Properties / Luxury Homes

Invest in These: 4 Most Expensive Homes

These four homes are amazing propositions, priced out of reach of even the richest. Truly homes for the world’s one percenters, each is a real estate wonder.

Oct 30, 2016 | By Staff Writer

Forget those expensive cars that would turn heads on the road. The Palace team picks out four of the most expensive homes from around the world that you can add to your property portfolio. We’re be adding a little more depth to each item here now that we are no longer constrained by print pages.

Le Palais Bulles, France $456 million (Main Picture)
Located in Théoule-sur-Mer, South-eastern France, this ‘Bubble Palace’ by Hungarian architect Antti Lovag features a 13,000 sq. ft. main residence with 10 bedroom suites, three swimming pools, a 500-seat auditorium, and views of the Mediterranean. If you must ask, even after taking a good long look at the place, the bubble palace is like a tribute to round shapes and is owned by Pierre Cardin. Fashion legend Cardin is of course famous for the bubble dress so there is a correlation to his choice of design for his home, and indeed his choice of architect in Lovag. A man who famously believed that the straight line was “an aggression against nature,” Lovag was just to guy to hire if you wanted a home or building that was mainly round. Built in 1979 and owned by Cardin since then, this six-level property has hosted many star-studded events, including the 2016 Dior Resort Show, and is available through Christie’s.

Sky Penthouse, Monaco $400 millionSky Penthouse, Monaco

Providing stunning views of the Mediterranean, this massive 35,500 sq. ft. Sky Penthouse crowns the Tour Odéon, a 170-meter twin-skyscraper residence that is the first high-rise to be built in Monaco since the 1980s. High-rises were deemed architecturally undesirable in the 1980s and this new effort has encountered some of the same obstacles. Nevertheless, Prince Albert appears quite prepared to see it through so it will indeed become a major landmark in the famously land-scarce city-state. The Tour Odéon or Odeon Tower will be the tallest building in Monaco and the second highest on the Mediterranean. Located near the Place du Casino, Hôtel de Paris and Hôtel Hermitage, the home includes a cinema, library, gym and a infinity pool with a waterslide. Scheduled for 2018 completion, the home – the Daily Mail called it the world’s most expensive apartment – is available through Knight Frank.

Great Island, U.S.A $175 million001_greatisland

Tucked in the affluent Darien suburb of the Long Island Sound, this 63-acre estate, owned by the family of industrialist William Ziegler, is one of the most expensive properties in the US. In fact, according to the Wall Street Journal, if sold for its list price of $175 million, it will officially be the most expensive home sold in the USA. This stunning opportunity is apparently now available for the first time in more than a century. Built in the 1900s, the property includes a main residence with six bedrooms, staff and guest quarters, a private beach and dock, small waterfront cottages, and equestrian facilities. An hour from Manhattan, the property provides superb waterfront views and is available through Christie’s.

Palazzo di Amore, U.S.A $149 millionpalazzo-di-amore

Designed by developer Mohamed Hadid (father of supermodel Gigi Hadid), this 25-acre property in Beverly Hills features a 35,000 sq. ft. main residence and a guest home. This one was originally listed for $195 million in 2014 by current owner, real estate investor Jeff Greene so the current price might be considered a steal. The main residence features 12 bedrooms – including the 5,000 sqf master – and a whopping 23 bathrooms. The estate also includes a 15,000 sq. ft. entertainment complex with a ballroom, revolving dance floor, a 50-seat theatre, and a bowling alley. There is also a 27-car garage, a working vineyard producing six types of wine, and even an organic farm. Available through Coldwell Banker Previews International.

This article first appeared in Palace Magazine.

 
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