Tag Archives: Paris

French Chef of the Year: Christian Le Squer

French Chef of the Year: Christian Le Squer

Chef Christian Le Squer, who gave Paris another triple Michelin-starred restaurant earlier this year with Le Cinq restaurant at the Four Seasons George V, has been voted chef of the year by his confreres.

For the 30th edition of Le Chef magazine’s “Chef of the Year” awards, Le Squer took the coveted title after elevating Le Cinq to the exclusive three Michelin-starred club within about a year of taking over the reins of the kitchen.

The award is pitched as the only one of its kind in France for being voted upon by fellow chefs in the industry.

This year, about 6,000 industry chefs, pastry chefs, sommeliers and maitres d’hotels were invited to cast votes for their outstanding peers.

It comes as little surprise that Le Squer would take this year’s honor, given the amount of buzz generated following his takeover of the iconic dining destination.

The ambitious chef made no secret of his single-minded vision for the restaurant, proclaiming it his personal and professional mission to give it a third star.

His strategy was to do what he does best: classic French fare executed with masterful techniques honed at his previous post as chef of the Pavillon Ledoyen, where he also earned three Michelin stars.

French Chef of the Year: Christian Le Squer

While the menu at Le Cinq changes seasonally, some of his signature dishes include the turbot with truffled fingerling potato emulsion, crispy prawns from Bretagne and citrus emulsion, and whipped oysters.

The chef describes his cuisine as: “flavors, concentrated and moving.”

Likewise, Le Squer has also made it a priority to become active on social media, spending about an hour a day engaging with fans and sharing recipes.

Pastry chefs across France also expressed their admiration for Nina Metayer of Le Grand Restaurant in Paris, voting her the pastry chef of 2016 for her elegantly turned out desserts.

On Monday night, more than 900 guests – including 400 Michelin-starred chefs – gathered at a gala event at the Lido on the Champs-Elysées to honor this year’s winners and fete the magazine’s 30th anniversary.

Here are the winners:

Chef of the year: Christian Le Squer, for Le Cinq, Paris

Pastry chef of the year: Nina Metayer, Le Grand Restaurant, Paris

Sommelier of the year: Baptiste Cavagna, La Pyramide, Vienne

Service award: Francois Pipala, Paul Bocuse, Collonges au Mont d’Or

René Magritte Gets Centre Pompidou Show

René Magritte Gets Centre Pompidou Show

Missing Piece of Magritte Painting Found in UK

Missing Piece of Magritte Painting Found in UK

A missing piece of a painting by Belgian artist Rene Magritte has been discovered in a small museum in eastern England, concealed under one of his other works, it was announced last week.

Experts at Norwich Castle Museum and Art Gallery found the lower right quarter of “La Pose Enchantee” (The Enchanted Pose), which had until three years ago been thought lost, underneath “La Condition Humaine” (The Human Condition).

The first two quarters of the 89-year-old painting, which was only known by a black and white photograph, were discovered in 2013 under works by Magritte held in New York and Stockholm.

“All we need to discover now is where the fourth and final, upper-right-hand quarter is. Then this exciting art world jigsaw puzzle will be complete,” said Giorgia Bottinelli, curator at Norwich Castle.

“La Pose Enchantee” is a large painting showing two near identical female nudes, which was first exhibited in 1927.

There was correspondence relating to it in 1932, when it was returned to Magritte, but neither he nor anyone else mentioned it again. He died in 1967.

Then in 2013, conservationists at the Museum of Modern Art in New York discovered the upper left section of the missing work lay underneath their 1935 Magritte “The Portrait”.

The revelation prompted the Moderna Museet in Stockholm to examine one of its Magritte paintings, 1935’s “The Red Model” — which turned out to be the lower left quarter.

It is thought that the artist decided to cut up his painting and re-use the four canvases in preparation for a major exhibition in 1936.

“It seems that for some reason, Magritte must have decided to cut the painting into quarters, and then painted four completely different paintings over the top,” Bottinelli said.

“So our painting ‘La Condition Humaine’ has in fact been successfully hiding part of ‘La Pose Enchantee’ for more than 80 years.”

The clue to the hidden paintings lay in the edges of the painting which were, unusually for Magritte, painted over and round the stretcher.

Norwich conservator Alice Tavares da Silva spotted the discrepancy while examining the painting for an exhibition of Magritte’s work in Paris starting on September 21.

“It was a hugely exciting discovery so I immediately arranged to take the painting to the Hamilton Kerr Institute, at the University of Cambridge to be x-rayed and analysed,” she said.

“The results confirmed my initial observations that ‘La Condition Humaine’ was indeed the lower right-hand quarter of the missing painting.”

Versace Palazzo Empire

Limited Edition Versace Palazzo Empire

Back in March, Versace invited the public to participate in a competition called “7 bags for 7 cities” that would create designs for the iconic Versace Palazzo Empire bag. The seven limited edition versions feature seven famous and iconic fashion capitals that come in various colors.

To join the competition, participants took a photo of a monument, a unique place or an unseen side of the city that they chose. The images were then shared with Versace’s creative team who selected the final images that now make up the limited edition collection. The buildings in each city, are featured in black, while the skyline is filled with fading shades that help to get our attention. Paris is captured in plum and pink, New York in blue, Milan in orange and Tokyo in pink. Hong Kong, Beijing and Sao Paulo also feature in the limited-edition collection.

The Paris edition of the Versace "Palazzo Empire" bag.

The Paris edition of the Versace “Palazzo Empire” bag.

Versace has created only 10 models of each design. Starting from next week, the bags will arrive in their respective cities and will be sold in selected boutiques.

The original Versace Palazzo Empire is made from calfskin leather and can be carried by its handles or worn across the body. This iconic design is instantly recognizable and stands out thanks to the Medusa head detail – the symbol of Versace – on the front. Various special editions have previously been created, including models in crocodile skin and python leather.

Citroën Presents CXPERIENCE Concept in Paris

The end of September will see the Mondial de L’Automobile Paris 2016 open its doors to visitors. Despite the state of this year’s show, one car manufacturer to watch is Citroën. The firm will be taking advantage of the absence of a few major names to get more attention for its own unique efforts this year. The French automaker will be bringing the CXPERIENCE concept to the show and it is already drawing attention for its perspective on the executive car.Citroen-concept-car-3

The four-door hatchback stays true to the hallmark of French automotive design by keeping things smooth and elegant, without the aggression that typically marks German and Italian designs. In principle, this is done by keeping the wheels close to each corner as possible. For some reference, just compare this with the Vision Mercedes-Maybach 6. With a height of 1.37 meters and length of 4.85 meters, the car is one that comes off as sleek. According to Citroën, the exterior of the car features a glass roof as well as a concave rear window, providing minimal visual clutter. In place of wing mirrors, the car has cameras; headlamps are cleverly hidden within its wraparound front grille, which is said to have been inspired by current high-tech trends.

Within the car, Citroën uses breathable natural fabrics that are paired with wooden panelling. With four seats, the cabin is reminiscent of a cozy cocoon that envelops you in intentionally oversized seats. The entertainment system is integrated into each headrest, which ensures that voices never have to be raised. To contrast the citrus yellow seats, the brand has padded the flat floor with dark leather. This sense of space and de-cluttering is emphasized further by the rejection of many knobs and dials in favor of touch screens – a central display in the front and a shared tablet for rear-seat passengers, both boasting an interface developed for ease of use.Citroen-concept-car-2

As for propulsion, the concept is a plug-in hybrid, capable of covering 60km on battery power alone. “[The car] challenges convention to express a new vision of executive hatchbacks,” said Linda Jackson, Citroën Global CEO. “CXPERIENCE CONCEPT illustrates the brand’s capacity to deploy its “Be Different, Feel Good” promise in this segment.”

 

Maison & Objet Paris 2016

Maison & Objet Paris 2016: 4 Important Changes

This coming week will see the biannual trade fair Maison & Objet Paris add a few new additions to its calendar later this year. The event, to be held at the Paris-Nord Villepinte, is expected to attract more than 70,000 visitors and 3,000 international brands over five days. We take a look at the four major changes that guests can look forward to.

Textiles join the Maison hub

While the textiles industry was the last to have its own Hall at the event, this year will see it join the home décor hub for a second year in a row. Decorative textile brands will, for the second year, join the home decor hub, with high-end linens and a selection of other textile brands joining together in two separate areas this season to promote visibility: the “Elegant” section (the entrance of Hall 4) and “Complements” (the center of Hall 5A).

Trend-setting through design

Focusing on trends, this section of the fair is one of the largest and will be located in the Objet hub. This section will now be expanding from Hall 6 into part of Hall 5A. The five hubs exhibiting the predicted design trends for the upcoming seasons are: Cook+Design, Easy Living, Kids, Fashion and Beloved (tech-oriented.)

The launch of a new hub: Influences

Taking up Halls 7 and 8, the new Influences hub will be celebrating its inauguration with a special focus on exclusivity for the new season. Brands from sectors such as Lighting, Bath & Wellness and Outdoors will showcase their expertise and ideas for creating unique, high-end and exclusive designs.

Collaboration and synergy

Also located in the new Influences hub, the “Now! Design à vivre” sector will be specializing in new design and eco-friendly products. The sector will run alongside the “Scènes d’interieure” gallery that features bespoke high-end decorative arts, the space is expected to create a dialogue between the two areas. Providing an overall vision of design today, the objective is to strengthen “the links between contemporary design and luxury. It also shows how both worlds mutually benefit from one another.”

Comme des Garçons

Aesthetic Debt: What High Fashion Owes Asia

Who says fashion exists in its own bubble? Designers and houses today are, more than ever, drawing inspiration and references from all over the world. Nowhere is this more apparent than in high fashion’s relationship with the East. The seductive Orient has long been a goldmine for decorative touches. Christian Dior’s love of the East led him to create a dress – in the beautiful New Look silhouette with its nipped waist and elaborate volume – covered in Japanese scribble lifted from an old print. The words? Something about bowel movements and a tummy ache. A funny yet telling example, if there were one, about the results of good intentions and unwitting execution.

Gladly, designers today have the luxury of research and the availability of a global world view (thank you, Google) that’s resulted in a more intelligent way of mining the East for inspiration – and it’s one that should be celebrated. The New York Metropolitan Museum of Art’s 2015 key exhibition, China: Through the Looking Glass, was a significant showcase of the East’s influences on fashion. What it achieved was a plain demonstration that China has had an aesthetic influence on virtually every high fashion designer. The “looking glass” element to the exhibition, however, should be a strong reminder that China and indeed the rest of Asia aren’t far-away oriental mysteries. Its relevance and influence almost demand that designers picking references do so with intelligent sensitivity rather than with reductive pastiche.

Japan in Paris

Maison Margiela

Maison Margiela

Two of the most important Japanese designers – Rei Kawakubo and Yohji Yamamoto – have been in the business for upwards of 40 years, with starts in the 1970s and 1980s. It’s intriguing to assess their aesthetics and impact on the industry. We must remember that the two were so influential and notable in Paris fashion because of the contrariness of what they were showing. When Western – that is, Euro-centric – fashion built dresses around the glamorous, sexualised female body, Kawakubo and Yamamoto stormed in and offered inventive forms, silhouettes, cuts, and an insistent use of the colour black. Indeed, the Yamamoto brand has been revered for its masterful craftsmanship, protective embrace of the body, and an intelligence that builds a sense of safety for the wearer – clothes as the proverbial armour.

Kawakubo, too, gained fame for being unrelentingly herself. Comme des Garçons has become a model brand (pictured top) with its numerous offshoot lines – Junya Watanabe, Noir Kei Ninomiya and Ganryu are all by Kawakubo’s protégés – and the opinion-leading Dover Street Market stores. The underpinning artistic strength remains the Comme des Garçons mainline designed by Kawakubo herself, which has been unfailingly unique, daring and avant-garde.

Kenzo today represents upbeat accessibility thanks to creative directors Carol Lim and Humberto Leon. The Opening Ceremony founders bring a commercial New York line of thought to the brand that keeps it in line with the founder’s original spirit. The man himself, Kenzo Takada, opened his boutique in Paris, named Jungle Jap, selling his bright and fun multicultural prints. One of the key pillars of Kenzo fashion is a sense of fun and youth. Soon, Kenzo will launch a collaborative collection with H&M, one in a series of special edition releases with the likes of brands like Lanvin, Maison Martin Margiela, Balmain, Isabel Marant and Karl Lagerfeld. Onward to the future, indeed.

Speaking of the future, one must never forget the Japanese brand that pushed technical and creative boundaries. Issey Miyake is important to fashion because of his loving embrace of technology and the brand’s explorations of the form and function of dress. Miyake’s earliest works were built around the Japanese kimono, deconstructing the traditional garment to get to the core of what makes foldable garments work. Toying with dimensionality, he developed a line of clothes that were softly sculptural. His famous heat-pressed pleating technique birthed the Pleats Please line, and the shaped yet draped silhouette has been unique since. In the FW16 collection, current creative director Yoshiyuki Miyamae pays respectful homage with garments constructed with pleating techniques that the brand calls “baked stretched” and “3D steam-stretched”. The brand remains, in its spirit, venturous in exploring the effect of technology on fabric and garment construction.

Cultural Influences

Valentino

Valentino

The highest echelons of fashion owe an aesthetic debt to Asia. The original greats from Paris such as Christian Dior, Yves Saint Laurent, Paul Poiret, Madeleine Vionnet and Coco Chanel took inspirations from various facets of chinoiserie and japonism. There’s an element of pastiche that can’t be disregarded, though one can chalk it down to the times. Yves Saint Laurent paid tribute, in the 1970s, to cheongsam and qipao silhouettes, topped with hats and jackets inspired by imperial Chinese dress. In Tom Ford’s final collection for the house in the fall of 2004, such looks were amplified to highlight sensuality and sexual boldness. The figure-hugging and high-slit clothes demonstrated Ford’s high-octane sex-sells mentality and his ability to subvert traditional dress forms to suit the times.

Coco Chanel was a famously enamored collector of lacquered coromandel screens from China, and decorated her home and offices in Rue Cambon with more than 30 of them. Karl Lagerfeld’s collections have built on the obsession, most notably with a 2009 Métiers d’Art show in Shanghai that played to his strength of combining the heritage of Chanel with the needs of modern women. The result: a modern Chinese attitude worn with the insouciant bouclé skirt suits of the house. Lagerfeld then took a journey to India in the Paris-Bombay Métiers d’Art 2012 show: traditional Indian dress styles such as salwar trousers (voluminous pants which taper sharply near the ankles) and kurti (long, tunic-length blouses) got paired with Chanel’s iconic pearls and tweeds. When it comes to making references, Lagerfeld is a master; there’s an ease to the mix that belies deep research and finesse in construction.

John Galliano furthered Dior’s love of the Orient when he was designing for the house with the famously splendid SS07 and SS09 haute couture shows. Spring of 2007 saw modern geishas in chartreuse-, lavender- and rose-hued Bar silhouettes cut in silk-taffeta with an origami-style twist. In 2009, the ubiquitous willow pattern on Chinese ceramics sneaked under the linings, on the insides, and around the outsides of the dresses – a delicacy to the clothes lent by invoking a key product of trade that China has shared with the West for centuries.

Today’s Take

Valentino

Valentino

Modern couturiers play a more nuanced game of reference-picking. Consider Valentino’s Spring 2016 haute couture showing. The silhouettes and thrust of the look was the otherworldly and ultra-feminine signature that Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli have become acclaimed for. Kimono-style coats and robes with hand-painted carps and dragons draw from the mythological wellspring of the East. This followed the visual story in the brand’s Pre-Fall 2016 collection which featured hand-painted and intarsia-ed dragons and swallows, pyjamas with brocaded swans, and shift dresses with genteel 10th-century bird-and-flower paintings.

In Gucci’s FW16 collection, Alessandro Michele sent a dizzying number of 70 looks down his runway. The Michele method is to create for a variety of women – different characters daring to partake of and play in dress-up characterisation. Two Asian-informed looks strolled down the runway: the first, a minidress with an Italian sun motif and a Mao collar; the second, a floor-length qipao with pink fur trim on the sleeves and an embroidered phoenix pattern.

At Louis Vuitton and Kenzo, the brands looked towards a cartoon idealisation of women. Nicolas Ghesquière has one of the best knacks in the industry for tapping into youthful energy and giving it a sophisticated turn. Recall Spring 2016’s advertising campaign: the virtual avatar of Lightning (one of the lead characters in the Final Fantasy games) swings around a bag, strikes poses and looks airbrushed to perfection. It is worth noting that the Lightning character in the games is a combatant – the strongest playable character, even. This is reflected in the clothes, too: the urban-heroine sensibility is carried into FW16’s exaggerated silhouettes, emphasis on heavy boots, panelled bodysuits and armour-like leather bustiers. At Kenzo, the train of thought was Sailor Moon, beloved ’90s shōjo icon of female liberation and strength. It took the spirit of confidence and quintessential femininity, and translated it into an abundance of empire waistlines and deconstructed duffel coats with a smattering of reworked archival iris, dandelion and tiger prints (Kenzo is known for its print work).

Dior

Dior

On a more technical front, we look back to Raf Simons’ debut haute couture collection for Dior in the Fall 2012 season. The collection saw Simons impose abstract Sterling Ruby prints onto coats and dresses using an Indonesian technique seen through a French eye. The original technique ikat is an early form of warp printing. Warp printing involves dyeing the fabric on the yarn before it is woven, as opposed to traditional methods in which a print is stamped onto a finished yard of fabric. The resulting print is warbly and far from sharp, and – to quote Mr Simons – “has the quality of a brush stroke”. In the 18th century, this was the same quality that led to the French creation of Chiné a la Branche, a variation on the ikat print technique that produced small, watercolor-esque floral prints on silk taffeta fabrics that found favour and fashion on the backs of Marie Antoinette and her contemporaries.

Today, what Asia represents for luxury and high fashion is fertile ground for growth and exploration. The massive Chinese economy offers opportunities for growth with a huge consumer base longing for the prestige and sheen of luxury. What fashion designers have to remember, then, is to pay their audiences back with the beauty they’ve borrowed.

This article was first published in L’Officiel Singapore.

Lotte New York Palace

Top 10 ‘Pokétels’ New York City: Catch ‘Em All

Listen up Pokémon Go fans: One hotel-booking site has found one major city with a host of Pokéstops and Pokégyms that any fan of the game would be happy to hear about. Hotels.com now provides users with a list of what they call the best “Pokétels” in the US with several found in New York City.

Alright, we grant you that it is slightly unusual for us to cover a game such as Pokémon Go. Needless to say, the global phenomenon is so powerful that it has swept up major names in luxury such as The Peninsula, the Four Seasons and the St. Regis. Yes, Pokémon Go has indeed come to the rarefied world of high end living, ready or not.

With nine out of 10 New York hotels making the list, it is clear that the city is a hotspot for those looking to get their fix for their addiction to the game. Cashing in on the craze, the site reveals that the top spot is occupied by none other than The Towers at Lotte New York Palace. With 11 Pokéstops and Pokégyms within 500 feet and another 231 within a 1.25-mile radius, the area is certainly a hotspot for those looking to expand their collection.

The geo-location-based game has taken off in various locations in recent weeks, which gets players off their couches and out exploring the world. Venturing out to see the city landmarks, monuments and public spaces, the game has even gotten players considering visiting new destinations. The majority of respondents agreed they’d take free Wifi over free breakfast if they had to choose, and expressed a booking preference for hotels that are Pokéstops.

While New York is the city to beat in the US, it is in fact Paris that holds the title of home to the most Pokétels, with six out of 10 spots taken by the French capital. We bring you the full Hotels.com list of top 10 US hotels within 500 feet of Pokéstops and Pokégyms:

4 Must-See Art Exhibitions, Paris

Mexican modern art, a Russian’s private art collection, and a major Magritte retrospective: just some of the not-to-be-missed art exhibitions AFP Relaxnews has picked out for you for the coming season.

Fantin-Latour à Fleur de Peau

From September 14, 2016 to February 12, 2017 at the Musée du Luxembourg

This is the first retrospective of the nineteenth-century painter’s work since the Grand Palais exhibition in 1982. It will include emblematic works by the artist who is known for his still lifes and group portraits.

Henri Fantin-Latour, 1872, oil on canvas.

Henri Fantin-Latour, 1872, oil on canvas. “Fantin-Latour à Fleur de Peau” from September 14, 2016 to February 12, 2017 at the Musée du Luxembourg. © Rmn-Grand Palais (musée d’Orsay) / Photo Hervé Lewandowski

Magritte, The Treachery of Images

From September 21, 2016 to January 23, 2017 at the Centre Pompidou

The Centre Pompidou is holding a René Magritte retrospective which will bring together a large number of both well-known and less familiar works by the Belgian artist, from public and private collections. Pictured top is The Anger of Gods, 1960, 80cm x 70cm oil on canvas, private collection.

Picasso-Giacometti

From October 4, 2016 to February 5, 2017 at the Musée Picasso

In partnership with the Alberto and Annette Giacometti Foundation, the Musée Picasso will shine a light on the relationship between Pablo Picasso and Alberto Giacometti through the artists’ private archives.

Mexico 1900 – 1950 Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco…

Tiburcio Sánchez de la Barquera (1837-1902), Escandón Arango Family Portrait, 1867, oil on canvas. © INBA/Museo Nacional de Arte Photo © Francisco Kochen

Tiburcio Sánchez de la Barquera (1837-1902), Escandón Arango Family Portrait, 1867, oil on canvas. © INBA/Museo Nacional de Arte Photo © Francisco Kochen

From October 5, 2016 to January 23, 2017 at the Grand Palais

This exhibition will be the first in France to provide an overview of Mexican modern art from the revolution until the mid-twentieth century. Big names such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo will be included, as well as lesser-known artists such as Rosa Rolanda and Nahui Ollin. Visitors will also be able to see examples of nineteenth-century academic art.

Icons of Modern Art. The Shchukin Collection

"Icons of Modern Art. The Shchukin collection" from October 22, 2016 to February 20, 2017 at the Fondation Louis Vuitton: "Portrait of a Man with a Newspaper (Chevalier X)" by André Derain, 1911-1914.

“Portrait of a Man with a Newspaper (Chevalier X)” by André Derain, 1911-1914.

From October 22, 2016 to February 20, 2017 at the Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris

The Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris is set to hold an exhibition of works collected by Sergei Shchukin, a Russian who was interested in 20th-century French art. Thanks to the cooperation of the Hermitage Museum and the Pushkin State Museum, the public will be able to see 130 pieces by major artists such as Monet, Van Gogh, Picasso, Degas, Renoir, Rousseau and Toulouse-Lautrec.

5 Fashion Exhibitions, 4 Style Capitals

The style capitals of the world are not just home to runway shows. Over the next few weeks, Paris, New York, Venice and London will be hosting several exhibitions that feature iconic designs by equally iconic designers. Just looking through the list makes us wish we could pack our bags and hop on the next flight to these destinations just to catch a glimpse of fashion history. Join us as we take a look at five exceptional fashion exhibitions.

Anatomy of a Collection at the Palais Galliera, ParisAnatomy of a Collection at the Palais Galliera

More than a hundred garments and accessories are set to be on display till October 23 at the City of Paris Fashion Museum. Told in an unconventional way, the garments take us on a journey through the history of fashion. Highlights include a pajama suit worn by the British actress and model Tilda Swinton, a dress that belonged to Empress Josephine, and Marie-Antoinette’s corset.

Undressed: A Brief History of Underwear at the V&A Museum, LondonHistory-Of-Underwear

Exploring garments that have long been hidden from the public eye, the exhibition starts with men’s and women’s underwear that date back to the 18th century. The 200 pieces and archive documents will be on display at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London till March 12, 2017 . The exhibition looks at the role that underwear played in history and how the notion of the ideal body has changed over the years.

Culture Chanel exhibition: The woman who reads at the Ca’Pesaro, Veniceculture_chanel_.a34ee095626.h0

The seventh installment of the Culture Chanel international exhibition will be held at the Ca’Pesaro International Gallery of Modern Art in Venice from September 17 until January 8, 2017. Having held a place in the heart of Gabrielle Chanel, the new instalment will see the city exhibit 350 works of authors who played a significant role in the designer’s creative life. The works of Homer, Plato, Virgil, Sophocles, Lucretia, Montaigne, Cervantes, Madame de Sévigné and Jean Cocteau will be displayed in the manner of a library.

Tenue correcte exigée, quand le vêtement fait scandale (Appropriate dress required: when clothing causes a scandal) at the Musée des Arts décoratifs, ParisBall Gown, Viktor & Rolf (Dutch, founded 1993), spring/summer 2010; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, Friends of The Costume Institute Gifts, 2011 © The Metropolitan Museum of Art, by Anna-Marie Kellen

From December 1 till April 23, 2017, the exhibition will showcase garments that have courted controversy and criticism in the past only to become everyday apparel. All the garments on display, including the shirt-dress, the female tuxedo and the miniskirt, were condemned at one time or another in history. In addition to the “scandalous” clothing, visitors will be able to peruse portraits, caricatures and advertisements.

Masterworks: Unpacking Fashion at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

From November 8, 2016 to February 5, 2017 the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art will dissect the way in which its collecting strategy has changed from an encyclopaedic approach to creating a body of masterworks. Concentrating on the last 10 years of purchases, the exhibition will highlight around 60 of these masterworks.

art-exhibition-paris-magis

Attend These: 6 Design Exhibitions, Paris

You might already be familiar with big-name shows such as Maison & Objet (from September 2 – 6) and Paris Design Week (September 3 – 10), but there are a number of smaller, off-beat gems in every corner of the French capital to check out too. Here are six design exhibitions even the most critical of design fans would love.

Muji Pop-Up Exhibition, September 2 – 25 2016; Rue des Blancs Manteaux
art-exhibition-paris-muji

The Muji pop up exhibition will focus on the brand’s visual identity. © Muji

Founded in Japan in 1980, Muji’s “no-brand” branding ironically made it a household name with its focus on product quality above all else. It is easy to see how one of its founders, Ikko Tanaka – an integral Japanese designer in the 20th century – conveyed the Muji spirit to everything, including the poster designs; a selection of these will be on display at the pop-up exhibition next month.

“Roger Tallon, Design in Motion”, September 8, 2016 – January 8, 2017; Musée des Arts Décoratifs
art-exhibition-paris-Roger-Tallon

Roger Tallon and his models for the TGV 001, TGV Duplex, and TGV Atlantique trains.
© Les Arts Décoratifs, Paris / A.D.A.G.P. 2016

Highly regarded as one of France’s pioneering industrial designer, Roger Tallon might have passed away in 2011 but his remarkable work lives on. He was responsible for the design of many trains, such as the TGV Duplex, the Eurostar and the Montmartre funicular railway. Throughout his 60-year career, the prolific designer also had the route maps for the RER (Paris’ suburban rail network), Wimpy chair M400 spiral staircase, 3T tableware and Teleavia portable TV to his name. Now, many of his lesser-known works in the form of drawings, photos, documents and models – which he donated to the museum in 2008 – will finally be on display to public.

“The Spirit of Bauhaus”, October 19, 2016 – February 26, 2017; Musée des Arts Décoratifs
art-exhibition-paris-bauhaus

Poster for the 1923 Bauhaus Exhibition in Weimar.
© Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin

Marcel Breur, creator of tubular furniture, and photographer Florence Henri (student of Paul Klee and Vassily Kandinsky) both had one thing in common: they both attended the Bauhaus art school in Weimar, Dessau and Berlin from 1919 to 1933. The institution, famous for producing many influential artists and designers brought about a new approach to daily living by bridging the gap between all disciplines of art, including music, photography, architecture and even engineering. The Musée des Arts Décoratifs pays homage to this artistic movement by not only displaying original Bauhaus pieces, but also via the historical periods and their art forms which fueled the school’s spirit.

Exhibition of Jean Nouvel furniture, October 27 – February 12, 2017; Musée des Arts Décoratifs
art-exhibition-paris-jean-nouvel

Triptychs, 2014, walnut and colored mirrors (Gagosian Gallery and Galerie Patrick Segui).
© Aline Coquelle

You might know Jean Nouvel for his architectural work but his furniture designs are mostly unknown pleasures. From 1987 to present day, the French architect has more than a hundred designs to his name. These will be displayed in various parts of the museum together with their advertising campaigns, of which he also designed in 1998.

“1976-2016: 40 Years of Magis Dreams”, August 31 – October 3, 2016; Pompidou Centre store (main image)

Italian furniture company Magis celebrates its 40th anniversary this year with a retrospective of its history and most recent collections. The mini exhibition, which coincides with Paris Design Week, will also feature Magis’ symbolic cast iron mule, which was specially designed by the brand’s 76-year-old founder, Eugenio Perazza.

AD Interiors exhibition dedicated to collections, September 3 – 18 2016; Monnaie de Paris
art-exhibition-paris-ad-interiors

The Ora-Ito-designed kitchen for the 2016 AD Interiors exhibition which this year is dedicated to collections.
© Ora-ïto / “AD Intérieurs 2016, Univers de collectionneurs”

Six years ago, Architectural Digest magazine celebrated its 10th anniversary with its first AD Interiors exhibition, where 10 handpicked designers and interior decorators had to design a room using their style and expertise. For this year’s iteration, participants –including Ora-Ïto, Tristan Auer and Fabrice Ausset – have to create décor for a room based on the theme of the collections.

5 Must-Visit Design Exhibitions L'esprit du Bauhaus

5 Must-Visit Design Exhibitions Fall 2016

The world of decoration and design kicks off a new season with the Maison & Objet exhibition in Paris, which will be held from September 2 to 6, 2016. It is the first in a raft of interesting upcoming design exhibitions around the globe.

1. Playing on an amalgamation of “House of Cards” and “Game of Thrones”, the “House of Games” is the theme of the upcoming Maison & Objet interior design trade fair. Gearing up for exhibition in the Maison & Objet Inspirations Space from September 2 to 6, this year’s concept was conceived by trendspotter Vincent Gregoire from the NellyRodi agency.

True to its name, “House of Games” paints an offbeat kind of fantasy, while mirroring the need for games in modern society. It is a revival of baroque style combined with Alice in Wonderland eclecticism: masked balls and private clubs bask in a fin-de-siecle ambiance, while acknowledging the increasing popularity of board games. On that note, feather artisan Julien Vermuelen’s creations (pictured below) might best represent this year’s theme.

Feathered samurai by Julien Vermeulen © Julien Vermeulen All rights reserved / Maison & Objet 2016

Feathered samurai by Julien Vermeulen © Julien Vermeulen
All rights reserved / Maison & Objet 2016

2. “How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior” from October 1, 2016 to April 23, 2017 at the MoMA, New York

With this exhibition, New York’s Museum of Modern Art will explore the complex partnerships, materials and processes that have shaped interiors from the 1920s to the 1950s. The exhibition will bring together over 200 objects, including some from the MoMA collections. Big names in design will be featured, including Le Corbusier, Eileen Gray, Charlotte Perriand, Alvar Alto, and Charles and Ray Eames.

5 Must-Visit Design Exhibitions L'esprit du Bauhaus

Triptychs (2014) in walnut and colored mirrors by Jean Nouvel (Gagosian Gallery and Galerie Patrick Segui). © Aline Coquelle

3. “The Spirit of Bauhaus” from October 19, 2016 to February 26, 2017 at the Musée des Arts décoratifs, Paris

From 1919 to 1933, the Bauhaus art school in Weimar, Dessau and Berlin produced many influential artists and designers including Vassily Kandinsky, Marcel Breur, who invented bent tubular steel furniture, and the photographer Florence Henri, who took classes with Paul Klee. By bringing together painters, architects, craftsmen, engineers, actors, musicians, photographers and designers, the school created a new approach to daily living. The Musée des Arts décoratifs will pay tribute to this artistic movement via the historical periods and art forms which fueled its spirit, and will also display original Bauhaus pieces.

5 Must-Visit Design Exhibitions L'esprit du Bauhaus

Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut. Architect: Louis Kahn. © Architectural Archives of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Photo by Lionel Freedman.

4. “Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture” from November 5, 2016 to January 31, 2017 at the San Diego Museum of Art

The renowned American architect Louis Kahn is the subject of an exhibition in California’s San Diego Museum of Art. His most notable works include the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas, and the Capital Complex in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The exhibition will include architectural models, original designs, photographs and films.

5. “Konstantin Grcic – Panorama” from November 25, 2016 to February 26, 2017 at the Hong Kong Design Institute

Konstantin Grcic, who designed such iconic pieces as the Chair One and the Mayday lamp, is considered one of the leading designers of our time. This new exhibition at the Hong Kong Design Institute examines the German designer’s career through drawings and installations specifically created by Grcic for the event.

Faena Hotel Miami,best design hotel by Virtuoso

Top 10 Luxury Hotels 2016: Virtuoso Selection

Luxury travel experts have christened a sumptuous villa set amongst the olive groves and lemon trees of Puglia, Italy their hotel of the year.

Winners of Virtuoso’s 10th annual Best of the Best awards, representing the standardbearers in luxury accommodations, were revealed at a conference in Las Vegas this week.

Taking the top title of “Hotel of the Year” is Italy’s Borgo Egnazia, a collection of white villas designed to evoke a traditional Apulian village, complete with piazza and alleyways.

The sprawling resort also features a championship 18-hole golf course, beach clubs and a renowned spa. Rooms are decorated in rich hues of cream, white and beige for a calming, restful effect.

It’s not the first time the Borgo Egnazia has been recognized within the industry. The hotel has also been awarded by Travel + Leisure, Condé Nast Traveler, Tatler and Leading Hotels of the World.

The Faena Hotel in Miami, Florida, was named best design hotel by Virtuoso

The Faena Hotel in Miami, Florida, was named best design hotel by Virtuoso

For the awards, Virtuoso surveyed their network of 390 luxury travel agencies and their 11,400 travel advisors around the world. Membership is invitation-only. Properties chosen belong to the group’s own network of 1,200 hotels, resorts, villas and private islands, located in 100 countries.

“Borgo Egnazia and the area of Puglia is one of the exciting new destinations in Italy that one could ever encounter,” said Annette Sordini of Protravel International, a Virtuoso agency.

“The hotel has an amazing ambiance, warm and friendly people, incredible food and a spiritual spa.”

Here are the other winners:

  • Best achievement in design: Faena Hotel Miami Beach, Florida
  • Best culinary experience: The Farmhouse Restaurant, Farmhouse Inn, California
  • Best bar: The New York Edition, New York
  • Best Family Program: Rosewood San Miguel de Allende, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
  • Best Spa: Grand Hotel Tremezzo, Lake Como, Italy
  • Most Innovative Guest Experience: Belmond Hotel das Cataratas, Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil
  • Sustainable Tourism Leadership: andBeyond Phinda Private Game Reserve, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
  • One to Watch: Hotel Eden Rome, Dorchester Collection, Rome, Italy
  • Hotelier of the Year: José Silva – Four Seasons Hotel George V, Paris, Paris, France
Design Festivals Around the World

Visit These: 6 Design Festivals Around the World

Pay attention, designers and design aficionados. As global festival season approaches, cities around the world vie for top spot as design capital of the world. Here, we bring you six of the best design festivals from around the world that you should have on your itinerary, should you be lucky enough to be planning a trip abroad.

Helsinki Design Week ( September 1 – 11)

As the largest of its kind in the Nordics, the Helsinki Design Week (pictured top) is a multidisciplinary design festival that hosts close to 200 events throughout the week. Held with the aim of promoting emerging talent, trends and international design collaborations, the annual event has successfully seen crowds of up to 120,000 people turn up previously.

Paris Design Week (September 3 – 10)

This Paris-wide event – organized to overlap with Maison & Objet – holds events in more than 300 venues in five areas in the city. Seven countries will participate this year, namely China, Ukraine, Estonia, Finland, the Flanders region on Belgium, Czech Republic, Lithuania and Denmark. Expect a cultural mash-up of exhibitions, cocktails and promenades as different nationalities culminate in the French capital.

London Design Festival (September 17- 25)

Known for collaborating with museums and cultural centers in the city, London Design Festival is organised to promote the city as a creative hub and gateway to the world of design. Its “Landmark Projects” installations program, in particular, has seen some of the world’s best designers commission work for it, including Alex Chinneck’s “A Bullet from a Shooting Star” in 2015.

Vienna Design Week (September 30 – October 9)

For a design festival that draws crowds of over 360,000 visitors, it is no wonder Vienna Design Week is already into its ninth edition. The annual festival chooses a district within the city to focus on so there’s something new to look forward to every year. This year, the spotlight is on the 5th Viennese municipal district of Margareten.

Design Week Mexico (October 5 – 9)
Design-festival-2016

Temporary installations for Mexico Design Week

Like a hub that connects artists, architects, designers and entrepreneurs to the public, Mexican design week is an accessible platform of events. Its dedication to bridging this gap earned it the appointment of World Design Capital for 2018.

Dutch Design Week (October 22 – 30)

As the largest design festival in Northern Europe, Dutch Design Week expects more than 275,000 visitors and 2,500 designers yearly. Unlike many others, this visionary festival chooses to focus on designs on the future instead.

4 Brazilian Restaurants 2016

4 Brazilian Restaurants: Rio Away From Rio

Not all Olympics fans will be lucky enough to go to Brazil (we know we aren’t!). In any case, you could argue that something as big as the Olympics is perfect for television but whoever you are and wherever you might be, food is not something best enjoyed vicariously. This is by no means perfect but maybe try Brazilian cuisine (hopefully not for the first time) at one of the four popular restaurants the AFP has picked out for you from around the world.

Maloka (Paris, France)

As Oka restaurant moves to the 5th district of Paris at the end of November, Rio de Janeiro-born chef Raphaël Rego has transformed its old location into a new restaurant called Maloka. With solid experience at Taillevent and L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon behind him, Rego transports his customers to Brazil with no stopovers, serving local cuisine made with ingredients imported from his homeland. Parisians are introduced to cassava, a new twist on the traditional feijoada (a pork and black bean stew), and pao de queijo (cheese rolls) as they partake of genuine caïpirinhas, Brazil’s national cocktail. This has become a hot culinary destination in Paris since its recent opening.

28, rue de la Tour d’Auvergne, 75009 Paris

Beach Bistro 96 (New York, USA)

Rockaway Beach — a free beach accessible from Manhattan via the subway — has become a cool neighborhood of Queens beloved by surfers. Since May, a chef has been attracting foodies, and even a New York Times restaurant critic, to his Beach Bistro 96 here. A native of the town of Santos, in southern Brazil’s São Paulo state, Carlos Varella is the Big Apple’s latest hot favorite. Like his fellow Brazilian Raphaël Rego in France, he prepares culinary specialties from his home country such as pao de queijo. This former professional surfer’s menu also includes picanha, a cut of beef with a layer of fat that protects it during grilling.

95-19 Rockaway Beach Boulevard, Beach 96th Street, The Rockaways, New York

Cabana (Newcastle, UK)

The latest Brazilian eatery to open in the UK is in Newcastle. Cabana restaurants have opened their tenth address in this northeastern English city, offering a relaxed atmosphere and traditional Brazilian cuisine that has been given a modern twist for a new audience. This new business has also sourced some of its furnishings from Brazil’s poor communities such as the recycled jeans from a favela in São Paulo that have been used to line the restaurant’s chairs. Cabana already operates in London and Leeds, and plans to open another restaurant in Southampton in the near future.

117 Newgate Street, Newcastle upon Tyne

Regina’s Farm (Fort Lauderdale, USA)

If you live in Florida, Regina’s Farm can transport you to the Brazilian countryside. Regina, a young Brazilian living in Fort Lauderdale was missing her native state of Minas Gerais, so decided to recreate a traditional Brazilian farm in her backyard. Brazilian culinary specialties are prepared on a wood stove in the company of roosters and chickens. Regina serves soups, cheese bread, fresh guarapa (iced sugarcane juice) and much more. The farm is a non-profit-making venture, which is only open to diners on Saturday.

1101 Middle St., Fort Lauderdale

Naked Restaurant The Bunyadi Heads to Paris

London’s naked pop-up restaurant is old news by now, having made headlines around the world and attracting more than 46,000 people to their waitlist. For those living under a rock, the restaurant, dubbed The Bunyadi (meaning natural in Hindi), is an eatery where customers basically eat in the buff. Unfortunately for Londoners – but fortunately for Parisians – The Bunyadi will close one month earlier than originally intended, and move across the Channel to the French capital.

The reason isn’t because of the lack of interest from the Londoners. Believe it or not, it is global warming. This year saw an unusually hot summer in London, which posed problems for the sans-aircon venue. Sweaty naked people eating together is probably as appealing as it sounds. Coupled with high interest from the French, The Bunyadi has decided to move house early. London fans need not be sad, however, for founder Seb Lyall reveals that a naked private members’ club will be launched in the city, where naturists in London can get bare with like-minded folks.

the-bunyadi-london-closes-1

With The Bunyadi, it is all about the bare necessities. Similar to the London edition, Paris’ outlet will see au naturel decor, as diners tuck into raw and organic dishes. Cell phones are also banned, and the dishes prepared without the use of electricity or gas. Lest you think this is mere copy-pasting, the Paris outpost will feature a different menu.

‘It’s really positive and I’m excited to be going to Paris,” said Lyall. “We’ll be taking our team there and finding a venue…People came over from Paris, people in the industry, and said, ‘we’d love you to open over here.’”

The Bunyadi served their final meals in London this weekend and will be flying over to Paris, where they hope to open for two-months starting September.

Design: Campana Brothers Turn Trash Into Art

One man’s trash is another man’s art it seems, especially for the Campana brothers. The Brazilian designer duo made up of Humberto and Fernando find their inspiration from what many would not think twice about discarding. Their studio in Sao Paulo, Brazil is filed with a slew of items made from the unlikeliest of materials.

From armchairs made from rag dolls and stuffed toy crocodiles, the designers have made a name for themselves in the design world with their quirky creations. Unlike a normal studio, the brothers who have no formal training in design. What they have is a team of artisans who not only sew leather and brush fleeces but also enter data on computers. “This is a laboratory,” says Humberto, the elder of the brothers at 63. “We are always seeking new forms of expression” added the former law student.

They pride themselves in surprising viewers with their work, such as sofas made out of cardboard and plastic packaging that is transformed into chairs. Another design that has caught the attention of fans is the ‘Favelas’. The artwork, as explained by Fernando, is their interpretation of how Brazilians living in the country’s slums build their homes out of objects they find in the street.

While they have had their work featured in some of the world’s most prestigious institutions such as New York’s MOMA and the Pompidou Center in Paris, the brothers also give back to society. They work with small cooperatives and artisans to support traditional local crafts to help show off the cutural riches of the country.

Alpine Vision Gran Turismo photo

Automakers Pass on Paris Motor Show

The upcoming Paris Motor Show will be marked by the notable absence of several major car makers, such as Ford, Mazda and Volvo, as well a boutique player we were looking forward to seeing, Alpine. [UPDATE] It is now being reported that Aston Martin, Bentley, Bugatti, Chevrolet, Lamborghini, Lotus, McLaren and Rolls Royce will all be skipping the Paris Motor Show. These major names in luxury will instead be saving their big reveals for the Geneva Motor Show. Ford and Mazda have shunned the French capital’s show to focus on their own special promotional events and operations in dealerships.

Given that the list we have seen is quite extensive, who’s left at Paris in terms of luxury names you might wonder. According to news reports, fans of luxury motors will still be able to visit the Parisian stands of Ferrari, Jaguar and Porsche to check out the new Spider, the restyled F-Type or the second-generation Panamera.

Volvo has been out of the picture for some time, following the last Paris Motor Show in late 2014. The firm will now focus on just one major event per continent each year, deciding to opt for the Geneva Motor Show rather than Paris this time.

Mazda will also be passing up on the Parisian rendezvous. Unsurprisingly, the firm doesn’t feel it gets enough visibility at such a “huge” show, where it’s hard to make an impact. What’s more, the schedule for announcing its upcoming models didn’t coincide with the timing of the Paris show. The Japanese automaker will therefore be organizing its own client marketing and communications operation during the time of the show.

The biggest blow for Paris Motor Show organizers was no doubt news that US manufacturer Ford won’t be attending the 2016 event. The manufacturer will instead be holding a series of events in dealerships in major French cities and carrying out its own promotional campaigns rather than relying on the Motor Show.

Finally, one surprise no-shower for 2016 is Alpine. Although the famous French brand made its comeback this year, Paris show-goers won’t be able to check out the new Alpine Vision, unveiled this year, with a design echoing the legendary Alpine Berlinette A110.

Nevertheless, there’ll still be almost 200 car brands heading to Paris for the event, set to showcase new models like the latest Peugeot 3008, the new Citroën C3 and the restyled Renault Clio.

In 2014, the Paris Motor Show welcomed almost 1.25 million visitors.

The Paris Motor Show runs October 1 to 16, 2016, at the Paris Expo Porte de Versailles exhibition center in Paris, France.

This story is also available in Bahasa Indonesia. Read it here: Absennya Beberapa Pabrikan di Paris Motor Show

Paris Auto Show 2016

Paris Couture Week: Chopard High Jewelry Shines

Ralph & Russo, together with Chopard, are known to host some of the most elaborate and luxurious dinner parties, which usually involve the rich and famous. Their latest event earlier this month was no exception. Held on 4 July at the Georges in Paris, the prestigious dinner saw esteemed celebrities the likes of actors Sophie Marceau and Sonam Kapoor, alongside Victoria’s Secret model Jourdan Dunn wearing Chopard’s stunning creations.

Sonam Kapoor;Caroline Scheufele;Jourdan Dunn

(Left to right) Sonam Kapoor, Caroline Scheufele, Jourdan Dunn

Chopard’s precious jewels also made an appearance at The Art of Giving Love Ball at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris to raise funds for the Naked Heart Foundation, an initiative by supermodel Natalia Vodianova to raise funds for children with special needs. Graced by the powerful, such as Bernard Arnault, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of LVMH, the supermodel brandished her own power look, with a pair of dazzling drop earrings.

PARIS, FRANCE - JULY 06: Natalia Vodianova attends the "The Art of Giving" Love Ball Naked Heart foundation : Photo Call as part of Paris Fashion Week on July 6, 2016 in Paris, France. (Photo by Pierre Suu/Getty Images)

PARIS, FRANCE – JULY 06: Natalia Vodianova attends the “The Art of Giving” Love Ball Naked Heart foundation : Photo Call as part of Paris Fashion Week on July 6, 2016 in Paris, France. (Photo by Pierre Suu/Getty Images)

Le Roch Hotel & Spa Now Open

France welcomes another luxury hotel and spa to its stylish capital, with the opening of Le Roch Hotel & Spa earlier this week. Located on a prime plot of real estate, the 37-room hotel is just steps away from iconic Paris locations such as the Place Vendôme, the Opéra Garnier and the world famous art gallery: the Louvre.Le-Roch-hotel-and-spa-suite

The spanking new hotel is housed in a heritage structure in the 1st arrondissement that dates back to the 19th century, which adds to its charm where sophistication meets modern design. The talented individuals behind the interior of the hotel are none other than interior designer Sarah Lavoine and architect Vincent Bastie. With amenities such as a sun-lit courtyard, a library a restaurant and an exclusive spa, Le Roch is a slice of Parisian heaven.Le-Roch-hotel-and-Spa-bathroom

The aesthetics of the hotel reflect the vibe of the neighborhood, while boasting colors such as sage, chartreuse and milky green. Furniture and fixtures are anything but boring, proving that the designer has a keen eye for detail. From pieces designed by Lavoine herself and crafted by Cassina, to the Carrera marble, solid walnut wood flooring right down to the bathtubs and basins by Kaldewei, each element blends together to create a stylish living space.Le-Roch-hotel-and-spa-hammam-shower

If a spacious en-suite wasn’t enough, Le Roch provides a private hamman steam bath in each suite — perfect for resting those tired muscles after a day of travel. Complementing the bath are cosmetics from Codage that are specially commissioned for the hotel and spa. To be truly well rested and ready for the real world once again, the hotel provides guest with a 75-minute top-to-toe facial and body massage. To ensure that guests make the most of the signature in-house treatment, they are given a one-month supply of Codage’s ready-to-wear skincare line that combats jetlag and the effects of travel (Score!)Le-Roch-hotel-and-spa-dining-rooms

France being an international culinary hub means that the hotel has a restaurant steeped in world-class gastronomy. In the capable hands of chef Arnaud Faye, the restaurant provides guests with a menu that is anything but traditional French fare. Instead, the dishes use vegetables and botany for a truly gastronomic experience. While the meals are designed to be shared, we certainly wouldn’t complain about having a plate all to ourselves.

Le Roch Hotel & Spa – 28 rue Saint Roch, 75001 Paris