Tag Archives: Gucci

Harry Styles’ Gucci Campaign Redefines Classic Tailoring

Harry Styles, renowned English Singer, songwriter, actor, and synonym for boy band One Direction, is the face of Gucci’s tailoring campaign. After the disbanding of One Direction in 2016, the multi-hyphenate has transformed into a bona-fide star with hits from his personal album like “Sign of the Times” and “Sweet Creatures”, a distinctly edgier style setting him apart from mere one-note One Directioner.

Similar to his music career, Harry’s wardrobe has been less about people-pleasing and instead opting to push boundaries of dressing which run against the current trend of “American business casual” – that is to say, men have forgotten how to dress up, and in that sense, Styles returns much needed dandy style to men’s fashion lexicon, both on stage and off.

For some time, he has been the unofficial poster boy for Alessandro Michele’s designs as seen in his “Kiwi” music video. For a Brit, Styles possess natural flair for Italian fashion, and from his MTV, it appears he also happens to be perfectly suited for it, thus it makes natural sense for Gucci to take the association further with their Gucci Fall/Winter campaign 2019.

Gucci Fall/Winter Campaign 2019: The merits of a characterized suit

Shot by Glen Luchford and art directed by Christopher Simmonds, the highly-anticipated Gucci campaign, unveiled on 2nd June features Harry Styles modelling the House’s latest suiting designs by Alessandro Michele. Picture this, quintessentially Italian style in the most English of settings – a local fish and chip shop in North London starring alongside a group of dogs and pet chickens no less.

While the suits may look out of place in the casual setting of a fish-and-chips joint, key Gucci traits lie in the details transmit dandy-ish flair without coming across as foppish. Creative director Alessandro Michele gives otherwise classic tailoring an instant uplift with unabashedly 70s vibe via design elements like embroidered floral designs on the lapels on the Marseille jacket and the pop of print emblazoned above the blazer chest pocket or via added detail to the Prince of Wales inspired shawl.

The collection as seen on Harry was released at the Gucci Fall/ Winter 2019 show. The show was kicked off in a similar off-kilter aesthetic of the campaign with models stunning the runway with human heads and animals accessories; Alessandro Michele wish to acquaint the audience and invited members of press that “we can decide who we are”.

Michele’s deep thoughts were translated through the Fall/Winter campaign by challenging the definitions of what is normal or abnormal. From the rigidity of suits to creature accessories, the Gucci 2019 collection reminds us that the idea of personal identity should always be embraced, whether is it in the state of mind or in the choice of clothes.

Gucci – Louis Vuitton Competition to Heat Up with US$12 Billion Revenue Target

In February 2018, Bloomberg reported that Gucci had beat luxury competitor Hermes with a quarter of enthusiastic growth – 43% increase in sales; the resultant surge in revenue brought €6.2 billion to Gucci, outstripping Hermes International’s sales revenues of €5.5 billon by a cool billion euros. Revenue-wise, Gucci is on par with Chanel SA with faster growth to boot.

“Sooner or later, if you look at the different pace of growth, and I think our growth is going to be better, it’s not a question of if, but when.” – ” Gucci CEO Marco Bizzarri to Bloomberg on exceeding Hermes

Now, the Kering Group Italian fashion brand aims to achieve €10 billion (US$12 billion) revenues, placing it in the same area as its biggest and most similarly brand positioned rival, Louis Vuitton, currently the most recognised and most profitable name in luxury. How? Gucci intends to bring more manufacturing in-house, as much an artisanal approach as a strategic decision to have tighter control over production, logistics and distribution, thus keeping costs manageable as luxury brands ramp up efforts to meet increase demands with tighter internal processes.

Gucci v. Louis Vuitton Competition to Heat Up with US$12 Billion Revenue Target

Italian Gucci made announcement of their ambitions on Thursday for US$12 billion revenue targets following English Burberry and French Louis Vuitton’s own shareholder briefings to invest greater revenues into tightening internal business processes, thus better improving ‘time to market’ to cater to increased demand for luxury goods.

If Gucci successfully halves its current dependence on suppliers and meets its US$12 billion revenue targets, they could very well be on track to supplant reigning luxury king, Louis Vuitton as the world’s top luxury brand by sales.

According to Gucci CEO Bizzarri, the Italian luxury brand saw sales rise 49% in the first three months and it is showing no signs of abating. That said, Bizzari was cogniscient of the fact that Gucci fragrance and beauty items were doing “far below market”. However, Bizzari placed expectations for 2018 Gucci retail revenues to hit at least €9 billion, up from €7 billion achieved end 2017.

Gucci rocketed to record growth and sales levels following a makeover under the auspices of designer Alessandro Michele’s opulent and extravagant creations from painted bags, retro-futurist ensembles, crystal sunglasses and impactful accessories. Presently, 75% of leather goods production is provided by external suppliers which Gucci intends to reduce by close to half, thus doubling “time to market” or reaction time according to sales ebbs and flows. This “halving” corresponds with a double pace growth comparative to luxury market and Gucci has its sights set on €10 billion (US$12 billion) in annual revenue.

Business of Luxury: How will Gucci hopes to beat Louis Vuitton

E-Commerce remains the lynch pin of their strategy. In April 2018, it was reported that Gucci online sales more than doubled in the first quarter and Kering Group intends to triple online sales. In 2017, Gucci achieved €270 million from online sales alone. On the storefront, a third of Gucci’s boutiques have been updated to reflect Michele’s retro-flamboyant aesthetic, creating new nostalgic experiences, with plans to increase retail space 3% each year.

As if taking a leaf from Tomas Maier who departs sister brand Bottega, Alessandro Michele has been refocusing on brand heritage, opening a mixed use concept comprising shop, restaurant and museum showcasing Gucci’s 70s glory days. Dapper Dan, subject of a previous Gucci lawsuit for alleged bootlegging of their wares, was also made a partner and associate, re-opening the tailoring Atelier and re-igniting fervour capturing the streetwear zeitgeist or hautebeast.

Under Michele, Gucci has regained some of the fashion and cultural relevance it lost with the departure of designer Tom Ford. In Michele’s own words to Bloomberg, Gucci is to be “a definitive 21st century statement of contemporary coolness.”

No timeline was given for surpassing rival LVMH’s Louis Vuitton and as of publishing, Kering SA shares dipped slightly lower but was still generally on an upward trend following the group’s earlier first quarter announcement that Gucci had beaten Hermes. 

 

 

 

Gucci Unveils First Ever Concept Store In Soho, New York at Wooster Street

The house of Gucci is expanding its presence once again, unveiling its first store in Soho New York at 63 Wooster Street. Gucci’s new Soho New York shop follows their footprint established earlier this year with the establishment of Dapper Dan’s Atelier. The new Gucci Soho concept space harbours creativity and innovation inspired by the artistic district itself, built as the brand’s attempt to deviate from its traditional retail counterpart.

Gucci Unveils First Ever Concept Store In Soho, New York at Wooster Street

The vintage aspect of Gucci’s newest New York outpost stays loyal to the cast-iron architecture that characterizes Soho while the interior decorations pay tribute to creative director Alessandro Michele’s widely popular designs. The main change, however, is in the store operations. Gucci seeks to eliminate the cold undertones of its usual store by removing the security guards and the quiet sections for storing expensive jewellery. In its place is a cast of ambassadors trained to tell the Gucci story, thus, bridging the distance between the consumers and the brand. The new Soho store spans across nearly 10,000 square feet furnished with sofas for a homely touch to the original brickwork, wooden floors and tin ceiling. From Sneakers to dresses, the merchandise harmonizes democratically along with Alessandro Michele’s aesthetic for the store, promising to provide each customer with a unique shopping experience.

A nod to the house practice of blending traditional with modern, Gucci Wooster debuts a 3D display installation playing host to creatives and film screening, immersing customers to the realm of Gucci. With the steep growth of E-commerce sites like Net-a-Porter and Farfetch driving almost 85 percent of luxury sales last year, it is apparent that Michele is taking an experiential spin on this retail store to give customers a reason to shop in-store rather than shopping online. The challenge now is to keep up with this passion project.

Gucci’s introduction to “experiential” retail is no panacea. With many other brands experimenting with innovative store concepts, Chief Executive Marco Bizzarri hints that the only breakthrough would be to create meaningful moments with the customers, where customers are encouraged to handle merchandise freely and enjoy themselves, even if they are not buying anything.

Yoon joins Dior Homme: Proving Streetwear has overtaken Luxury

Ambush Designer Yoon Ahn Is Dior Homme’s New Jewelry Designer, tapped upon by Kim Jones after Kris Van Assche took a Creative role at Berluti.

Ambush Designer Yoon Ahn Is Dior Homme’s New Jewelry Designer, tapped upon by Kim Jones after Kris Van Assche took a Creative role at Berluti.

Founded by designer Yoon Ahn and her husband, AMBUSH began as hip hop inspired streetwear jewellery label known for its youthful vibrancy and rawness; Now, Yoon has been tapped by LVMH Group to head Dior Homme jewellery as the brand’s latest hautebeast designer, an announcement which follows hot on the heels of LVMH group sister brand’s appointment of Virgil Abloh as new Artistic Director for Louis Vuitton menswear.

Yoon joins Dior Homme: Proving Streetwear has overtaken Luxury

Like Abloh, the founder and designer haute streetwear label AMBUSH, beginning only with streetwear accessories and jewellery before later becoming a unisex ready-to-wear brand, yet another case-in-point for LVMH group’s embrace for hypebeast, a genre which has been a major source of disruption for the luxury industry.

1st day of work as a jewelry designer. Team @mrkimjones @Diorhomme 💪🏽‼️

A post shared by YOON (@yoon_ambush) on

Ambush Designer Yoon Ahn Is Dior Homme’s New Jewelry Designer, tapped upon by Kim Jones after Kris Van Assche took a Creative role at Berluti. Ahn, a street style icon, naturally togged in mixed up AMBUSH ensembles, in her own right, will utilise her core skills as Dior Homme’s new jewellery designer. It’s no surprise that Kim Jones sought Yoon Ahn for the role, the two had collaborated back in 2012 when Jones was lead Creative at Louis Vuitton, working with AMBUSH to create “playbutton” essentially a wearable MP3 accessory.

Presently, up to 85% of the luxury market’s new growth is driven by a generation of Ys, Zs and millennials with Bain consulting predicting that by 2025, this generation of youthful shoppers will account for 45% of global luxury spend. This may not represent the majority  but it is an influential segment given how rapidly the millennial generation is influencing consumer purchase decision making in generations beyond their own. Not only are brands specifically catering marketing communications and campaigns for them but they are also shaping consumer perceptions on what brands are cool and en vogue. 

Dapper Dan front row at Gucci RTW Spring 2018 show. Streetwear is now mainstream and the hautebeast phenomena is best exemplified by the commercial alliance between former frenemies - Gucci and Dapper Dan.

Dapper Dan front row at Gucci RTW Spring 2018 show. Streetwear is now mainstream and the hautebeast phenomena is best exemplified by the commercial alliance between former frenemies – Gucci and Dapper Dan.

As it stands, millennials consider traditional luxury brands to be “establishment” and stuffy and it has been a trans-generational perception shift which has seen brands like Louis Vuitton – Supreme make big wins and competitor brand’s like Kering Group’s Balenciaga and Gucci take market leader positions in the nascent (if not already peak) hautebeast genre of luxury designer goods.

Business of Luxury: The mainstreaming of Hype and LVMH’s response to market disruption

Streetwear is now mainstream and the hautebeast phenomena is best exemplified by the commercial alliance between former frenemies – Gucci and Dapper Dan. Once litigants in a lawsuit over Dapper Dan’s flagrant co-option of Gucci motifs into modified windbreakers and trackpants, 2017 was the year that Gucci made tacit endorsement of Dapper Dan’s preternatural zeitgeist cool and as of early 2018, Alessandro Michele made the endorsement real with the re-opening of Dapper Dan’s Harlem atelier, the tailoring shop which initially closed due to legal action, 25 years later.

Meanwhile Kering Group sister brand Balenciaga has been paving the way into the hearts of hypebaes with their early break from traditional luxury design – first with products of cultural snark – the appropriation of the East Asian “Wholesale Market Shopping bag” and then later with a high fashion interpretation of the ubiquitous IKEA shopping bag. Reflecting a streetwear-hautebeast approach, it is little wonder that Balenciaga’s top-selling products are its Triple S and Speed sneakers.

Balenciaga introduces snark on the level of Abloh's "Little Black Dress" with a high fashion interpretation of the ubiquitous IKEA shopping bag.

Balenciaga introduces snark on the level of Abloh’s “Little Black Dress” with a high fashion interpretation of the ubiquitous IKEA shopping bag.

Balenciaga’s top-selling Triple S sneakers - total hautebeast and "aged" like one.

Balenciaga’s top-selling Triple S sneakers – total hautebeast and “aged” like one.

Kim Jones has lots of street cred and with his bet of putting Louis Vuitton and Supreme together paying off big time, it is easy to see why arch-rival LVMH is looking to cued-in, street credible designers like Abloh and now, Yoon Ahn to deliver street-smart drops and fashionably relevant productions.

That said, fashion appeal isn’t the only thing encouraging streetwear’s takeover of luxury. The marketing cycle is vastly different today than it was 10 years ago. Attention is fleeting with the wide array of social media platforms and rather than conform to the traditional spring-summer, autmn-winter fashion cycles, streetwear has dominated attention with the highly viral “blink and you’ll miss me” concept of fashion “drops” – targeted releases of new products that spawn all year around, delivering timed intervals of “hype”, like a drug, disseminated by What’s App screenshots, instagram and facebook. The speed of digital media is not only changing how we shop but how the more clued-in brands are dominating the news and attention cycle with well-timed releases and hype-worthy product collaborations.

Yoon Ahn as Dior Homme jewellery designer hints to a large overhaul of LVMH Group's strategy towards menswear

Yoon Ahn as Dior Homme jewellery designer hints to a large overhaul of LVMH Group’s strategy towards menswear

 

That said, while hypebeast is in full-swing as LVMH, the world’s largest luxury conglomerate populates ranks of designers and creative heads with street-savvy streetwear designers, there’s the inevitable over-correction where hautebeast eventually becomes yet another fashion establishment trend and millennials depart in droves for the next “authentic expression” of self.

As it stands, Abloh as Louis Vuitton men’s Artistic Director, Jones as Dior Homme creative head and now Yoon Ahn as Dior Homme jewellery designer hints to a large overhaul of LVMH Group’s strategy towards menswear, it remains to be seen if the women’s side will be equally impacted. Considering the success of rival Gucci’s embroidered bee sneakers (a revival motif), it will not be surprising if LVMH already has plans in motion for women’s wear in its stable of brands.

Yoon Ahn’s jewellery for Dior Homme will accompany Jones’s debut collection at the Spring 2019 menswear shows in Paris in June.

Luxury Fashion Brands to Showcase 2019 Cruise Collection

This year the major fashion brands have organised to stage their 2019 Cruise shows in breathtaking scenes all over the globe. From Arles to the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II and Saint-Paul-de-Vence, the month of May will be a whirlwind of spectacular activities to present traditional mid-season collections from Prada, Gucci and Louis Vuitton to name a few. Here’s a quick rundown of the venues and the dates chosen for the 2019 Cruise shows.

Major Fashion Brands on Transatlantic Tour to Showcase 2019 Cruise Collection

1| Gucci in Arles

Helmed by Gucci Creative director, Alessandro Michele who is apt in translating fashion in a playground that is more about the contemporary population, the past years saw the Italian fashion house staging its fashion shows at Westminster Abbey (2016) and the Palatine Gallery of the Palazzo Pitti in Florence (2017). This year, the show is most likely to be once again dominated by historic references, as Gucci has chosen the Alyscamps in Arles, a Roman era necropolis as the venue to present its 2019 Cruise collection. Held on May 30, the show will no doubt be spectacular, spectacular!

www.gucci.com

2| Louis Vuitton in Saint-Paul-de-Vence

The Maison Louis Vuitton has made a few big moves this quarter one of the year, including the recent appointment of Virgil Abloh as its new men’s Artistic Director and also launched the latest advertising campaign “The Spirit of Travel”, descending into the Californian desert with actress Emma Stone and photographed by Craig McDean. Last year, the brand presented a collection that blended nature and art with an urban spirit in Miho Museum, near Kyoto, Japan. For the 2019 Cruise collection, Louis Vuitton has chosen the charming medieval town of Saint-Paul-de-Vence in southern France to stage the show, which will take place on May 28 at the Maeght Foundation, a modern art gallery on a hill overlooking the town. Another exciting journey for the French fashion label.

https://eu.louisvuitton.com

3| Prada in New York

Headed to the Big Apple for its 2019 Cruise Collection, the Italian fashion house will reveal the precise location at a later date. Meantime, Prada is the only major brand to take the presentation of its mid-season collection outside of France. The show, being in the pipeline for May 4, will most likely be held in a spectacular venue. Last year, Prada chose the Osservatorio exhibition space in the historic setting of the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan.

www.prada.com

4| The House of Dior

Last year, the French fashion label Dior put up a magnificent showcase in the Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve located in California. To prep for the brand’s 2019 Cruise collection, the Maison has yet to reveal the location to conduct its next photo shoot. Currently helmed by Artistic Director Maria Grazia Chiuri, will Dior opt for a location in France, or will it take its Cruise collection to a far-fetch destination? We will find out soon!

www.dior.com

Business of Luxury: Gucci takes a Stand with March For Our Lives

Staying silent is going out of style. In fact, it’s been en trende to speak up since President Trump took office on 20 January 2017. As a general rule of thumb, brands don’t typically make political statements. According to the Digital Branding Institute: activist consumers take victories not won during elections and vent them in the marketplace. During the 2016 US Presidential Elections, dozens of companies were singled out for boycotts for their ties or support of President Donald Trump including Nordstrom, Amazon and MillerCoors.

“57% of consumers are more likely to buy from or boycott a brand because of its stance on a social or political issue.” – Edelman

Macy’s bears special mention. It has been attacked from both sides – first for selling Trump’s merchandise and then again for pulling Ivanka Trump’s collection. Statistically speaking, PR firm Edelman discovered that: “57% of consumers are more likely to buy from or boycott a brand because of its stance on a social or political issue.” From a commercial standpoint, brands and companies take an immense revenue risk taking a stand and offending both ends of the political spectrum – from doing too little to doing too much. Yet, all this is changing, in an industry which doesn’t take stands, Gucci takes a stand with March For Our Lives.

In an Industry which doesn’t take stands, Gucci takes a Stand with March for Our Lives

 

For September 2016 and June 2017 Fashion Weeks, everything from generalist common sense statements like Prabal Gurung tees with phrases like “Girls Just Want to Have Fundamental Rights,” to more pointed, literal statements like New York–based fashion label R13’s “Fuck Trump” have added to the cacophony of activist voices. That said, the big fashion brands, those owned by luxury conglomerates and therefore answerable to shareholders and share prices, don’t typically make political statements to avoid alienating potential consumers who have a wide range of beliefs and opinions.

“We stand with March For Our Lives and the fearless students across the country who demand that their lives and safety become a priority. We have all been directly or indirectly impacted by these senseless tragedies, and Gucci is proud to join this movement with a donation of $500,000.” – Gucci

On 14 February 2017, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School fell victim to another mass shooting. Seven days later, Gucci joined the movement for gun control, pledging $500,000 to the March For Our Lives rally. According to a statement from Gucci, “We stand with March For Our Lives and the fearless students across the country who demand that their lives and safety become a priority. We have all been directly or indirectly impacted by these senseless tragedies, and Gucci is proud to join this movement with a donation of $500,000.”

While it is easy to be cynical and consider the half a million dollars donation to March For Our Lives as nothing but a PR stunt, Gucci is actually taking a fairly large risk given the massive support (if only from a vocal minority) the NRA enjoys and the tremendous funding it can deploy for attack ads. Nevertheless, Gucci is doing more than riding a wave of resurgent anti-gun momentum, the company actually has first hand experience with mass shootngs.

In June 2016, a Gucci manager was among the 49 dead at a Florida nightclub when a gunman unloaded near point blank range at the clubbers. Gucci, among the earliest of high profile fashion labels to take a stand, reflects a new normal for corporate governance where it’s no longer about taking a stand against a globally respected issue. The new reality is, as Trump as shown, it is slightly more risky now to take a stand than it is to stay quiet.

 

Business of Luxury: Market Dynamics involving Millennials and their social/moral values

According to a study by The Economist, a rising number of millennials and their correlated spending power, is slowly encouraging brands to embrace the social and moral values which align with theirs. This means that increasingly, brands have little choice but to address sociopolitical issues like sustainability, right to choose and even yes, right to live (even if that clashes with gun rights). According to the daa, 79% of millennials  prefer to purchase products from a company that operates with a social purpose; a similar majority also prefers to be associated with a company operating with such a social purpose. Leveraging upon social media, this “millennial influence” itself translates into a type of soft power,

“I am truly moved by the courage of these students. My love is with them and it will be next to them on March 24. I am standing with March For Our Lives and the strong young women and men across the United States who are fighting for their generation and those to come.” – Alessandro Michele, Gucci creative director

At the top, a new generation of Chief Executives too lead companies with less hierarchical fervour and more importantly, 73% of them believe consumers are increasingly judging companies on the humanness of their corporate character, thus there’s growing pressure, both from their own increasinging liberal values and economic concerns, that they use their positions to give back to society – if that means Gucci donates $500,000 to March For Our Lives, certainly there’s no better cause than something which has only benefited from “thoughts and prayers” thus far. That said, some industry insiders LUXUO spoke with were less optimistic.

“Gucci is currently favoured by LGBT groups. They themselves are a marginalised segment of society, the brand will not lose any fans over an anti-gun stance. They have everything to gain” – Industry Insider

In a 2014 study by Wolf & Cohne, it was discovered that the top three wish for consumers was that their brands “acted with integrity at all times”. In 2016, a KPMG study of consumer attitudes found that the majority of consumers preferred that their brands resonated with social values similar to their own. Finally, a recent 2017 Cone Communications CSR Study examining consumer attitudes, perceptions and behaviors around corporate social responsibility, showed that companies today need to stand up for social injustices.

“The events over the past year have ignited a groundswell of activism on very divisive topics and Americans are questioning future progress. They are looking to companies to drive change on the issues they hold dear. Now, consumers are no longer just asking, ‘What do you stand for,’ but also, ‘What do you stand up for?”” – Alison DaSilva, Executive VP of CSR Strategy, Cone Communications.

As social media continues to polarise society at an increasing pace, brands can no longer stay neutral. Consumers are taking sides and for many of them, particularly millennials, falling on the right side of history implies that it is no longer acceptable for companies to claim ignorance or non interference on issues which have a clear and unambiguous right side and wrong side. As power shifts increasingly to the corporations and governments appear to be falling its citizens (an article for another time and publication), we now live in an era where brands can no longer afford to stand by the sidelines.

 

Gucci SS18: Get Lit

Gucci SS18: Get Lit

Alessandro Michelle’s maximalist empire is replete with cultural and art references, forming (pseudo) intellectual conversations on his clothing and accessories. His Spring/Summer 2018 collection opens a chapter in dissension, quoting “creation as an act of resistance” to galvanise people to live beyond the banalities of daily life.

One revolutionary idea is that of recreational reading in the digital age, expressed through leather document bags that fan out at the base like your favourite book (just kidding, we know you don’t have one).

The jazzy blue version is literally dressed up like a novel, with the titular “Maison de Campagne d’Horace” (“Horace’s Villa”) on the spine and author (Bertrand) Capmartin de Chaupy on the front flap. (If you don’t already know, “Horace’s Villa” is about Capmartin de Chaupy’s quest to find the Roman poet’s summer house in the Sabine hills. Fascinating stuff.)

Those who subscribe to anti-intellectualism can opt for the the nonsense word “Guccy” in retro Sega font. Both portfolios come with a key that locks the bag, which can be detached and worn as a necklace with a medieval charm.

Words by Belda Chung

Standout Looks From New York Fashion Week 2018

Throwback: Standout Looks From The Streets Of New York Fashion Week 2018

The biggest glitz and glamour fest of the year, the New York Fashion Week (NYFW), came to a successful close after the city’s streets turned into a stunning, temporary catwalk to showcase fashionable gents decked in chic-stylish menswear in the most outstanding way possible. While inspirations are diverse, here are some of the takeaways from the NYFW. With shows from Gucci, Burberry, Calvin Klein, Tod’s and Off-White, to name a few, the fashion labels are out to present their statement-making outfits with contemporary flair, bold hues, colours, prints, checkered patterns and other fashionable materials. Here, we hope to help you transition your wardrobe and inspire in you a more savvy-dressing where you can keep your looks fresh and effortlessly stylish all year round.

Slim-Fit

 

Leather

Over-sized Printed Cotton Wear

Over Coat

Trench Coat

(Source: Mr Porter)

Mens Fashion Trends: After hours

The notion of masculinity no longer revolves around the traditional stereotypes — tall, strong and dominant — but a fluid concept. We explore the codes of virility in the innermost setting — the bedroom.

CK Calvin Klein Cotton T-shirt, leather jacket;
Emporio Armani Cotton pants;
Calvin Klein Underwear Cotton trunks

Emporio Armani Satin jacket;
Gucci Leather bag

Dior Homme Cotton shirt, cotton vest, leather boots;
CK Calvin Klein Cotton pants

Ermenegildo Zegna Couture Cotton blazer;
Dolce & Gabbana Cotton pants;
Gucci Sterling silver beaded necklace;
Valentino Wool scarf

CK Calvin Klein Cotton jacket, cotton T-shirt, cotton pants;
Bottega Veneta Silk scarf as belt

Dolce & Gabbana Satin shirt;
Valentino Wool belt;
Diesel Denim jeans

 

Photography Joel Low | Art Direction Jeremy Ang | Styling Yong Wei Jian & Belda Chung

Gucci opens Gucci Garden in Florence

Italian luxury fashion brand, Gucci has just opened Gucci Garden inside the historic Palazzo della Mercanzia in Florence’s Piazza della Signoria on January 9, 2018 along with three-Michelin-star chef Massimo Bottura’s newest restaurant at the long-awaited Gucci Garden museum. Conceived by Creative Director Alessandro Michele, The Gucci Garden also consist of one-of-a-kind items and exhibition spaces curated by the critic and curator Maria Luisa Frisa.

Gucci Garden Boutique

Gucci has conceptualised the conventional museum with roots dating back to 1337 and reimagined it as a living, collaborative and creative space to express the Maison’s evolving aesthetic and philosophy.

Designed by Gucci Creative Director Alessandro Michele, the name Gucci Garden is chosen to front the fashion boutique as Gucci has always been very much into the exploration of the eclectic creativity and as part of what gives a metaphysical meaning to the natural world of plants, flowers and animals. These motifs have been part of the Gucci narrative since its inception.

“The garden is real, but it belongs above all to the mind, populated with plants and animals: like the snake, which slips in everywhere, and in a sense, symbolises a perpetual beginning and a perpetual return.” – Alessandro Michele, Creative Director of The Gucci Garden

The house curated an array of fashion pieces from collections dating back to the House’s Florentine origins in 1921, and to celebrate its rich archive, The Gucci Garden captured the general trend from the recent work, memorabilia, ephemera and contemporary art, to bring about a more lively and interactive experience for visitors.

Gucci Garden Galleria Rooms

Over at the Gucci Garden Galleria Rooms, the exhibits span over two floors; instead of housing a permanent collection of historic pieces, the Gucci Garden presents clothing, accessories, video installations, artworks, documents and artefacts organised by themes that tells the story of the House by blending the past with present.

Artists such as Jayde Fish, Trevor Andrew (AKA GucciGhost) and Coco Capitán have been invited to decorate the walls, and their works sit alongside Gucci fabric patterned wallpaper and a giant nineteenth-century equestrian oil portrait, Fantino con bambina, by Domenico Induno.

On the ground floor of Gucci Garden, the space is helmed by Massimo Bottura where visitors can head down to the restaurant and tuck into delectable dishes after perusing the exhibits.

There’s also a bazaar-like retail space offering one-of-a-kind products and packaging that are exclusive to this store, including shoes and bags in special materials, brocade skirts and coats, other unique pieces such as silk bomber jackets that feature the Gucci Garden Gothic script, are not on sale in any other Gucci stores.

Also, visitors to the city of Florence can luxuriate at the Gucci Garden and revel in the House’s history of lovely hand-work and craftsmanship as well as the artisanship that echoes the palazzo’s mercantile origins.

Entrance to the Gucci Garden Galleria is €8 (approximately S$13), half of which will go towards helping restoration projects in Florence. 

Gucci’s Spring/Summer 2018 Ad Campaign

Gucci’s Spring/Summer 2018 Advertising Campaign

Commissioned by Gucci to helm the brand’s Spring/Summer 2018 advertising campaign, Spanish artist and illustrator, Ignasi Monreal, has created a striking batch of imagery with a focus on fantastical characters and landscape designs, stemmed from his imagination that evokes a ‘Utopian Fantasy’.

The Gucci Spring Summer 2018 advertising campaign will roll out as of January 2018 and the ‘Utopian Fantasy’ artworks invite viewers to enter the dream-like world and view the artist’s paintings through a surreal and heightened sensual lens.

View the range of Gucci’s new products, featuring the iconic double G logo, modern motifs on the tracksuits, graphic crewneck sweatshirts, and many more.

For more information about Gucci and its newest collection, please visit www.gucci.com.

Chef Massimo Bottura to open restaurant at Gucci Garden in 2018

Three Michelin stars, Chef Massimo Bottura

The House will debut the Gucci Garden on January 10 in the historic Palazzo della Mercanzia. Designed by critic Maria Luisa Frisa, who has also worked with Diana Vreeland and Raf Simons, the newly designed space will have a new restaurant helmed by Three Michelin stars, Chef Massimo Bottura, a boutique offering one-off fashionable designer pieces, and exhibition rooms curated by critic and curator Maria Luisa Frisa.

The overall space is being overseen by Gucci’s creative director Alessandro Michele. After a fantastic makeover, Bottura’s partnership with Gucci will take his exciting business venture to a whole new level. Other than being crowned as one of the world’s best Chefs, Bottura’s Modena restaurant Osteria Francescana is currently ranked second in the influential World’s 50 Best restaurants list in 2016.

Although details on the renovation of the new restaurant itself is still sparse for now, once the Modena restaurant Osteria Francescana is ready, the dining space is set to offer visitors a comfortable place to indulge and rest their stiletto-heeled feet after browsing the exhibits and making their big-ticket purchases.

As for Bottura, this collaboration with Gucci will mark a stark departure for him from the soup kitchens he ran through his non-profit group Food for Soul, which turned edible, surplus food waste from local grocery stores into meals for the homeless.

Stellar Third Quarter 2017 Profits at Kering Group with 28.4% Rise in Revenue

 

On Wednesday 26 April 2017, Kering Group shares hit a record high after the French Luxury house posted record performance for the first quarter of the year. According to The Street, the owner of Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent posted earnings of of €3.57 billion on the back of double-digit growth. At the time, Kering Group’s performance was emblematic of a wider recovery in the luxury leather category which also saw French rival LVMH posting stellar revenues.

In 23 June 2017, Kering’s own Yves Saint Laurent announced a lofty goal of seeking almost double sales growth by 2020 by opening 20 stores a year over the next three years and ramping up in-house production within a similar timeframe. Needless to say, Kering Group’s excellent performance comes on the back the newly revamped Gucci which itself posted better than expected first half earnings for 2017, growing 7.4% with revenues of €1.947 billion with Alessandro Michele as its newly invigorated creative director.

Stellar Profits at Kering Group with 28.4% Rise in Revenue

According to Business of Fashion, growing demand for Gucci’s accessories helped French luxury group exceed sales forecasts in the third quarter of 2017, netting Kering Group stellar profits with 28.4% rise in revenue.

Kering Group, the owner of brands like Bottega Veneta, Yves Saint Laurent, Stella McCartney and Alexander McQueen had reported first-half 2017 operating profit of €811.1 million, exceeding the projected €796 million by Bloomberg. This third quarter performance which sees the owner of  Balenciaga and Gucci achieve 28.4% rise (beating the projected 20% growth rate) after accounting for FOREX and acquisitions.

Few analysts consider that the August agreement to ‘Cooperate In Protection of Intellectual Property and Joint Enforcement” with Alibaba Group could have played a part in this growth. The agreement represented joint investment and cooperative efforts to protect brands’ intellectual property rights and crack down on piracy, however experts say, pirates likely never had the income to buy original luxury goods in the first place and so do not represent a significant revenue stream.

Business of Luxury: Why is Kering Group exceeding expectations?

Just last month, Goldman Sachs analysts predicted that the French luxury group will post growth of more than 10% due to the Gucci overhaul with Goldman Sachs analyst Richard Edwards, Jamie Bajwa and Natasha de la Grense citing Alessandro Michele’s appointment and recent repositioning as fundamentals for sales acceleration and growth and they have been proven right. The Italian brand Gucci has been Kering’s biggest revenue generator and home to the trendiest collection of the last two years – Michele’s sequin dressed collection.

Sales at Gucci were up 49.4%t in the third quarter 2017 thanks to the younger, re-energised creative direction incubating in a new breed of Gucci fans in the millennial segment which currently account for more than half of the brand’s clients. Furthermore, Gucci has thriving eCommerce with third quarter of 2016 seeing a 17% sales boost, 50% of that growth being the  result of its eCommerce efforts. In July 2017, JingDaily also reported that Gucci launched a revamped eCommerce store allowing shoppers in China access to purchase its full range of fashion, handbags, accessories, and jewellery with localised forms of payment like Alipay and WeChat. This allowed Gucci to expand sales by more than 100 percent in the third quarter.

Meanwhile, Gucci has been leveraging WeChat’s online-to-offline capabilities to grow its following, learn more about its customers and even allowing them to reserve a tour of the brand’s Blind for Love exhibition through the chat platform. Overall, the digital strategy in China appears to have paid off with the  #blindforlove hashtag on WeChat and twitter clone Weibo gaining over 9.5 million views.

The exuberance in China is not only compensating but outright overcoming the laggard sales resulting from the stronger Euro which dissuades tourist shopping in the zone. In terms of 2016 revenue figures, the group achieved revenues of US$3.5 billion. In terms of 2017, Kering Group has already achieved US$4.59 billion in the third quarter, representing a growth 23.3%.

Luxury Kidswear: The Next Big Market for Luxury

Gucci Kids SS 2017

In this current retail climate, luxury brands are downsizing. That is to say, they’re creating kid versions of their adult lines, catering to an ever younger market through luxury kidswear. Thanks to millennials and the growing number of celebrity couples churning out million dollar babies, the resulting social media frenzy from the Beckhams, Wests and Jolie-Pitts have changed the conversation from one of discovering new mediums for consumer engagement to now appealing to an entirely different class of consumer – the kids, through the most emotionally compromised shoppers on the planet, their parents.

Business of Luxury: Childrenswear, The Next Big Luxury Market

When popular English footballer David Beckham arrived at JFK airport in New York City in 2014, little was said about him, many of the reports were focused on his young daughter Harper and her chic hat and peacoat ensemble.

From Kingston and Zuma Rossdale (Gwen Stefani’s kids), to the scions of English Royalty: Prince George (UK Kidfluencer Prime according Forbes no less) and Princess Charlotte, fashion influencer clout is no longer wielded by over-exposed parents like Kim Kardashian but rather their celebrity offspring: North West, Suri Cruise and the like.

Left: Harper Beckham arriving at JFK with father, David. Right: Kingston Rossdale, son of Gwen Stefani

Their innocence, wrapped in a trapping of luxury, style and sometimes, attitude contributes to the appeal of whatever ensemble they happen to be rocking at the moment and luxury brands are only just beginning to entertain the idea of luxury kidswear, especially in developing economies like India, China, Indonesia and Singapore.

Luxury Brands taking Baby Steps

According to The Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India, the luxury kidswear market in India is growing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 20%, hitting 95,000 crore or US$14 billion in 2016, making India one of the fast growing markets for the luxury kidswear segment.

All aboard the luxury childrenswear train. Image: Gucci Kids A/W 2017

Similarly, the luxury kidswear genre is also growing in China, fuelled by twin phenomena – the now defunct one child policy, which led to parents indulging in lavish gifts for their progeny as well as the issue of that of fu er dai – a Chinese term which literally refers to the second generation wealthy, millennials used to growing in such opulent lifestyles that the children they sire, also lead similar lifestyles and a propensity towards luxury. These are trends which statistics from the China Research Centre for Children’s Industry also reflect where the projected baby boom through till 2021 will see the mainland’s under-16 population grow over 400 million. In the Asia-Pacific region, luxury kidswear is expected to grow at a pace of 5.3% per annum in Thailand, Indonesia and Singapore as well.

The phenomena of burgeoning luxury sales in the children’s segment is reflected not just in the numbers but in media as well. According to Business of Fashion, Hypebeast, an industry pioneer in online luxury streetwear commentary launched Hypekids in March 2017, a new children’s vertical when Founder Kevin Ma, saw big data trends in his Hypebeast audience growing up and having kids.

“I think it’s a natural progression for us,” – Kevin Ma, Founder, Hypebeast

Launching with Kids Foot Locker as a sponsor, Hypekids will include style news and features on designers with their kids, as well as sell children’s items on Hypebeast’s global e-commerce platform, HBX. The site further posits that millennial parents — who are dressing their children in the same clothes as they dress themselves — are the driving force of the industry.

Balmain Kids

Additionally, rising purchasing power serves as another driver growth in the luxury kidswear segment and the market for designer childrenswear has also been spurred by increasing brand consciousness and the proliferation of online digital platforms which not only grow interest for ensembles for million dollar babies but also serve as a kind of new status symbol – you are no longer judged by what you wear but also what your kids wear, that aside, the reality is that while many millennials aren’t too fussy with what they wear, they certainly are cognisant of the fact that their children are growing up in cultural environs vastly different from that for their era.

 The Business of Luxury Kidswear

In 2013, the first Global Kids Fashion Week launched in London to mixed reception but even with social criticism, the genre continued to grow, encouraged by Burberry, an early adopter, selling $91 million in luxury kidswear in 2014, encouraging the entry of major luxury brands into the arena of childrenswear: Gucci, Armani, Fendi and recently Karl Lagerfeld in 2016 (UPDATE: Givenchy has just launched their kids line) have each launched clothing and accessories lines targeted specifically at children. Given that high street apparel brands like Zara, H&M and Marks & Spencer had found lucrative business in the childrenswear genre, it was only a matter of time before the bigwigs caught on.

Marc Jacobs Kids, officially – Little Marc Jacobs 2014

Gucci Kids 2017

According to Singapore Tatler, The Shoppes at Marina Bay Sands Singapore was leading the charge in children’s luxury retail, opening a slew of standalone boutiques in 2014 –  Baby Dior, Fendi Kids and Ralph Lauren Children; and then adding to their portfolio of luxury children’s stores: Dolce & Gabbana Junior and Armani Junior in 2015-16.

“In today’s environment of exclusivity and quality, the retail experiences that the market is catering for adults and children are on par, this can be seen in numerous aspects, from the calibre of designs released by renowned fashion houses, to the extensive selection of apparel, right down to the VIP treatment.” – John Postle, vice president of retail at Marina Bay Sands to Singapore Tatler

In China alone, as many as 90% of kidswear labels have their own standalone boutiques but the rise of e-commerce is threatening to move this major market online: Net-a-Porter, a trailblazer in luxury eCommerce, registered the Petite-a-Porter domain name in 2013 (Though nothing has been launched at the moment).  Currently, former Vogue editors Sylvana Ward Durrett and Luisana Mendoza, have themselves launched Maisonette, a Farfetch-style platform that sells a curated selection from children’s boutiques.

Oscar de la Renta kids 2017

That said, while luxury childrenswear is booming, it isn’t exactly a new segment. In the early 70s, Dior and Ralph Lauren were pioneers to the kidswear genre but it must be said, they were likely too early as a nearly four decade drought persisted until Burberry, Chloe and Marc Jacobs reignited the furore. They were followed by Stella McCartney, Lanvin, Marni and Gucci, the latter being the most aggressive (by definition of campaign marketing). Even Oscar de la Renta is in on this, there’s no doubt that every self-respecting designer needs to have a children’s collection under the auspices of their brand. Surely a decisive strategy of building brand loyalty early and deepening their relationships with existing customers.

Currently, European and North American markets account for a major slice of the global kidswear market.  According to Euromonitor, 2015 sales for luxury kidswear reached $135.6bn worldwide and accounted for 12% of the overall clothing market, Meanwhile, research firm NPD Group Inc expects the luxury childrenswear market to hit US$ 173.6 billion by 2017 at CAGR of 4.2% driven by aggressive growth developing economies, particularly India and China where a healthy and growing middle class as well as targeted marketing by brands, increasing social media engagement and a spurt of international travel has created a cocktail of elements driving on luxury childrenswear consumption.

Will luxury watch brands follow suit? Image: Romain Jerome Hello Kitty

That said, rising labour costs do not bode well to the two largest consumers of luxury childrenswear as more and more luxury labels are forced to maintain margins by heading to Bangladesh where Zara, Massimo Dutti, Marks & Spencer, G-Star Raw and H&M are already present. Still, markets like Thailand and Taiwan are largely untapped and growth potential is immense and more importantly, imminently renewable as parents will attest to how quickly the little tykes outgrow their outfits.

 

Classic Men’s Style and the New Rules of Classic Elegance

if you haven’t yet noticed, it’s quite apparent that most men don’t dress like this anymore

It is my sad duty to inform you that other than on Suits, it’s obvious that classic men’s style is on the verge of extinction (an article to follow soon on this statement which sounds suspiciously like hyperbole but isn’t); that said, if you haven’t yet noticed, it’s quite apparent that most men don’t dress like this anymore. Officially, the barometer for classic men’s style points towards trends where the trending personal style radar tilts past the devil-may-care insouciance of classic Italian sprezzatura to a level of street style more appropriate described in street nomenclature of DGAF, translated: “Don’t Give A Fuck” style. From T-shirts with ties to loud prints, the old rules have been bent if not broken, but there are new rules of classic elegance which still allow a classic gentleman to endure and thrive a new era of style and dressing. Remember this maxim: Good quality and great taste will always survive tests of time (and trends).

Classic Men’s Style and the New Rules of Classic Elegance

It used to be that every gentleman followed a sartorial template of classic men’s style with room for singular flourishes (a pocket square folded differently or puffed forgetfully), a boutonniere here and there – it was as John William’s Star Wars symphony with recognisable leitmotifs and the familiar comfort of string’s of the Jedi’s theme or Yoda’s motif. Today, style is less Williams and more Hans Zimmer’s Dark Knight, jarring, discordant, rough but with oases of Batman’s theme – a point of sole familial comfort in otherwise attention dominating electro-string compositions. Men’s style today is less about fitting in and more about peacocking (without appearing to be).

Classic Men's Style and the New Rules of Classic Elegance - The Gucci Heritage jacquard suit from Gucci pre-fall 2017 is not quite your stuffy old suit but with traditional, tightly packed motifs, it bears a tonal quality approaching what one might wear classically 'cept that it's not. I'd advise on a different pair of shoes though

Classic Men’s Style and the New Rules of Classic Elegance – The Gucci Heritage jacquard suit from Gucci pre-fall 2017 is not quite your stuffy old suit but with traditional, tightly packed motifs, it bears a tonal quality approaching what one might wear classically ‘cept that it’s not. I’d advise on a different pair of shoes though

My recommendation? The Gucci Queercore brogue monk shoe: A double-strap monk style shoe mixes traditional brogue details with a punk aesthetic. Rounded studs and metal feline head embellish the front.

My recommendation? The Gucci Queercore brogue monk shoe: A double-strap monk style shoe mixes traditional brogue details with a punk aesthetic. Rounded studs and metal feline head embellish the front.

Men’s Style: The Balanced Look (punctuated with whimsical accessories)

Because you’re throwing down good money for men’s garments, the financial hawks that we are would prefer that you put money down on “investment grade” trend-proof pieces that would stand the test of time; to ease your transition (and gradual acceptance) into these new rules of elegance, we highly recommend Alessandro Michele’s Gucci Cruise 2017 collection – an eclectic but still very much English inspired collection of bags, accessories and suits but steroid enhanced in terms of colourways and motifs.

 

New rules of classic elegance dictate that one can get experimental with textures and colours without going the "full Ronald McDonald" - Here, Bally cotton jacket with wool sweater, cotton pants, leather belt and canvas sneakers - coincidentally, this is also a smart casual look

New rules of classic elegance dictate that one can get experimental with textures and colours without going the “full Ronald McDonald” – Here, Bally cotton jacket with wool sweater, cotton pants, leather belt and canvas sneakers – coincidentally, this is also a smart casual look

Playing with colour also means that that striking or even pastel colours transposed on masculine cut garments like this peacoat from Hermes serve to accentuate a classic gents bravado in the rainbow realm

Playing with colour also means that that striking or even pastel colours transposed on masculine cut garments like this peacoat from Hermes serve to accentuate a classic gents bravado in the rainbow realm

With the new rules of classic elegance, it might be time to re-look your travel accessories, starting with brave steps across the airport terminal toting the new Gucci Courrier GG Supreme suitcase. Travel continues to be a source of inspiration for Alessandro Michele. A collection of bags in the GG motif is enriched with a blend of contemporary embroideries-like the UFO-and vintage inspired details, including airmail trims. The appliqués are individually embroidered and then skillfully hand-applied to each piece by specialized artisans. This process ensures that no two items will be alike, giving each a one-of-a-kind appearance.

With the new rules of classic elegance, it might be time to re-look your travel accessories, starting with brave steps across the airport terminal toting the new Gucci Courrier GG Supreme suitcase. Travel continues to be a source of inspiration for Alessandro Michele. A collection of bags in the GG motif is enriched with a blend of contemporary embroideries-like the UFO-and vintage inspired details, including airmail trims. The appliqués are individually embroidered and then skillfully hand-applied to each piece by specialized artisans. This process ensures that no two items will be alike, giving each a one-of-a-kind appearance.

New classic mens style rules also mean going "vintage" - here, the new Longines Legend Diver ref. L3.674.4.50.6, equipped with the unique inner rotating bezel and Longines' L633 movement, now on "shark mesh" or milanese bracelet for a dressy or casual aesthetic depending on your ensemble.

New classic mens style rules also mean going “vintage” – here, the new Longines Legend Diver ref. L3.674.4.50.6, equipped with the unique inner rotating bezel and Longines’ L633 movement, now on “shark mesh” or milanese bracelet for a dressy or casual aesthetic depending on your ensemble.

Getting experimental with textures and colours

Sure, stick to the sombre staples of classic men’s style with a serious palette of blues, greys and browns but do punch things up a bit with bright patterns and motifs like those of Hermes, Bally and Gucci.

A Prada check cotton jacket or blazer with cotton pants pulls equal duty for a smart casual ensemble under the auspices of the new rules of classic elegance. To fulfil the "elegance" aspect of the bargain, I would probably go for something other than sandals.

A Prada check cotton jacket or blazer with cotton pants pulls equal duty for a smart casual ensemble under the auspices of the new rules of classic elegance. To fulfil the “elegance” aspect of the bargain, I would probably go for something other than sandals.

Following the same colour palette of the previous ensemble, I would suggest this pair of Dior Homme ankle sneakers by Kris Van Asche from the Spring 2017 collection - Prince of Wales check embossed grey leather covered with splotches of white or colour paint

Following the same colour palette of the previous ensemble, I would suggest this pair of Dior Homme ankle sneakers by Kris Van Asche from the Spring 2017 collection – Prince of Wales check embossed grey leather covered with splotches of white or colour paint

Alternatively, a Paul Smith wool suit with cotton shirt and Louis Vuitton canvas espadrilles also acquits itself as a dressy while casual ensemble

Alternatively, a Paul Smith wool suit with cotton shirt and Louis Vuitton canvas espadrilles also acquits itself as a dressy while casual ensemble

The new Men’s Smart Casual

The new rules of classic elegance also mean that with DGAF style, your casual weekend clothes can start beginning to pull their weight as parts of your weekday ensemble too. This revolution in classic style has given rise to streetwear which is now luxurious, sneakers which are now artisanal and leather jackets which are less for the motorcycle and more for the office – your weekend uniform now pulls double duty as weekday hallmarks of great sartorialism and stylish panache.

Here, this Prada cotton jacket - like the one Jude Law was wearing in the campaign visuals, is layered on a Prada wool vest, cotton shirt, pants, leather shoes and paired with their three tone leather shoes in brogues. The leather backpack is just icing on cake.

Here, this Prada cotton jacket – like the one Jude Law was wearing in the campaign visuals, is layered on a Prada wool vest, cotton shirt, pants, leather shoes and paired with their three tone leather shoes in brogues. The leather backpack is just icing on cake.

For an even more classic look, try these Jimmy Choo tassel loafers with dandy stripes and tassels

For an even more classic look, try these Jimmy Choo tassel loafers with dandy stripes and tassels

Luxuriously Old School

Fewer devotees to men’s classic styles also means an opportunity has risen to dominate a space in the fashion spectrum where plenty of men have vacated – time to embrace houndstooth patterns and checks again.

Special Thanks to sister publication Men’s Folio for shots and styling.

Image credits for Classic Men’s Style and the New Rules of Classic Elegance – Photography assistant – Alfie Pan, Styling assistant – Henry Boen Lim, Hair – Joanne Er/ Monsoon Salon Novena using Hatsuga, Grooming – Aaron Ng/ Decorum; Photography assistant – Marie Liang, Hair – Junz Loke/ Passion Salon, Grooming – Benedict Choo using YSL; Models – Stefan Fucina/ AVE, Xu Bin

From Hatebeast to Hypebeast: Lawsuits and 30 years later, Streetwear has overtaken Louis Vuitton and Gucci

Tailor Daniel Day aka Dapper Dan was a streetwear pioneer when he incorporated luxury brand motifs by creating "bootleg" fur jackets by adapting branded garment bags, sparking a commercially successful trend. He was eventually sued, his store closed and today, we have come full circle with Gucci paying homage to his original 80s creation. He appears in NYT as a result.

Tailor Daniel Day aka Dapper Dan was a streetwear pioneer when he incorporated luxury brand motifs by creating “bootleg” fur jackets by adapting branded garment bags, sparking a commercially successful trend. He was eventually sued, his store closed and today, we have come full circle with Gucci paying homage to his original 80s creation. He appears in NYT as a result.

It’s official, the luxury industry is at a cross-roads – from big watch conglomerates struggling to find their footing to big fashion brands collaborating with small counter-culture brands for survival and relevance, luxury brand Chief Executives are going to find themselves asking one crucial question – in an industry steeped in heritage, tradition and classicism, how does one look forward without betraying these very values? More importantly, how do brands ensure commercial survival by appealing to a younger generation of shoppers without alienating the old guards?

But first, we need to understand the definition of the phenomenon we’re are about to explore. What is a hypebeast? According to the Urban Dictionary, It is a person who follows a trend to be cool or in style. A person who wears what is hyped up, collecting clothing and accessories for the sole purpose of impressing others.

Born from East-Coast (that is to say Californian) Skate and Surf culture, Streetwear began its roots with basics tees and denims eventually dressed with graphic logos and motifs pioneered by brands like Japanese A Bathing Ape and Supreme. Thus, with the now obvious synergy between prestige branding and prominent (if satirical) labelling, one can start to understand why the blending of cultures between streetwear and high fashion was inevitable.

From Hatebeast to Hypebeast: Lawsuits and 30 years later, Streetwear culture has overtaken Louis Vuitton and Gucci

On 19 January 2017, Guy Trebay opined in the New York Times that “Maybe Louis Vuitton Should Have Stayed Enemies with Supreme” – He recalled a lawsuit in 2000 when Louis Vuitton sued Supreme with a cease-and-desist order when the streetwear label spoofed the Louis Vuitton monogram on their skateboard deck. Little would they know that slightly under 20 years later, Louis Vuitton would be willingly surrendering their precious brand DNA and voluntarily joining prestige wear with devil-may-care streetwear in their latest Louis Vuitton men’s Fall Winter 2017 collection.

Cultural appropriation? Culture War? Or Just plain Culture? A Brief History on Streetwear’s influence on Fashion

In the 1980s, a designer from the streets of Harlem became notorious for his streetwear looks – Daniel Day, better known as Dapper Dan, was a legendary tailor who would make bespoke pieces for his rapper and athlete clientele with logos from many of the big fashion brands. His designs were of such popularity with the likes of Olympic sprinter Diane Dixon (and other notable entertainment celebrities) that his boutique was eventually sued out of existence in 1992.

Gucci Cruise 2018 collection. Image: Gucci instagram

Gucci Cruise 2018 collection. Image: Gucci instagram

26 years later, Gucci dropped a look in their Cruise 2018 collection which appeared to have been ripped off a design by the Harlem tailor and many on the internet were quick to pounce on the fashion house including sprinter Dixon for whom Dapper Dan had famously created the puffy sleeved fur jacket with Louis Vuitton monogram (rather than the interlocking Gucci Gs).

“Give credit to @dapperdanharlem He did it FIRST in 1989!” – Diane Dixon on Instagram

 

In response to the internet ire, Gucci released a statement – “Gucci’s ‘new Renaissance’ cruise 2018 fashion show included references to periods of revitalization spanning many different eras, in particular the European Renaissance, the ’70s and the ’80s. The collection also saw a continuation of Alessandro Michele’s exploration of faux-real culture with a series of pieces playing on the Gucci logo and monogram, including a puff-sleeved bomber jacket from the 1980s in an homage to the work of the renowned Harlem tailor Daniel ‘Dapper Dan’ Day and in celebration of the culture of that era in Harlem.”

Indeed, the Alessandro Michele had tagged him on Instagram after failing to get in touch with Dan in an instagram caption saying: Inside the #GucciCruise18 collection by #AlessandroMichele, a look that celebrates an iconic style of hip-hop fashion culture from the 80s—a plush jacket featuring puffy sleeves monogrammed in GG motif. Legendary tailor Dapper Dan @dapperdanharlem influenced the trend by making such custom pieces for his rapper and athlete clients out of logos from famous fashion houses, including #Gucci. In a homage to Dapper Dan, this jacket worn with jeans and a lurex headpiece is flanked with a striped knit with cross-stitch embroidery, cotton shorts and a georgette gown with trompe l’oeil details.

As THE original “influencer” (today, a derogatory term describing wannabe instagram “bloggers”), so powerful was Dan’s vision that in the 10 years he operated Dapper Dan’s Boutique, he turned a tidy profit upcycling garment bags from Gucci, Louis Vuitton and Fendi which he then cut and tailored into bespoke fur coats and sharp suits. At the height of its popularity, Dan started to offer his custom skills to auto-detailing with services to brand cars with the monograms and logos of upscale fashion brands. It was a look which travelled by word of mouth and walking advertisements (his customers) which caught the attention from rappers to the most unsavory of characters – in an act of true counter-culture, Dapper Dan had appropriated luxurious symbols of wealth for the consumers who wouldn’t otherwise be able to afford it (NYT has an excellent profile piece on Daniel Day, do check it out). That said, while it appears that his “pirated” style of art would eventually be adopted by the likes of Balenciaga, Louis Vuitton and Gucci, the truth is, the fashion world has often been finding inspiration in the street.

 

To Gucci’s benefit, the lessons of history are not lost upon them (as befitting a bonafide heritage brand), rather than sue New York Artist Trevor “Trouble” Andrew into oblivion for selling fake GucciGhost items, Alessandro Michele co-opted the artist into the brand, launching GucciGhost as a capsule collection in 2016. For Cruise 2018, Gucci’s Michele also out-pirated the pirates with dodgy-misspellings on their faux Gucci products by adopting the “GUCCY” label on genuine Gucci products – what are the pirates going to do? Sue? It was a move that was incredibly meta and undeniably street; 10 years ago, no one would ever have thought that a fashion brand would ever be capable of winning a street-fight.

And yet, why should it surprise anyone that the fashion world has been finding inspiration and muse in everyday things? Largely cyclical, Louis Vuitton’s take on the “China” shopping Bag (so named for the Chinese immigrants who used them to carry wares around) in 2007 found a new interpretation in Balenciaga this time, trolling the fashion world with their Thai shopping bag (commonly seen in Bangkok were shoppers at the various Thai market would carry their.. you get the point).

Pictured left: Louis Vuitton shopping bag. Right; "Chinatown" shopping bag popularised by Chinese immigrants

Pictured left: Louis Vuitton shopping bag. Right; “Chinatown” shopping bag popularised by Chinese immigrants

2001: A collision course between Louis Vuitton and Streetwear

How does a heritage malletier that  is trunk-maker become a collaborator with a streetwear brand infused with the edgy rebellion of skateboard indie culture? Slowly. In 2001, then Creative Director Marc Jacobs presided over one of the most non-Louis Vuitton eras in the history of the maison. Jacobs started to work with designers like Stephen Sprouse, Murakami and Yayoi Kusama to re-interpret and get creative with the brand’s signature motifs. Right up till that point, any alteration or perceived “denigration” of the logo was a big no no in accordance with branding principles but Jacobs managed to convince his bosses and the result was a Louis Vuitton reborn for a younger audience, no longer the domain of wealthy white ladies of leisure; reportedly, Louis Vuitton made US$300 million from the collaboration and the maison realised: hey, if it ain’t broke, why fix it?

Marc Jacobs with Murakami at the launch of the Cherry World

Marc Jacobs with Murakami at the launch of the Cherry World

The Cherry World of Takashi Murakami, a collaboration with Louis Vuitton

The Cherry World of Takashi Murakami, a collaboration with Louis Vuitton

Kim Jones is likely the most influential designer you’ve never heard of. Handling high street and high fashion with equal panache is not a skillset that many designers are capable of. A streetwear enthusiast and collector, Jones, a MA graduate of Central Saint Martins, first unveiled his namesake label in 2003 with a collection inspired of 90s rave culture – the sort of underground counter-culture adjacent with the skateboarding, underground party attending crowd. The year after, Umbro by Kim Jones was his foray into sportswear where he pioneered the concept of “athleisure” – a major pillar of streetwear philosophy – garments meant for skateboarding and active living – designer sneakers and fashion pump paired with playful prints  added street flair to once unfashionable sporting attire. By 2006, he was awarded Menswear Designer of the Year Award by the British Fashion Council, with his various looks: suits with sneakers, athleisure tracksuits and puffer coats, he was telegraphic his passion for streetwear from high street to high fashion. When Kanye West was launching clothing line Pastelle in 2008, Jones too headed that project – neon colours and flair, signature of Kanye’s sartorial sensitives were capably demonstrated by Jones. Like Dapper Dan, having an A-list hip hop performer wearing you swag is 100 points on the street-cred-meter. Leaving his position as Creative Director at Dunhill, Kim Jones joined Louis Vuitton in 2011. There he parlayed his deft touch with punk, hype and culture by working with Kiro Hirata – adding an artisanal touch to streetwear through the Japanese craft of patching denim or boro. Jones’s international jetset outlook with childhood from Botswana to Tanzania allow him the advantage of a plethora of motifs which African-American cultures would find attractive. After Hirata, Jones worked with Hiroshi Fujiwara, incorporating more streetwear elements into Louis Vuitton.

“I take the DNA of the brand and infuse it with something else to create excitement, some critics say that I’m just jumping on the bandwagon, but actually I’m not, it’s always been part of my DNA.” – Kim Jones to South China Morning Post

mrkimjones instagram: Louis Vuitton X Fragment coming soon @fujiwarahiroshi photographed by #pieterhugo

mrkimjones instagram: Louis Vuitton X Fragment coming soon @fujiwarahiroshi photographed by #pieterhugo

The critical debate on the joining of streetwear label and luxury brand is heated; thus LUXUO decided to speak to Mark Sabotage, a prominent Singaporean sneaker artist and streetwear aficionado about the debate surrounding the blurring of lines between street and high fashion.

“There used to be a clear line between luxury and street which then became blur and now it’s almost non existent. With this collaboration, it’s now evident. To me, this is a real mark in the history books when street culture rose to power, much like how hip hop became the soundtrack of white america slowly in the early 2000s and especially when Eminem was created.” – Mark Sabotage aka SBTG

So you don’t think it’s selling out? Isn’t this culture about individuality and independence (if not rebellion)?

Supreme runs 20+ years deep and the people who where in the start of such cultures all grew up to be some one of power in whatever industry they are in. And i would think Kim Jones is part of this culture. So to me, its a natural progression.

The world is changing, batons are passed , and young people are more in power now vs 20 years back. So many ‘old’ brands wanna project a younger image now.

Gone is the brown Louis Vuitton signature colourway and in comes the distinct red Supreme colour scheme.

Gone is the brown Louis Vuitton signature colourway and in comes the distinct red Supreme colour scheme.

Doesn’t this benefit LV commercially and hurt Supreme in terms of street cred?

I personally don’t feel so. There used to be a clear line between luxury and street which then became blur and now it’s almost non existent. With this collaboration, it’s now evident. To me, this is a real mark in the history books when street culture rose to power, much like how hip hop became the soundtrack of white america slowly in the early 2000s and especially when Eminem was created.

So this isn’t about rich people branded labels vs. non-conformist street skateboarders – this is more like the natural evolution of two cultures joining together, there never was a “culture war” to begin with?

Yes, it’s my observation since I became a part of the culture since day 1. Some consumers may take it personally and feel betrayed but truly, history happens anyway with or without your consent. Kim Jones has deep street culture background and now he has risen to power and with it, the right to call the shots. Skateboarding has contributed to fashion more than everyone thinks. Streetwear mocked luxury in many ways in the 90s, made spoofs. Skateboarding is the genesis of so many things, Vans shoes has skate roots and now the world is wearing them.

Mr. Sabotage's own 'Charlie 101' cargo tote adapted from a vintage postal and a Birkin bag.

Mr. Sabotage’s own ‘Charlie 101’ cargo tote adapted from a vintage postal and a Birkin bag.

To get the perspective on the fashion side of things, LUXUO spoke to Jasmine Tuan, Creative Director at Brandmama Pte Ltd and Co-founder at FrüFrü & Tigerlily to hear what she thinks of the Louis Vuitton x Supreme collaboration.

Brands are playing strong to keep themselves relevant. – Jasmine Tuan, Brandmama Pte Ltd

Who do you feel it benefits more? Louis Vuitton or Supreme?

It is similar to H&M x Margiela, Marni, Balmain; Collaboration is another way to create hype, media buzz which in turn converts to hype and profit.

Jasmine Tuan, Creative Director at Brandmama Pte Ltd and Co-founder at FrüFrü & Tigerlily; She was also Managing Director of the now defunct but critically successful Blackmarket

Jasmine Tuan, Creative Director at Brandmama Pte Ltd and Co-founder at FrüFrü & Tigerlily; She was also Managing Director of the now defunct but critically successful Blackmarket

But if profit is the objective, what happens to street cred?

In order to sustain any brand, you need money and cash flow. When is the last time a Supreme fan bought a Supreme item? When is the last time an LV fan bought an LV item?

Although both brands have strong following, people might stop going in to a Supreme or LV boutique to shop for their usual range or follow their new collection, but would go visit the brands again for such collaboration since there is a new reason to buy something new and limited.

Some even see it as investment as they know prices will go up and they can fetch profit and returns. It’s a clever move to stir media buzz and sales. Limited editions have been proven to work – H&M collaborations Balmain, Marni, Margiela, Valentino are all snapped by Day one. Today, people are still selling them at a higher price whether it’s worn once or new., simply because you can’t get it in the market anymore.

So the whole point of “counter culture” street wear is irrelevant? There’s no more rebellion? The brands have won?

It still exists and is very much relevant. Just that a few of them who still have minds of their own and are not affected by social media hype. Brands are playing strong to keep themselves relevant.

Louis Vuitton sued Supreme to stop production and sale of the LV skateboard deck. It is noteworthy that instead of the brown colour palette, Louis Vuitton has now adopted Supreme's red colourway instead. Also, an original 2000 Supreme LV deck just sold on eBay for $10,000. Beat that with a stick.

Louis Vuitton sued Supreme to stop production and sale of the LV skateboard deck. It is noteworthy that instead of the brown colour palette, Louis Vuitton has now adopted Supreme’s red colourway instead. Also, an original 2000 Supreme LV deck just sold on eBay for $10,000. Beat that with a stick.

The need to Appeal to the Younger Generation is not Unique to Fashion, the Watch Industry is also undergoing upheaval and renewal

Indeed, targeting the next generation (if not a younger generation) of well-financed consumers is not a phenomenon unique to the fashion industry. The watch industry is also just finding its way out of one of the longest periods of market contraction in recent history.

In 2016, Patek Philippe set tongues wagging when they released the most “unlikely Patek Philippe watch” ever – the Calatrava Pilot Travel Time Ref. 5524. According to CEO Thierry Stern, the new novelty was meant to draw attention from a generation of new watch consumers who were “not interested in their father’s watch”, though the brand drew some flak for its close similarity to another manufacture’s offering, the Calatrava Pilot Travel Time was a commercial success, so much so that this year, Patek Philippe launched the US only limited edition 5522A Pilot’s Calatrava as part of the celebrations for the Art of Watchmaking Grand Exhibition. And it’s not just Patek Philippe, brands like Corum are also starting to appeal to a younger audience with fun Bubble watches and collaborations with designers.

Truth is, whatever the commercial realities are in whichever industry, there will always be a clarion call for “honesty” and a rootedness in the brand. For now, in a highly cynical marketplace, there is no doubt that collaborations are commercial successes. But it remains to be seen if collaborations are the way forward, after all, there’s still a demand for authenticity. Sure, there will be demand for Supreme for Louis Vuitton items but there’s a good chance your purist streetwear aficionados who typically queue outside Supreme’s flagship in New York are not the same people who are in line at Vuitton stores. These rebels make an unhyped product “hype” by virtue of their power as trendsetters rather than trend-followers, they alone stand as templars to the concept of street credibility.

That said, we live in a very unique age where the big brands have stopped hating the hypebeast and embraced them; Yet, the hypebeast stands separate from a new creature – the Hautebeast; this Hautebeast is in all of us (at least lovers of luxury goods and prestige products).

 

 

(Star Trek) Gucci Fall 2017 campaign goes where no Fashion Brand has Gone Before

Gucci Fall 2017 campaign in the transporter room of the USS GucciandBeyond - TM & © 2017 CBS Studios Inc. STAR TREK and related marks are properties owned by CBS Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Gucci Fall 2017 campaign in the transporter room of the USS GucciandBeyond – TM & © 2017 CBS Studios Inc. STAR TREK and related marks are properties owned by CBS Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Tapping into the zeitgeist of popular science fiction, Gucci Creative Director Alessandro Michele eschews the Abram-esque vision of Star trek and fully embraces the retro-futurist settings of Roddenberry’s original series with her fantastic Gucci Fall/Winter 2017 campaign. Going where no fashion brand has gone before, (Star trek) Gucci Beyond joins the bridge of what appears to the USS Enterprise 1701 in a alchemical mix of high fashion, alien motifs, scene-scapes and even the Creature of the Black Lagoon.

Gucci Fall 2017 campaign trailer

Explore the fashion frontier with GucciandBeyond

Posted by LUXUO on Wednesday, 26 July 2017

“Anytime I see a movie or a TV show where there’s people from the future or another planet, they’re all wearing the same thing – The one-piece silver jumpsuit, V-stripe, and boots. We’re going to be visiting other planets, we want people to know we’re on the same team.” – Jerry Seinfeld

The muse of 1950s and 60s sci-fi genre proves an apt canvas for Alessandro Michele’s latest Gucci campaign. The Fall/Winter 2017 campaign was first delivered as a collection of Instagram posts in April as Gucci explored brave new worlds – finding new life and sharing their vision of new couture in a universe of humanoids, aliens, robots and earthlings in a galaxy far, far away.

Gucci Fall 2017 campaign takes us to the bridge of the USS GucciandBeyond where thankfully, humanity dresses in more than just a one-piece jump suit with boots - Gucci Fall 2017 campaign in the transporter room of the USS GucciandBeyond - TM & © 2017 CBS Studios Inc. STAR TREK and related marks are properties owned by CBS Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Gucci Fall 2017 campaign takes us to the bridge of the USS GucciandBeyond where thankfully, humanity dresses in more than just a one-piece jump suit with boots – Gucci Fall 2017 campaign in the transporter room of the USS GucciandBeyond – TM & © 2017 CBS Studios Inc. STAR TREK and related marks are properties owned by CBS Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.

(Star Trek) Gucci Fall 2017 campaign goes where no Fashion Brand has Gone Before

In Gucci’s vision of retro-future, one can be thankful that Seinfeld’s and Star Trek’s vision of the one-piece uniform with boots never comes to pass, instead, human characters togged out in a dazzling array of textures and colours which comprise of the Gucci Fall 2017 campaign greet extra-terrestrials and battle dinosaurs on Earth’s pre-history before being beamed up to psychedelic starship juxtaposes high fashion with sci-fi in a wild, never before seen fantastical composition which underscores how brilliant the commentary is.

GucciandBeyond shows an other worldly fashion sensibility beyond race, culture and species. - Creature of the Black Lagoon courtesy of Universal Studios Licensing LLC

GucciandBeyond shows an other worldly fashion sensibility beyond race, culture and species. – Creature of the Black Lagoon courtesy of Universal Studios Licensing LLC

No fashion or species barrier is too great for GucciandBeyond Fall 2017.

No fashion or species barrier is too great for GucciandBeyond Fall 2017.

Appointed creative director of Gucci in January 2015, Michele  is known for his over-the-top creative direction; testament to his unbounded, unconstrained vision and talent,  he was first tapped by Tom Ford in 2002 where his 12-year tenure within the Gucci design studio spanned a wide variety of roles, by May 2011, he was second only to then Creative Director Frida Giannini.

The house’s Fall Winter 2017 espouse Michele’s larger than life style – with him less isn’t more – more is more and some how, the crazy pattern mixing, embroidery and high sheen almost chrome aesthetic makes even the most classically oriented gent (but then I am a self-confessed Trekker) get beamed aboard Starship GucciandBeyond.

GucciandBeyond patent leather three strip sneaker on transporter pad - TM & © 2017 CBS Studios Inc. STAR TREK and related marks are properties owned by CBS Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.

GucciandBeyond patent leather three strip sneaker on transporter pad – TM & © 2017 CBS Studios Inc. STAR TREK and related marks are properties owned by CBS Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.

The original Star Trek inspired series with the Star Wars intro is creating such waves that even fashion-averse geek sites like iO9 have picked up this latest Gucci Fall 2017 campaign. Luxuo is off the opinion that even Michele’s vision of Trek might be more interesting than the mixed-reception that is Star Trek:Discovery.

The new GucciandBeyond campaign begs you to take a leap to the fashion frontier, instead of exploring brave new worlds, it’s an exploration of adventurous sartorialism. Surprisingly, it is to art director Christopher Simmonds and Director Glen Luchford’s credit that this B-movie trailer doesn’t feel kitschy at all. Complete with Ray Harryhausen-like stop-motion effects and a hovering UFO, Gucci is likely the only fashion house which is currently in possession of a Fall 2017 campaign trailer that people actually want turned into a regular series: #gucciandbeyond

 

 

Gucci perfume in 2017: Dakota Johnson named new face of the fragrance “Bloom”

Wholly fashioned by creative director Alessandro Michele, Bloom is the new spring summer fragrance by Italian luxury house Gucci. With actress Dakota Johnson as the face of its campaign, the fragrance is slated to represent the modern woman. The launch of the scent was celebrated on May 2 with a party in New York.

Michele, who was appointed creative director of the house in 2015 and who is responsible for all of Gucci’s men’s and women’s collections, worked in collaboration with master perfumer Alberto Morillas to create this feminine fragrance.

The scent is a mix of tuberose and jasmine, combined with Rangoon Creeper — a unique flower discovered in South India that is being used for the first time in fragrance.  Bloom will be packaged in a classic, rectangular-shaped bottle in powder pink, decorated with a minimalist black and white label. The floral element ties in with Michele’s ready-to-wear designs, which regularly feature botanical motifs.

Italian-born Michele was a leather goods designer at Gucci before taking over as creative director following the departure of his predecessor Frida Giannini. He is credited with breathing new life into the house, and his feminine, vintage-inspired designs have inspired legions of fans around the world.

From May 3, Bloom will be available to pre-order in limited quantities ahead of the official release, which will be in August for the US, but not until Spring 2018 in Europe.

Designer bicycle: Limited edition Gucci ‘Guccissima’ bicycle from 2005 goes up for sale

For those who remember a time when Tom Ford was the creative mind behind Gucci, you may recall that the designer had created more than just designer clothes. Prior to his departure from the Italian label, the designer produced what is now known as the Gucci ‘Guccissima’ Limited Edition 2005 bicycle. For those who would love to get their hands on anything vintage and unique, then this may just be your chance.

According to Cope & Cabrera, who happens to have just one of the bicycle’s as a part of its private collection, this is the first time that one is up for auction. Hand-crafted and a work of art that few will be able to call their own, the bicycle features all the signature Gucci characteristics. From the signature leather seat that showcases the chocolate brown shade that Gucci is known for to the seat pack that is fitted with a buckle enclosure and a double pannier travel bag, no detail has been left to chance.

The metallic bronze frame of the bicycle also displays the signature stripes of Gucci and has the large double-G emblems throughout. If that was not enough, the brand even engraved ‘GG’ on the bell. The bicycle has been on display for eight years now and is said to be in near perfect condition Though, should you wish to own the Gucci ‘Guccissima’ bicycle, be sure to part with a cool US$11,676 — a small price really for something that is expertly crafted.

To learn more about how to get your hands on the Gucci ‘Guccissima’ bicycle, visit Vestiaire Collective for more information.

Gucci Sponsors Chatsworth House Fashion Exhibition

Gucci Sponsors Chatsworth House Fashion Exhibition

Britain’s Chatsworth House has been revealed as the setting for what is widely expected to be one of 2017’s major fashion exhibitions, sponsored by Gucci.

“House Style: Five Centuries of Fashion at Chatsworth” is set to explore the life of the historical Cavendish family and additional famous figures, including Bess of Hardwick, the 18th century “Empress of Fashion” Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire; Fred Astaire’s sister and dance partner Adele Astaire and Nancy Mitford. Supermodel Stella Tennant will also have a starring role in the show.

Covering art history, fashion, jewelry, design and textiles, the exhibition will tell the story of the Devonshire Collection and the role fashion played in the protagonists’ lives. Curated by International Editor-at-Large at American Vogue Hamish Bowles, it will be set into various rooms of the house and organized by theme, including ‘Coronation Dress’, ‘The Devonshire House Ball’, ‘Bess of Hardwick and the Tudor influence’, ‘The Georgiana Effect’ and ‘Entertaining at Chatsworth’, among others. Highlights include a Givenchy bolero worn on the Duchess of Devonshire’s wedding day, uniforms, coronation robes and fancy-dress costumes, and historic and contemporary couture from Christian Dior, Gucci, Helmut Lang, Vivienne Westwood, Alexander McQueen and Vetements.

“This exhibition proves how much historical objects are an incredible source of inspiration for creating the present,” says Alessandro Michele, Creative Director at Gucci. “Thus far the house has been speaking, now House Style gives a voice to the wardrobes of its inhabitants and guests.

“House Style: Five Centuries of Fashion at Chatsworth”, a 200-page survey of fashion at Chatsworth featuring photographs by Mario Testino, Cecil Beaton and Bruce Weber, will also be published to mark the exhibition.

The exhibition will run from March 25 to October 22 2017. For more information, see www.chatsworth.org