability trends.

Buckle Up With Burberry Belt Bag

After The Rucksack, Burberry continues its ‘Functionregalia’ fever for the season with the Belt Bag, a handy series of crossbodies that are inspired by the House’s Heritage Archives.

Available in two versions, the square shaped version is inspired by military styles from the 1920s to 1950s, while the oblong shaped one, by a small officer’s bag. The brand stays true to its English roots with rich, classic colors such as forest green, tan and burgundy, all of which are the perfect backdrop for the glistening gold metal buckle and leather belt detail.

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The Belt Bags will be available at these Burberry outlets in Singapore: ION Orchard, Marina Bay Sands and Paragon.

Find out more about the series at L’OfficielSingapore.com.

Burberry Launches The Rucksack

There’s no excuse for those shoulder aches and slouchy backs now that Burberry has released The Rucksack. Launched as part of their ‘Functionregalia’ collection for Spring/Summer 2016, the backpack’s regimental detailing is easily recognizable from Burberry’s military archive from the early 20th century. Available in three different sizes, the bag also comes in a palette of eight colors that would match just about your whole wardrobe (yes, including that flirty frock).

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Burberry didn’t neglect function for form either. This bag is water-repellent thanks to the durable lightweight nylon it is crafted from, while its soft silhouette and multi-zip pockets means that you can put just about all your essentials in without the bag bursting at the seams.

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Thanks to Burberry’s exclusive monogramming service, you can now personalize your Medium or Large Rucksack with up to three embroidered gold letters for a bag that’s like no other.

Find out more about The Rucksack at L’Officiel.com.

Guide: Suit Up for Age of Disruption

In the season finale of Billions, hedge-fund king Bobby “Axe” Axelrod had to pound the streets to win back former clients, failing miserably. It wasn’t until he ditched the designer suit and tie in favor of his regular business attire — hoodie, t-shirt and jeans — that he regained his mojo and started speechifying for the win. Dressed down (in high casual), he looked in control and ready to lead, and not just another guy in a suit begging for money. Quite the turn-on-head on Mark Twain’s “Clothes make the man.” To put it another way, expensive suits no longer denote business success.

The intention of a well-dressed workplace is to foster an image of professional success, and for the longest time the business suit embodied that confidence. Axe even said before his attire change (as if to convince himself): “Do you know why we wear ties? To signify seriousness of purpose. Ours is not to question why, but to do.” But clothing as a symbol of (self-)expression has evolved with the times. Office attire no longer distinguish management from workers. Silicon Valley’s “tribal uniforms” displaced the monotonous conformity of the workplace to create a more heterogeneous look. Virgin Group founder Sir Richard Branson notes that Twain was addressing the 19th century when dressing proper was important, whereas in many business setting today a clean pair of jeans, wrinkle-free shirt and pair of sneakers fit right in. So how did the business power suit lose its, well, power?

UNIFORM POWER

Actor Leonardo DiCaprio seen on the set of new film 'The Wolf of Wall Street' in New York City

The history of office wear in the 20th century goes something like this: Suits, suits, suits, suits, khakis. Indeed, the formal suit and tie has been quite the tyrant in its time, keeping a death grip on corporate business for decades by having generations of junior executives sedulously following the dress code of their bosses. The sartorially-inclined might argue that not all suits are made equal, but they’re just being pedantic; a suit is a suit, no matter the peak of its lapel or the fit of its cut.

While the suit’s provenance is likely too far-flung and complex to trace back, the modern look is said to have come directly from Europe at the turn of the century, where business titans donned custom-made frock coats complete with vest, pocket watch, striped trousers and top hat. The working class soon seized upon the fashion for work wear, but not before lobbing off the silly tails and shaping the garment into a more leisurely lounge suit. Mercantile tailors then made the suits slightly different every year (because we all know that’s the best way to get people to buy more clothes), leading to the proliferation of styles through the decades.

The indomitable suit survived the Depression and war, though cloth austerity led to the demise of the double-breasted. It gained personality with loud patterns when European designers insinuated themselves into business fashion, got cut from brave new synthetic fabrics, and paired up with ties that screamed color and size (with knots the size of babies’ fists). Then came Wall Street, the era of conspicuous consumption and flaunting power, where it lined the executive wardrobes of American gigolos and psychos. It became a corporate douchebag with suspenders, and made Armani a boardroom staple. It shrunk and billowed, all the while keeping the same basic shape for the last 100 years — a testament to the strength of its design. Such was the enduring value of the suit, and its monopoly on office dress codes seemed unshakeable.

CHANGING CODES

Alessio Jacona  Flickr 3

Then something radical happened in the 1990s. Blame it on the rise of the tech geeks, preceded by a little creative marketing by The Gap and Levi’s (via Dockers), but suddenly the suit has succumbed to khakis and jeans as the standard corporate livery.

It all started with an innocuous trend called Casual Friday. What human resources thought would be a fun (and free) employee perk turned out to be the seed that eventually inspires office drones to cast off the yoke of their slave-suits. This newfound sartorial freedom left workers slightly stranded at the beginning — many were at a loss without the safety of suits — but with the help of opportunistic brands like Dockers, the new business casual paradigm was established and the (somewhat oxymoronic) relaxed-yet-proper appearance of khaki slacks became de rigueur.

The advent of the Information Age soon gave the traditional business suit its quietus. Technopreneurs liked nothing better than to rant against it (“If you don’t have anything to say, wear a suit,” Bing Gordon, co-founder of Electronic Arts, once told Fortune magazine), while Silicon Valley titans like Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg and Sergey Brin ostensibly rejected the garment as anti-tech, uncreative and living in the past — in other words, dull. And when you run the world like these guys do, you can wear whatever the hell you want to the office, even hoodies and jeans.

This shift in dress code wasn’t just a matter of comfort or convenience, but signified a deeper change in the way people conceptualized professional success. The intense technological revolution has freed people from the confines of the workplace, leading the new generation of business graduates to believe (and decide) that working in a garage, in jeans, with the potential to make millions via a new startup, is more interesting than working in a glass and steel office at the bottom of a rigid corporate ladder. Suits were neither new nor modern, and companies that required them were thought of likewise; to put on a suit was to trail the bandwagon of self-made billionaires pushing into the future.

NEW HYBRID

Gucci

Gucci

In the new millennium, the confidence to dress informally and to disrupt traditional business codes only grew. Zuckerberg famously turned up to his Facebook IPO roadshow in his standard, nondescript uniform, causing consternation among Wall Street veterans. But what corporate conservatives don’t seem to understand is that the “CEO Casual” look is not about age (the lack thereof) or disrespect, rather it’s about presenting a modern, independent, innovative message. Moreover, dressing down only showcases how much power he commands; just because investors disagreed with his fashion choice, doesn’t mean they’re going to stop fighting for a piece of his company (in fact, Zuckerberg’s going to stick to his casuals, and investors are going to like it).

Burberry

Burberry

But as waves of hoodie-wearing millennials flooded companies, it’s hard to tell who’s truly innovative and who’s merely posing. And once everyone in the workplace is wearing t-shirts, sartorial individuality is poised to stand out. Hipster-dandies rose to revive the suit, but with maverick cuts to demonstrate that they’ve got the stuff to pull it off (case in point: The abominable shrunken suit — which originated from Thom Browne — worn with exposed ankles). There’s also a hybridisation of dress codes of sorts, either in the ensemble (suits worn with sneakers) or in the garments themselves (drawstring suit trousers, or technical-fabric suits like Z Zegna’s Techmerino).

Dior Homme

Dior Homme

The new emphasis on originality and freedom meant that anything goes in the office, really, insofar as it is polished and presentable. At the end of the day, the trend towards informality doesn’t actually get away from the traditional business emphasis on appearance and presentation. It simply replaces one standard with another that is, in its own way, just as preoccupied with appearance. At the very least, men are finally able to say that they wear suits when and how they want to.

 

 

This article was originally published in Men’s Folio Magazine

6 Runway Accessory Trends Maximizing Impact

The fashion runways churn out an impressive number of style stories with their trends and designs. Today we take a closer look at the accessories that don’t need to try too hard to catch your attention — simply because you can’t miss them. Bigger is always better it seems with the looks we’ve seen on the catwalk and we can’t wait to share some of our favorites, which are also the favorites of L’Officiel Singapore, who put together this piece.

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Statement necklaces and arm parties have seen their day. With so many designers cutting away garments to reveal necks and shoulders, it only makes sense to draw more attention to these areas via a pair of huge, sweeping shoulder-dusters.Make them the focal accessory by going for interesting details and colour combinations, lots of sparkle, or an arresting sculptural shape.

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Fashion’s fallen head over heels for this punk-tinged hardware, but given it a decidedly feminine touch. Alexander Wang used gold chains to embellish the dainty mesh bags in his romantic all-white Balenciaga collection. Miuccia Prada used them on retro, ladylike pieces in her rich, tactile collection, while Armani and Sarah Burton at Alexander McQueen draped them on the body to offset light, delicate clothes.

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Plastic truly is fantastic. Designers as varied as Christopher Kane, Simone Rocha, Karl Lagerfeld at Chanel and John Galliano at Maison Margiela all offered versions of the transparent stuff plastered on bags, heels, sandals and hats. The most directional pieces, though, came from Jonathan Anderson who used it on garments at his eponymous label and on plastic Puzzle bags, pouches, jewelry and even trousers at Loewe.

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If you’re looking to indulge your inner princess fantasies, now is the time to do it. The girls at No 21 wore bands of sparkling stones atop their dreamy white looks. The Rodarte sisters wove medieval-looking gold leaves into their models’ hair, while Dolce and Gabbana crowned their glamorous Italian girls with fruits, crystals and flowers. Not everything was so princess-like though; both Miuccia Prada and Hedi Slimane showed actual tiaras at Miu Miu and Saint Laurent, respectively, but their girls and the clothes had an alluringly rebellious vibe.

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Sandals are a fail-proof summer staple but they’ve now been given a fun fashion twist via luxe materials, bright punchy prints and, most importantly, an elevated standing thanks to a sturdy flatform or a low chunky block heel. We love Fendi’s graphic leather slides, Ferragamo’s strappy ones with pop-coloured soles and those printed Chanel sandals that light up like an airport runway.

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For Spring/Summer ’16, designers have chosen to make their biggest statements in white. The effect is clean and chic, but far from minimal. At Balenciaga, Alexander Wang sent out rucksacks, totes and clutches in beautifully delicate silk satin, lace and woven leathers. Phoebe Philo’s white Céline bags were graphic with interesting hardware details while her Chelsea boots had a chunky, mannish appeal. Massimo Giorgetti’s sandals at Emilio Pucci on the other hand were romantically dotted with pearls.

Story Credits

Text by Jeffrey Yan

This story first appeared in L’Officiel Singapore.